Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work" Computer Stuff Notes | EduRev

: Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work" Computer Stuff Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
  
 
  Computer Stuff 
   
  Auto Stuff   
  Electronics Stuff 
   
  Science Stuff 
   
  Home Stuff 
   
   Stuffo 
   
  Health Stuff 
   
  Money Stuff 
   
  Travel Stuff 
   
  People Stuff 
   
Main > Auto > Under the Hood 
Click here to go back to the normal view!
How Clutches Work
by Karim Nice
If you drive a manual transmission car, you may be surprised to find out that your car has more than 
one clutch in it. And it turns out that folks with automatic transmission cars have clutches, too. In fact, 
there are clutches in many things you probably see or use everyday: Many cordless drills have a 
clutch, chainsaws have a centrifugal clutch and even some yo-yos have a clutch! 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (1 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Page 2


Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
  
 
  Computer Stuff 
   
  Auto Stuff   
  Electronics Stuff 
   
  Science Stuff 
   
  Home Stuff 
   
   Stuffo 
   
  Health Stuff 
   
  Money Stuff 
   
  Travel Stuff 
   
  People Stuff 
   
Main > Auto > Under the Hood 
Click here to go back to the normal view!
How Clutches Work
by Karim Nice
If you drive a manual transmission car, you may be surprised to find out that your car has more than 
one clutch in it. And it turns out that folks with automatic transmission cars have clutches, too. In fact, 
there are clutches in many things you probably see or use everyday: Many cordless drills have a 
clutch, chainsaws have a centrifugal clutch and even some yo-yos have a clutch! 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (1 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
Diagram of car showing clutch location
In this article, we will learn why you need a clutch, understand how the clutch in your car works, and 
talk about some interesting and perhaps surprising places where clutches can be found! 
Why Do We Need Clutches?
Clutches are useful in devices with two rotating shafts. In these devices, one of the shafts is 
typically driven by a motor or pulley, and the other shaft is driving another device. In a drill, for 
instance, one shaft is driven by a motor and the other is driving a drill chuck. The clutch connects the 
two shafts so that they can either be locked together and spin at the same speed, or be decoupled 
and spin at different speeds. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (2 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Page 3


Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
  
 
  Computer Stuff 
   
  Auto Stuff   
  Electronics Stuff 
   
  Science Stuff 
   
  Home Stuff 
   
   Stuffo 
   
  Health Stuff 
   
  Money Stuff 
   
  Travel Stuff 
   
  People Stuff 
   
Main > Auto > Under the Hood 
Click here to go back to the normal view!
How Clutches Work
by Karim Nice
If you drive a manual transmission car, you may be surprised to find out that your car has more than 
one clutch in it. And it turns out that folks with automatic transmission cars have clutches, too. In fact, 
there are clutches in many things you probably see or use everyday: Many cordless drills have a 
clutch, chainsaws have a centrifugal clutch and even some yo-yos have a clutch! 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (1 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
Diagram of car showing clutch location
In this article, we will learn why you need a clutch, understand how the clutch in your car works, and 
talk about some interesting and perhaps surprising places where clutches can be found! 
Why Do We Need Clutches?
Clutches are useful in devices with two rotating shafts. In these devices, one of the shafts is 
typically driven by a motor or pulley, and the other shaft is driving another device. In a drill, for 
instance, one shaft is driven by a motor and the other is driving a drill chuck. The clutch connects the 
two shafts so that they can either be locked together and spin at the same speed, or be decoupled 
and spin at different speeds. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (2 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
 
Basic clutch 
In a car, you need a clutch because the engine spins all the time and the car wheels don't. In order 
for a car to stop without killing the engine, the wheels need to be disconnected from the engine 
somehow. The clutch allows us to smoothly engage a spinning engine to a non-spinning transmission 
by controlling the slippage between them. To understand how a clutch works, it helps to know a little 
bit about friction. 
Automobile Clutch
In the figure below, you can see that the flywheel is connected to the engine, and the clutch plate is 
connected to the transmission. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (3 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Page 4


Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
  
 
  Computer Stuff 
   
  Auto Stuff   
  Electronics Stuff 
   
  Science Stuff 
   
  Home Stuff 
   
   Stuffo 
   
  Health Stuff 
   
  Money Stuff 
   
  Travel Stuff 
   
  People Stuff 
   
Main > Auto > Under the Hood 
Click here to go back to the normal view!
How Clutches Work
by Karim Nice
If you drive a manual transmission car, you may be surprised to find out that your car has more than 
one clutch in it. And it turns out that folks with automatic transmission cars have clutches, too. In fact, 
there are clutches in many things you probably see or use everyday: Many cordless drills have a 
clutch, chainsaws have a centrifugal clutch and even some yo-yos have a clutch! 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (1 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
Diagram of car showing clutch location
In this article, we will learn why you need a clutch, understand how the clutch in your car works, and 
talk about some interesting and perhaps surprising places where clutches can be found! 
Why Do We Need Clutches?
Clutches are useful in devices with two rotating shafts. In these devices, one of the shafts is 
typically driven by a motor or pulley, and the other shaft is driving another device. In a drill, for 
instance, one shaft is driven by a motor and the other is driving a drill chuck. The clutch connects the 
two shafts so that they can either be locked together and spin at the same speed, or be decoupled 
and spin at different speeds. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (2 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
 
Basic clutch 
In a car, you need a clutch because the engine spins all the time and the car wheels don't. In order 
for a car to stop without killing the engine, the wheels need to be disconnected from the engine 
somehow. The clutch allows us to smoothly engage a spinning engine to a non-spinning transmission 
by controlling the slippage between them. To understand how a clutch works, it helps to know a little 
bit about friction. 
Automobile Clutch
In the figure below, you can see that the flywheel is connected to the engine, and the clutch plate is 
connected to the transmission. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (3 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
 
Exploded view of car clutch 
When your foot is off the pedal, the springs push the pressure plate against the clutch disc, which 
in turn presses against the flywheel. This locks the engine to the transmission input shaft, causing 
them to spin at the same speed. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (4 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Page 5


Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
  
 
  Computer Stuff 
   
  Auto Stuff   
  Electronics Stuff 
   
  Science Stuff 
   
  Home Stuff 
   
   Stuffo 
   
  Health Stuff 
   
  Money Stuff 
   
  Travel Stuff 
   
  People Stuff 
   
Main > Auto > Under the Hood 
Click here to go back to the normal view!
How Clutches Work
by Karim Nice
If you drive a manual transmission car, you may be surprised to find out that your car has more than 
one clutch in it. And it turns out that folks with automatic transmission cars have clutches, too. In fact, 
there are clutches in many things you probably see or use everyday: Many cordless drills have a 
clutch, chainsaws have a centrifugal clutch and even some yo-yos have a clutch! 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (1 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
Diagram of car showing clutch location
In this article, we will learn why you need a clutch, understand how the clutch in your car works, and 
talk about some interesting and perhaps surprising places where clutches can be found! 
Why Do We Need Clutches?
Clutches are useful in devices with two rotating shafts. In these devices, one of the shafts is 
typically driven by a motor or pulley, and the other shaft is driving another device. In a drill, for 
instance, one shaft is driven by a motor and the other is driving a drill chuck. The clutch connects the 
two shafts so that they can either be locked together and spin at the same speed, or be decoupled 
and spin at different speeds. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (2 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
 
Basic clutch 
In a car, you need a clutch because the engine spins all the time and the car wheels don't. In order 
for a car to stop without killing the engine, the wheels need to be disconnected from the engine 
somehow. The clutch allows us to smoothly engage a spinning engine to a non-spinning transmission 
by controlling the slippage between them. To understand how a clutch works, it helps to know a little 
bit about friction. 
Automobile Clutch
In the figure below, you can see that the flywheel is connected to the engine, and the clutch plate is 
connected to the transmission. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (3 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
 
Exploded view of car clutch 
When your foot is off the pedal, the springs push the pressure plate against the clutch disc, which 
in turn presses against the flywheel. This locks the engine to the transmission input shaft, causing 
them to spin at the same speed. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (4 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Howstuffworks "How Clutches Work"
 
Photo courtesy Carolina Mustang
Pressure plate
Force and Friction
The amount of force the clutch can hold depends on the friction between the clutch plate and the 
flywheel, and how much force the spring puts on the pressure plate. The friction force in the clutch 
works just like the blocks in the friction section of How Brakes Work, except that the spring presses 
on the clutch plate instead of weight pressing the block into the ground. 
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/clutch.htm/printable (5 of 11)1/30/2003 8:37:04 PM
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!