Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

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HERMITE FUNCTIONS

Generating Functions — Hermite Polynomials 

The Hermite polynomials (Fig. 13.1), Hn (x ), may be defined by the generating function 2

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev           (13.1)

 

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev


Recurrence Relations

Note the absence of a superscript, which distinguishes Hermite polynomials from the unrelated Hankel functions. From the generating function we find that the Hermite polynomials satisfy the recurrence relations

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev (13.2)

and

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev (13.3)

Equation (13.2) is obtained by differentiating the generating function with respect to t :

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which can be rewritten as

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Because each coefficient of this power series vanishes, Eq. (13.2) is established. Similarly, differentiation with respect to x leads to

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which yields Eq. (13.3) upon shifting the summation index n in the last sum n + 1 → n.

Table 13.1 Hermite Polynomials

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

The Maclaurin expansion of the generating function

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

gives H0 (x ) = 1 and H1 (x ) = 2x , and then the recursion Eq. (13.2) permits the construction of any Hn (x ) desired (integral n). For convenient reference the first several Hermite polynomials are listed in Table 13.1.
Special values of the Hermite polynomials follow from the generating function for
x = 0:

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

that is,

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

We also obtain from the generating function the important parity relation

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

by noting that Eq. (13.1) yields

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

 

Alternate Representations 

The Rodrigues representation of Hn (x ) is

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Let us show this using mathematical induction as follows.


Example 13.1.1 RODRIGUES REPRESENTATION 

We rewrite the generating function as Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev and note that

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

This yields

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

to establish the n + 1 case, with the last equality following from Eqs.(13.2) and (13.3).

More directly, differentiation of the generating function n times with respect to t and then setting t equal to zero yields

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

A second representation may be obtained by using the calculus of residues (Section 7.1).
If we multiply Eq. (13.1) by t −m−1 and integrate around the origin in the complex t -plane, only the term with Hm (x ) will survive:

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev             (13.8)

Also, from the Maclaurin expansion, Eq. (13.4), we can derive our Hermite polynomial H(x ) in series form: Using the binomial expansion of (2x − t)ν and the index N = s + ν ,

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

where [N/2] is the largest integer less than or equal to N/2. Writing the binomial coefficient in terms of factorials and using Eq. (13.1) we obtain

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

More explicitly, replacing N → n,wehave

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

This series terminates for integral n and yields our Hermite polynomial.


Orthogonality

If we substitute the recursion Eq. (13.3) into Eq. (13.2) we can eliminate the index n − 1, obtaining

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which was used already in Example 13.1.1. If we differentiate this recursion relation and substitute Eq. (13.3) for the index n + 1 we find

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which can be rearranged to the second-order ODE for Hermite polynomials. Thus, the recurrence relations (Eqs. (13.2) and (13.3)) lead to the second-order ODE

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which is clearly not self-adjoint.
To put the ODE in self-adjoint form, following Section 10.1, we multiply by exp (−x 2 ),

Exercise 10.1.2. This leads to the orthogonality integral

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

with the weighting function exp(−x 2), a consequence of putting the ODE into self-adjoint form. The interval (−∞, ∞) is chosen to obtain the Hermitian operator boundary conditions, Section 10.1. It is sometimes convenient to absorb the weighting function into the Hermite polynomials. We may define

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

with ϕn (x) no longer a polynomial.

Substitution into Eq. (13.10) yields the differential equation for ϕ(x),

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

This is the differential equation for a quantum mechanical, simple harmonic oscillator, which is perhaps the most important physics application of the Hermite polynomials.

Equation (13.13) is self-adjoint, and the solutions ϕn (x ) are orthogonal for the interval (−∞ <x < ∞) with a unit weighting function.
The problem of normalizing these functions remains. Proceeding as in Section 12.3, we multiply Eq. (13.1) by itself and then by e−x 2 . This yields

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

When we integrate this relation over x from −∞ to +∞, the cross terms of the double sum drop out because of the orthogonality property:3

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

using Eqs. (8.6) and (8.8). By equating coefficients of like powers of st , we obtain

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Quantum Mechanical Simple Harmonic Oscillator 

The following development of Hermite polynomials via simple harmonic oscillator wave functions φn (x ) is analogous to the use of the raising and lowering operators for angular momentum operators presented in Section 4.3. This means that we derive the eigenvalues n + 1/2 and eigenfunctions (the Hn (x )) without assuming the development that led to Eq. (13.13). The key aspect of the eigenvalue Eq. (13.13),  Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev−(2n + 1)ϕn (x), is that the Hamiltonian

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

almost factorizes. Using naively a2 − b2 = (a − b)(a + b), the basic commutatorHermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev i of quantum mechanics (with momentum px = Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev i)d/dx) enters as a correction in Eq. (13.16). (Because px is Hermitian, d/dx is anti-Hermitian, (d /dx) =−d/dx .) This commutator can be evaluated as follows. Imagine the differential operator d/dx acts on a wave function ϕ(x ) to the right, as in Eq. (13.13), so

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

by the product rule. Dropping the wave function ϕ from Eq. (13.17), we rewrite Eq. (13.17) as

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev                      (13.18)

a constant, and then verify Eq. (13.16) directly by expanding the product of operators.
The product form of Eq. (13.16), up to the constant commutator, suggests introducing the non-Hermitian operators

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

with Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev which are adjoints of each other. They obey the commutation relations

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which are characteristic of these operators and straightforward to derive from Eq. (13.18) and

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Returning to Eq. (13.16) and using Eq. (13.19) we rewrite the Hamiltonian as

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

we see that N has nonnegative igenvalues

We now show that if Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev is nonzero it is an eigenfunction with eigenvalue λn−1 = λn − 1. After normalizing Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev, this state is designated |n − 1}.Thisisprovedbythe commutation relations

  Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which follow from Eq. (13.20). These commutation relations characterize N as the number operator. To see this, we determine the eigenvalue of N for the states  Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev Using

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Applying Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev repeatedly, we can reach the lowest, or ground, state |0} with eigenvalue λ0 .We cannot step lower because λ0 ≥ 1/2. Therefore Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev |0}≡ 0, suggesting we construct ψ0 = |0} from the (factored) first-order ODE

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Integrating

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev              (13.28)

we obtain

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev               (13.29)

where c0 is an integration constant. The solution,

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev(13.30)

is a Gaussian that can be normalized, with c= π −1/4 using the error integral, Eqs. (8.6) and (8.8). Substituting ψ0 into Eq. (13.13) we find

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev(13.31)

so its energy eigenvalue is λ0 = 1/2 and its number eigenvalue is n = 0, confirming the notation |0}. Applying Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev repeatedly to ψ0 =|0}, all other eigenvalues are confirmed to be λn = n + 1/2, proving Eq. (13.13). The normalizations needed for Eq. (13.26) follow from Eqs. (13.25) and (13.23) and

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev       (13.32)

showing

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Thus, the excited-state wave functions, ψ12 , and so on, are generated by the raising operator

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

yielding (and leading to upcoming Eq. (13.38))

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

As shown, the Hermite polynomials are used in analyzing the quantum mechanical sim

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Our oscillating particle has mass m and total energy E . By use of the abbreviations

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

in which ω is the angular frequency of the corresponding classical oscillator, Eq. (13.36) becomes (with ψ(z) = ψ(x /α) = ψ(x ))

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

This is Eq. (13.13) with λ = 2n + 1  Hence (fig. 13.2)

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev (normalized). (13.39)

Alternatively, the requirement that n be an integer is dictated by the boundary conditions of the quantum mechanical system,

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

FIGURE 13.2 Quantum mechanical oscillator wave functions: The heavy bar on the x -axis indicates the allowed range of the classical oscillator with the same total energy.

As n ranges over integral values (n ≥ 0), we see that the energy is quantized and that there is a minimum or zero point energy

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev                 (13.41)

This zero point energy is an aspect of the uncertainty principle, a genuine quantum phenomenon.

In quantum mechanical problems, particularly in molecular spectroscopy, a number of integrals of the form

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

are needed. Examples for r = 1 and r = 2 (with n = m) are included in the exercises at the end of this section. A large number of other examples are contained in Wilson, Decius, and Cross.

In the dynamics and spectroscopy of molecules in the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, the motion of a molecule is separated into electronic, vibrational and rotational motion. Each vibrating atom contributes to a matrix element two Hermite polynomials, its initial state and another one to its final state. Thus, integrals of products of Hermite polynomials are needed.

 

Example 13.1.2 THREEFOLD HERMITE FORMULA

We want to calculate the following integral involving m = 3 Hermite polynomials:

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

where Ni ≥ 0 are integers. The formula (due to E. C. Titchmarsh, J. Lond. Math. Soc. 23: 15 (1948), see Gradshteyn and Ryzhik, p. 838, in the Additional Readings) generalizes the m = 2 case needed for the orthogonality and normalization of Hermite polynomials. To derive it, we start with the product of three generating functions of Hermite polynomials, multiply by e−x 2 , and integrate over x in order to generate I3 :

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

  Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

using the polynomial expansion

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

The powers of the foregoing tj tk become

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

That is, from

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

there follows

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

so we obtain

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

The ni are all fixed (making this case special and easy) because the Nare fixed, and

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRevan integer by parity. Hence, upon comparing the foregoing like t1 t2 t3 powers,

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which is the desired formula. If we order N≥ N2 ≥ N3 ≥ 0, then n1 ≥ n2 ≥ n3 ≥ 0 follows, being equivalent to N − N3 ≥ N − N2 ≥ N − N1 ≥ 0, which occur in the denominators of the factorials of I3

 

Example : DIRECT EXPANSION OF PRODUCTS OF HERMITE POLYNOMIALS 

In an alternative approach, we now start again from the generating function identity

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Using the binomial expansion and then comparing like powers of t1 t2 we extract an identity due to E. Feldheim (J. Lond. Math. Soc. 13: 22 (1938)):

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

For ν = 0 the coefficient of HN1 + N2 is obviously unity. Special cases, such as

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

can be derived from Table 13.1 and agree with the general twofold product formula. This compact formula can be generalized to products of m Hermite polynomials, and this in turn yields a new closed form result for the integral Im .

Let us begin with a new result for I4 containing a product of four Hermite polynomials. Inserting the Feldheim identity for HN1 HN2 and HN3 HN4 and using orthogonality

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

for the remaining product of two Hermite polynomials yields

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Here we use the notation M = (N1 + N2 + N+ N4 )/2 and write the binomial coefficients explicitly, so

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Now we return to the product expansion of m Hermite polynomials and the corresponding new result from it for Im . We prove a generalized Feldheim identity,

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

where

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

by mathematical induction. Multiplying this by HNm+1 and using the Feldheim identity, we end up with the same formula for m + 1 Hermite polynomials, including the recursion relation

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Its solution is

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

The limits of the summation indices are

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

The limits of the summation indices are

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev


Example : APPLICATIONS OF THE PRODUCT FORMULAS

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

which agrees with our earlier result of Example 13.1.2. The last expression is based on the following observations. The power of 2 has the exponent N1 + ν2 = N . The factorials from the binomial coefficients are N3 − ν2 = (N+ N− N2)/2 = N − N2,N2 − ν2 = (N1 + N2 − N3)/2 = N − N3 .

Next let us consider m = 4, where we do not order the Hermite indices Ni as yet. The reason is that the general Im expression was derived with a different grouping of the

Hermite polynomials than the separate calculation of I4 with which we compare. That is why we’ll have to permute the indices to get the earlier result for I4 . That is a general conclusion: Different groupings of the Hermite polynomials just give different permutations of the Hermite indices in the general result.

We have two summations over ν2 and νm−1 = ν3 , which is fixed by the constraint N1 =

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

In the last expression we have substituted ν3 and used

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

The Hermite polynomial product formula also applies to products of simple harmonic oscillator wave functions, Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRevwith a different exponential weight function. To evaluate such integrals we use the generalized Feldheim identity for HN2 ··· HNm in conjunction with the integral (see Gradshteyn and Ryzhik, p. 845, in the Additional Readings),

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

instead of the standard orthogonality integral for the remaining product of two Hermite polynomials. Here the hypergeometric function is the finite sum

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

This yields a result similar to The oscillator potential has also been employed extensively in calculations of nuclear structure (nuclear shell model) quark models of hadrons and the nuclear force.
There is a second independent solution of Eq. (13.13). This Hermite function of the second kind is an infinite series (Sections 9.5 and 9.6) and is of no physical interest, at least not yet.

 

In developing the properties of the Hermite polynomials, start at a number of different points, such as:
1. Hermite’s ODE, Eq. (13.13),
2. Rodrigues’ formula, Eq. (13.7),
3. Integral representation, Eq. (13.8),
4. Generating function, Eq. (13.1),
5. Gram–Schmidt construction of a complete set of orthogonal polynomials over (−∞, ∞) with a weighting factor of exp(−x 2 ), Section 10.3.
Outline how you can go from any one of these starting points to all the other points.

 

Excercise

(a) Expand x 2r in a series of even-order Hermite polynomials.

(b) Expand x 2r +1 in a series of odd-order Hermite polynomials.

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

Hint. Use a Rodrigues representation and integrate by parts.

 

Evaluate

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

in terms of n and m and appropriate Kronecker delta functions.

Hermite and Laguerre Special Functions (Part - 1)- Mathematical Methods of Physics, UGC -NET Physics Physics Notes | EduRev

(a) Using the Cauchy integral formula, develop an integral representation of H(x ) based on Eq. (13.1) with the contour enclosing the point z =−x .

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