Introduction to Composite Materials and Structures Notes | EduRev

: Introduction to Composite Materials and Structures Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


IntroductiontoComposite Introduction to Composite 
Materials and Structures
NachiketaTiwari Nachiketa Tiwari
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Page 2


IntroductiontoComposite Introduction to Composite 
Materials and Structures
NachiketaTiwari Nachiketa Tiwari
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Lecture 33
Hygrothermal Effects
Page 3


IntroductiontoComposite Introduction to Composite 
Materials and Structures
NachiketaTiwari Nachiketa Tiwari
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Lecture 33
Hygrothermal Effects
Sources of Hygrothermal Stresses
• Most composites materials are cured by application of heat. In other 
cases,whenexternalheatisnotapplied,thecuringprocessitself cases, when external heat is not applied, the curing process itself 
produces significant heat due to onset of exothermic reactions.
• Priortocuring resinisinaviscousfluidic stateandthus composite • Prior to curing, resin is in a viscous fluidic state and thus, composite 
constituents are reasonably free to move with respect to each other. 
However, once curing process is complete, the matrix gets solidified, and it 
nolongerpermits stress-freemotionofdifferentconstituentmaterials no longer permits stress-free motion of different constituent materials. 
• However, at the time of curing, bulk temperature of composite is 
iifi l hi h(d li i f lh d i significantly high (due to application of external heat or due to generation 
of heat attributable to exothermic curing reactive process). Thus, the 
position of different composite constituents gets “locked-in” at an 
elevatedtemperature elevated temperature.
• As composite product cools down to room temperature, thermal stresses
get generated due to differences in CTE of constituent materials of 
composite.
Page 4


IntroductiontoComposite Introduction to Composite 
Materials and Structures
NachiketaTiwari Nachiketa Tiwari
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Lecture 33
Hygrothermal Effects
Sources of Hygrothermal Stresses
• Most composites materials are cured by application of heat. In other 
cases,whenexternalheatisnotapplied,thecuringprocessitself cases, when external heat is not applied, the curing process itself 
produces significant heat due to onset of exothermic reactions.
• Priortocuring resinisinaviscousfluidic stateandthus composite • Prior to curing, resin is in a viscous fluidic state and thus, composite 
constituents are reasonably free to move with respect to each other. 
However, once curing process is complete, the matrix gets solidified, and it 
nolongerpermits stress-freemotionofdifferentconstituentmaterials no longer permits stress-free motion of different constituent materials. 
• However, at the time of curing, bulk temperature of composite is 
iifi l hi h(d li i f lh d i significantly high (due to application of external heat or due to generation 
of heat attributable to exothermic curing reactive process). Thus, the 
position of different composite constituents gets “locked-in” at an 
elevatedtemperature elevated temperature.
• As composite product cools down to room temperature, thermal stresses
get generated due to differences in CTE of constituent materials of 
composite.
Sources of Hygrothermal Stresses
• Thus, almost all composite materials have a certain level of in situthermal 
stressesowingtheirexistence tothecompositemanufacturingprocess stresses owing their existence to the composite manufacturing process. 
• Similar stresses also exist in composites with thermoplastic resins, as 
processing and solidification temperatures of these resins is significantly 
higher than composite use temperatures.
• The magnitude of thermal stresses increases with increasing temperature 
difference between curing temperature, and composite use temperature. 
• Thus, the level of thermal stresses in a composite sample used at 
cryogenictemperaturesmaybehigher thanthatinasample subjectedto cryogenic temperatures may be higher, than that in a sample  subjected to 
room temperature. For a similar reason, detailed thermal stress analysis 
calculations have to be conducted on aircraft turbine blades, and missile 
nosecones whereambienttemperaturesmaybeinexcessof1000C nose cones, where ambient temperatures may be in excess of 1000 C.
Page 5


IntroductiontoComposite Introduction to Composite 
Materials and Structures
NachiketaTiwari Nachiketa Tiwari
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Lecture 33
Hygrothermal Effects
Sources of Hygrothermal Stresses
• Most composites materials are cured by application of heat. In other 
cases,whenexternalheatisnotapplied,thecuringprocessitself cases, when external heat is not applied, the curing process itself 
produces significant heat due to onset of exothermic reactions.
• Priortocuring resinisinaviscousfluidic stateandthus composite • Prior to curing, resin is in a viscous fluidic state and thus, composite 
constituents are reasonably free to move with respect to each other. 
However, once curing process is complete, the matrix gets solidified, and it 
nolongerpermits stress-freemotionofdifferentconstituentmaterials no longer permits stress-free motion of different constituent materials. 
• However, at the time of curing, bulk temperature of composite is 
iifi l hi h(d li i f lh d i significantly high (due to application of external heat or due to generation 
of heat attributable to exothermic curing reactive process). Thus, the 
position of different composite constituents gets “locked-in” at an 
elevatedtemperature elevated temperature.
• As composite product cools down to room temperature, thermal stresses
get generated due to differences in CTE of constituent materials of 
composite.
Sources of Hygrothermal Stresses
• Thus, almost all composite materials have a certain level of in situthermal 
stressesowingtheirexistence tothecompositemanufacturingprocess stresses owing their existence to the composite manufacturing process. 
• Similar stresses also exist in composites with thermoplastic resins, as 
processing and solidification temperatures of these resins is significantly 
higher than composite use temperatures.
• The magnitude of thermal stresses increases with increasing temperature 
difference between curing temperature, and composite use temperature. 
• Thus, the level of thermal stresses in a composite sample used at 
cryogenictemperaturesmaybehigher thanthatinasample subjectedto cryogenic temperatures may be higher, than that in a sample  subjected to 
room temperature. For a similar reason, detailed thermal stress analysis 
calculations have to be conducted on aircraft turbine blades, and missile 
nosecones whereambienttemperaturesmaybeinexcessof1000C nose cones, where ambient temperatures may be in excess of 1000 C.
Sources of Hygrothermal Stresses
• Composites are also sensitive to presence of moisture and humidity. 
Unlikemetals whichdonotabsorbmoisture averylargenumberof Unlike metals, which do not absorb moisture, a very large number of 
composites absorb moisture.  This is because several polymer based 
matrix materials absorb moisture.
• While all polymers do absorb some amount of moisture, nylons in 
particularhaveoneofthehighestpropensitytoabsorbmoisture. particular have one of the highest propensity to absorb moisture. 
Depending on their grade, these materials, at 50% RH, can absorb as much 
water weighing as much as 0.7 to 2.7%  of their weights. At 100% RH, 
thesevaluesincreaseto14to95% these values increase to 1.4 to 9.5%.
• Moisture absorption, besides other effects, also is a source of internal 
stresses in the composite. 
• Stressesincompositesduetotemperatureandmoisturearecollectively • Stresses in composites due to temperature and moisture are collectively 
termed as hygrothermal stresses.
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!