Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Class 9: Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

The document Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9 is a part of the Class 9 Course Class 9 Science by VP Classes.
All you need of Class 9 at this link: Class 9

Q1. Pressure and temperature determine the state of a substance. Explain this in detail.
 Ans. 
(1) Any matter i.e., solid, liquid or gas when experiences an increase in temperature they change their state. Example:

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Take ice cubes in a beaker or heat them slowly, the temperature increases and the ice melts to form liquid. Heat this liquid further it will becomesteam.

(2) On lowering down the temperature of any matter, show change in their state.

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Take the steam that is coming out of a boiling water and allow it to cool down, it condenses to form water and on further cooling of this water we get ice.

(3) On applying pressure and reducing temperature we can liquefy gases or change them into solid. Example: Take carbon-dioxide gas, reduce its temperature and apply lot of pressure on it so that it changes into solid carbon dioxide, called dry ice, which is used as refrigerant for cooling. If the pressure on it is further decreased it directly changes into gas. In LPG cylinders, the petroleum gas is first cooled and further lot of pressure change is applied to it into liquid state. While using this LPG, we release the pressure exerted on it and hence it comes out in the form of gas. 

Q2. Explain giving examples the various factors on which rate of evaporation depends.
 Ans. 
The rate of evaporation depends on the following factors:

(1) Surface area: If the surface area is increased the rate of evaporation also increases.
(a) To dry the clothes we spread them to dry faster.
(b) Tea in saucer cools faster than in a cup.

(2) Temperature: If the temperature is increased the rate of evaporation also increases. Due to increase in temperature the particles gain more kinetic energy and change their phase from liquid to gaseous. Water will evaporate faster in sun than in shade.

(3) Humidity: It is the amount of water vapour present in air. The air can hold definite amount of water vapour, at a given temperature. If the amount of water vapour is high in the air then the rate of evaporation decreases. On hot and humid day, desert coolers are not effective as the air cannot hold anymore moisture to get the cooling effect.

(4) Wind speed: With the increase in wind speed, the rate of evaporation increases. The particles of water vapour move away with the wind, decreasing the amount of water vapour in the surrounding.

Q3. Cooking gas is often stored and delivered in steel bottles. Over a period of time pressure of the gas in the steel bottles does not change.
 Air and helium are gases that are often used to fill rubber balloons. Over a period of time balloons gradually shrink. Explain these observations.
 Ans.
The molecules of gas exert pressure on the walls of the container. The steel containers have a wall strong enough to withstand the pressure of the gas but the walls of the balloon are not that rigid and hence shrinks.

Q4. The observations given below determine whether the changes described are likely to involve the formation of new combinations of matter, or are physical changes. Analyse.

ObservationChemical or PhysicalScientifically Supported Judgements
1. Edge of towel hanging in a wet bath draws up water.  
2. A fire cracker explodes. Producing noise, smell and smoke  
3. Pink colored copper tap becomes green over a period of time.  
4. . Glass of car windscreen gets all water droplets on inner surface.  

Ans.

ObservationChemical or PhysicalScientifically Supported Judgements
1. Edge of towel hanging in a wet bath draws up water.PhysicalNo new substance formed
2. A fire cracker explodes. Producing noise, smell and smokeChemicalHeat involved and new product formed
3. Pink colored copper tap becomes green over a period of time.ChemicalNew compound formed
4. . Glass of car windscreen gets all water droplets on inner surface.PhysicalNo new substance formed

 

Activity-Based Questions 

1. 

  • Take 2-3 crystals of potassium permanganate and dissolve them in 100 ml of water.
  • Take out approximately 10 ml of this solution and put in into another 90 ml of clear water.
  • Take out 10 ml of this solution and put it into another 90 ml of clear water.
  • Keep diluting the solution like this 5 to 8 times.
  • Is the water still coloured?

Observation: Yes, the water is still coloured but its colour has faded in each dilution. This experiment shows that just a few crystals of potassium permanganate can colour a large volume of water. This is because potassium permanganate (matter) is made up of millions of tiny particles.

2.

  • Take a 100 ml beaker.
  • Fill half the beaker with water and mark the level of water.
  • Dissolve some salt/sugar with the help of a glass rod.
  • What do you think has happened to the salt?
  • Where does it disappear?
  • Does the level of water change?

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Observations:

  • The salt get dissolved in water.
  • The particles of salt get into the spaces between particles of water.
  • The level of water does not change as the salt particles occupy the intermolecular space between the water molecules.

3. 

  • Put an unlit incense stick in a corner of your class. How close do you have to go so as to get its smell?
  • Now light the incense stick. What happens? Do you get the smell sitting at a distance?
  • Record your observation.

    Observation: 
  • To smell the unlit incense stick one has to go very close to sense its smell.
  • In case of lit incense stick, even if you are sitting at a distance, you get the smell. This is because the particles of matter on gaining heat energy start moving faster and vibrate, diffuse in all possible directions due to increased kinetic energy.

4. 

  • Take two glasses/beakers filled with water.
  • Put a drop of blue or red ink slowly and carefully along the sides of the first beaker and honey in the same way in the second beaker.
  • Leave them undisturbed in your house or in a corner in the class.
  • Record your observation.
  • What do you observe immediately after adding the ink drop?
  • What do you observe immediately after adding a drop of honey?
  • How many hours or days does it take for the colour of ink to spread evenly throughout the water?

     Observation: 
  • The beaker in which ink drops are added, the ink diffuses completely in the water within 5−10 minutes.
  • The beaker in which honey is added in water, takes longer time for diffusion.
  • This activity shows that viscous or dense liquids take longer time for diffusion as compared to the liquids which are not viscous.

5. 

  • Drop a crystal of copper sulphate or potassium permanganate into a glass of hot water and another containing cold water. Do not stir the solution. Allow the crystals to settle at the bottom.
  •  What do you observe just above the solid crystals in the glass?
  • What happens as time passes?
  • What does this suggest about the particles of solid and liquid?
  • Does the rate of mixing change with temperature? Why and how?

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Observation:

  •  In the hot water just above the crystals, the blue colour appears to be intermingling at very fast rate and gets diffused in the water. Within minutes the copper sulphate dissolves in it.
  • In the cold water, just above the crystal, the intermingling of copper sulphate is not visible and the rate of diffusion is very slow in it.
  • This shows that with the increase in temperature the rate of diffusion increases.

6. 

  • Take an iron nail, a piece of chalk and a rubber band.
  • Try breaking them by hammering, cutting or stretching.
  • In which of the above three substances do you think the particles are held together with greater force?

    Observation: 
  • It is very easy to cut the rubber band.
  • The chalk piece also breaks into 2 pieces with hand.
  • The iron nail is difficult to be broken into two pieces.
  • This shows that the iron particles are held together tightly and need extra effort to break them. The particles of chalk and rubber band are not that tightly held and hence, it can be broken easily

7.

  • Take some water in a container, try cutting the surface of water with your fingers.
  • Were you able to cut the surface of water?
  • What could be the reason behind the surface of water remaining together?

    Observation: One cannot cut the surface of water because the molecules of water are held by force of attraction and hand cannot spread or cut or break this force of attraction between the molecules.

8.

  • Collect the following articles—a pen, a book, a needle and a piece of wooden stick.
  • Sketch the shape of the above articles in your notebook by moving a pencil around them.
  • Do all these have a definite shape, distinct boundaries and a fixed volume?
  • What happens if they are hammered, pulled or dropped?
  • Are they capable of diffusing into each other?
  • Try compressing them by applying force. Are you able to compress them?

    Observation: 
  • All the articles given i.e., a pen, a book, a needle, and a piece of wooden stick have definite shape, distinct boundaries and a fixed volume.
  • Above articles may break under external force but it is difficult to change their shape.
  • These objects cannot diffuse in each other, nor can they be compressed.
  • All the articles have characteristics of solid.

9. Collect the following: 

(a) Water, cooking oil, milk, juice and cold drink.

(b) Take containers of different shapes. Put a 50 ml mark on these containers using a measuring cylinder from the laboratory.

  • What will happen if these liquids are spilt on the floor?
  • Measure 50 ml of any one liquid and transfer it into different containers one by one. Does the volume remain the same?
  • Does the shape of the liquid remain the same?
  • When you pour the liquid from one container into another, does it flow easily?

    Observation: 
  • If these liquids are spilled over on the floor, these liquids will flow.
  • Let us put in any container, it takes the shape of the container but the volume remains the same.
  • On pouring liquid from one container to another, the liquids flow easily.

10.

  • Take three 100 ml syringes and close their nozzles by rubber corks.
  • Remove the pistons from all the syringes.
  • Leavingone syringeuntouched,fillwater inthe secondandpieces of chalk in the third.
  • Insert the pistons back into the syringes. You may apply some vaseline on the pistons before inserting them into the syringes for their smooth movement.
  • Now try to compress the content by pushing the piston in each syringe.
  • What do you observe? In which case was the piston easily pushed in?
  • What do you infer from your observation?

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Observation:

  • The piston is pushed in easily in the syringe containing air.
  • The piston is pushed with very difficulty in the syringe containing chalk pieces. Inference: Gases are highly compressible followed by liquids but solids are non-compressible.

11.

  • Take about 150 g of ice in a beaker and suspend a laboratory thermometer so that its bulb is in contact with the ice, as shown in the figure.

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

  •  Start heating the beaker on a low flame.
  • Note the temperature when the ice melts
  • Note the temperature when all the ice has converted into water.
  • Record your observations for this conversion of solid to liquid state.
  • Now, put a glass rod in the beaker and heat while stirring till the water starts boiling.
  • Keep a careful eye on the thermometer reading till most of the water has vaporised.
  • Record your observations for the conversion of water in the liquid state to the gaseous state.

    Observation: 
  • The ice starts melting at 0°C when the temperature increases slowly, the entire ice melts and the water is formed in the beaker.
  • Water is heated continuously and at 100°C the water starts boiling and changes into gaseous state. On further heating for few more minutes, the temperature remains the same, but water boils and gets converted into steam.

    Inference: 
  • The temperature at which solid changes into liquid is called its melting point.
  • The temperature at which liquid changes into vapour or gaseous form is called its boiling point.
  • The extra heat supplied to liquid even when it had attained its boiling point, this extra heat remains hidden in the gaseous state and is called latent heat of vaporisation. The temperature of water therefore does not change inspite of supplying it extra heat.

12. 

  • Take some camphor or ammonium chloride. Crush it and put it in a China dish.
  • Put an inverted funnel over the China dish.
  • Put a cotton plug on the stem of the funnel as shown in the figure.
  • Now heat slowly and observe.
  • What do you infer from the above activity.

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Observation: On the stem of the funnel and near the cotton plug, solidified ammonium chloride is collected on heating the china dish. This solid ammonium chloride did not enter the phase of liquids i.e., it did not melt but fumes/vapours on heating the china dish, containing ammonium chloride, were collected on the stem of the funnel as solidified ammonium chloride again.

Inference: A solid on heating changed into a gas without changing into liquid state. This process is called sublimation.

 

Value-Based Questions 

Q1. Adil parked his bicycle on a sunny day in a parking stand of his school campus. When the school got over Adil saw his burst cycle tyre. Thereafter he kept less air in his cycle tyres and did not inflate them fully.
 (a) Why did the tyre burst?
 (b) Why is air compressible?
 (c) What value of Adil is reflected in the above act?
 Ans.
(a) The tyre burst because the air inside the tyre got heated and therefore exerted greater pressure on the walls of the tyre.
(b) Air is compressible because it has large intermolecular space.
(c) Adil showed the value of intelligence, awareness and self responsibility. 

Q2. Akshay’s friend visited his house in Mumbai and he was surprised to see air conditioners installed in all of his rooms. His friend advised Akshay to use watercoolers and save electricity. On this Akshay told him that the water-cooler is not at all effective in coastal areas.
 (a) Why are water-cooler not effective in coastal areas?
 (b) What are the other two factors on which evaporation of water depends?
 (c) What value of Akshay’s friend is seen in this act?
 Ans. 
(a) Water coolers are not effective in coastal areas due to high humidity.
(b) The other two factors on which evaporation of water depends are temperature and surface area.
(c) Akshay’s friend showed the value of concerned citizen, morally responsible and friendly in nature.

Q3. Sita lived in a village and could not afford refrigerator in her house. She knew how to keep water cold and preserve all perishable items in her house. She kept wet cloth surrounding the earthen pot to keep water cool, she also kept vegetables fresh by keeping them in wet gunny bag and timely sprinkled water over it.
 (a) Why did Sita keep wet cloth surrounding the earthen pot?
 (b) Suggest one more method of keeping the house cool in summer.
 (c) What value of Sita is reflected in the above case?
 Ans.
(a) The wet cloth gave the cooling effect to the pot, as the water in the cloth evaporated and evaporation causes cooling effect. (b) By sprinkling some water on the lawn/veranda of the house can keep the house cool. (c) Sita showed the value of responsible behaviour.

Q4. Shreya commutes in a CNG fitted van to school every day along with many other students. She told the van driver to get the CNG connection certified and timely checked it for any leakage or loose connection of pipes. She told the driver to be more careful during summers.
 (a) What is CNG?
 (b) Why should one be more careful with CNG cylinders during summer?
 (c) What value of Shreya is seen in the above act?
 Ans.
(a) CNG is Compressed Natural Gas used as fuel.
(b) During summers, the CNG connections and cylinder need to be checked because the gas expands due to heat and if there would be any leakage then it would cause fire in the vehicle.
(c) Shreya showed the value of concerned citizen and morally responsible behaviour

 

Practical Based Questions (Solved) 

Q1. How many grams of magnesium bromide are needed to make 1.0 L of a 4.0 M magnesium bromide solution?

Ans.Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

Q2. What are the three different types of mixtures? Define each one.
 Ans.
Suspensions, Colloids, and Solutions. Suspensions: A suspension is a heterogeneous mixture containing particles that are distinct from the surrounding medium. Colloids: A colloid is a suspension in which a solute-like phase is dispersed throughout a solvent-like phase. Solutions: A solution is a liquid mixture in which the minor component (the solute) is uniformly distributed within the major component (the solvent).

Q3. How is a solution different from the other two types of mixtures?
 Ans.
A solution is different from the other types of mixtures as it is homogeneous. While a suspension is made up of different phases and a colloid is made up of two distinct, different phases. A solution is made up of a solute and a solvent and solution cannot be separated easily into its components.

Q4. Describe (in detail) the three steps involved in solution formation.
 Ans. Step 1: 
Take a required amount of solvent in a beaker
Step 2: Add the required amount of solute into it.
Step 3: Stir the solute into the solvent till it gets completely dissolved in it, if needed you may heat it for fast dissolution.

Q5. Use the solubility graph below to answer the following questions

Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9

(a) Which salt is least soluble at 20°C?
 (b) How many grams of KBr can be dissolved in 100g of water at 60°C?
 (c) How many grams of NaCl can be dissolved in 100 g of water at 100°C?
 (d) Classify the type of solution: At 40°C, 180g of NaClO3 is dissolved in 100g of water.
 (e) Classify the type of solution: At 70°C, 70g of KBr is dissolved in 100g of water.
 Ans.
(a) KNO3
(b) 80-90g
(c) 40g
(d) It is supersaturated
(e) unsaturated

Q6. Not all solutions of solids are dissolved in liquids. Provide two examples of other types of solutions other than this.
 Ans. 
(a) Gas dissolved in liquid: CO2 in H2O (carbonated beverage). (b) Solid dissolved in solid: Alloys like steel solution of carbon atoms in iron atoms

Q7. How could you tell by looking at a solution that it was saturated?
 Ans. 
If the additional solute is added and it remains undissolved the solution can be considered as saturated. 

Q8. What is the Tyndall Effect? Cite a common example of this effect.
 Ans.
The Tyndall Effect occurs when light is scattered by particles in a colloid or particles in a fine suspension. For example—The sky appears blue due to the scattering of light by dust particles suspended in it.

Q9. Given an unknown mixture consisting of two substances, explain how a scientist could use lab techniques to determine whether the mixture is a true solution, a colloid, or a suspension.
 Ans.
If the unknown mixture can be separated by filtration then it is a suspension. If the scattering of light by the particles is observed then it is a colloid. Otherwise all others are true solutions.

The document Long Answers - Matter In Our Surroundings, Science, Class 9 Notes | Study Class 9 Science by VP Classes - Class 9 is a part of the Class 9 Course Class 9 Science by VP Classes.
All you need of Class 9 at this link: Class 9

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