Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

Heat Transfer

Chemical Engineering : Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

The document Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev is a part of the Chemical Engineering Course Heat Transfer.
All you need of Chemical Engineering at this link: Chemical Engineering

Heat transfer in boiling and condensation

In the previous chapter we have discussed about the convective heat transfer in which the homogeneous single phase system was considered. The heat transfer processes associated with the change of fluid phase have great importance in chemical process industries. In this chapter, we will focus our attention towards the phase change from liquid to vapour and vice-versa.


6.1 Heat transfer during boiling

The conversion of a liquid into a vapour is one of the important and obvious phenomena. It has been found that if water (say) is totally distilled and degassed so that it does not have any impurity or dissolved gases, it will undergo liquid to vapour phase change without the appearance of bubbles, when it is heated in a clean and smooth container. However, in normal situation, as can be understood, the presence of impurities, dissolved gases, and surface irregularities causes the appearance of vapour bubble on the heating surface, when the rate of heat input is significantly high.

The boiling may be in general of two types. The one in which the heating surface is submerged in a quiescent part of liquid, and the heat transfer occur by free convection and bubble agitation. The process is known as pool boiling. The pool boiling may further be divided into sub-cooled or local boiling and saturated or bulk boiling. If the temperature of the liquid is below the saturation temperature, the process is known as sub-cooled, or local, boiling. If the liquid is maintained at saturation temperature, the process is known as saturated or bulk boiling.

The other form of the boiling is known as forced convective boiling in which the boiling occurs simultaneously with fluid motion induced by externally imposed pressure difference. In this chapter, we will mostly consider the pool boiling.

As generally the bubbles are formed during boiling, we will first refresh the following basic information. Consider a spherical bubble of radius  in a liquid as shown in fig. 6.1

Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

Fig. 6.1: Force balance on a submerge spherical bubble in a liquid

The pressure of vaporisation inside the bubble, Pvap, must exceed that in the surrounding liquid, Pliq, because of the surface tension (σ) acting on the liquid-vapour interface.

The force balance on the equatorial plane

πr2(Pvap - Pliq) = 2πrσ

Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev               (6.1)

 

The eq. 6.1 shows that to create a bubble of small radius, it would be necessary to develop very large pressure in the vapour. In other word, a high degree super heat is necessary for the generation of a tiny bubble (or nucleus) in the bulk liquid. This is the reason, the bubble are usually formed at bits existing in the surface irregularities, where a bubble of finite initial radius may form, or where gasses dissolved in the system of the liquid come out of the solution.

6.2 Boiling of saturated liquid

In this section, we will discuss about the boiling curve which is a log-log plot between heat flux (q/A) or heat transfer coefficient (h) and excess temperature (ΔT). Excess temperature (ΔT = Tw - Tsat)  is the temperature difference between heating surface (Tw) and saturated temperature of the liquid (Tsat).  

Figure 6.2 shows a typical representative pool boiling curves for water contained in a container where the water is heated by an immersed horizontal wire. Consider we are measuring the heat flux (thus, h) and the temperature difference (ΔT) between the boiling water (Tsat) and the wall temperature of the heater wire (Tw). The temperature of the heater wire is gradually raised while measuring the heat flux between heated surface and boiling water until a large value of ΔT reaches. The corresponding plot is prepared at the log-log scale. The plot shows six different sections in the boiling curve shown in the fig.6.2.

Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

Fig. 6.2: Saturated water boiling curve

The different regimes of the boiling plot (fig. 6.2) have different mechanism. We will see those mechanisms in-brief in the following section.

Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Related Searches

Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

,

Viva Questions

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

ppt

,

Summary

,

Exam

,

past year papers

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Extra Questions

,

study material

,

Important questions

,

Objective type Questions

,

Sample Paper

,

pdf

,

Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

,

practice quizzes

,

video lectures

,

mock tests for examination

,

MCQs

,

Heat Transfer in Boiling & Condensation - 1 Chemical Engineering Notes | EduRev

,

Semester Notes

,

Free

;