NCERT Textbook - Introduction Class 10 Notes | EduRev

Class 10 : NCERT Textbook - Introduction Class 10 Notes | EduRev

Created by: C K Academy
 Page 1


1
Introduction...Do you remember
Do you know that any of these disasters could hit your area at any time,
with or without any warning?
People have been living with risk ever since they first joined efforts, shared resources and assumed
responsibilities in social groups. Social development and human well being have advanced only
because people have taken risk. Time and again, we see the terrible toll that natural disasters inflict
on vulnerable communities around the world. Over the recent decades there has been an alarming
increase in the occurrence of natural disasters and the magnitude of their social, economic and
environmental impacts. This extensive damage to lives, property and livelihood of the affected
communities has turned back the development clock of the areas by decades.
But are we apathetic towards disasters?
The answer is ‘No’. The recent Kumbakonam fire tragedy in Tamilnadu that killed 93 innocent
lives has made us all think about “our lives” which is precious.  The recurring floods in
Assam and Bihar, frequent drought in Rajasthan and Gujarat and the 2001 earthquake
in Gujarat have disrupted the normal life of people across the country. Disasters
are as old as human history. They have been mostly dealt with from a purely
humanitarian angle, while natural hazards such as cyclones; floods,
Introduction...Do you remember
1.
Page 2


1
Introduction...Do you remember
Do you know that any of these disasters could hit your area at any time,
with or without any warning?
People have been living with risk ever since they first joined efforts, shared resources and assumed
responsibilities in social groups. Social development and human well being have advanced only
because people have taken risk. Time and again, we see the terrible toll that natural disasters inflict
on vulnerable communities around the world. Over the recent decades there has been an alarming
increase in the occurrence of natural disasters and the magnitude of their social, economic and
environmental impacts. This extensive damage to lives, property and livelihood of the affected
communities has turned back the development clock of the areas by decades.
But are we apathetic towards disasters?
The answer is ‘No’. The recent Kumbakonam fire tragedy in Tamilnadu that killed 93 innocent
lives has made us all think about “our lives” which is precious.  The recurring floods in
Assam and Bihar, frequent drought in Rajasthan and Gujarat and the 2001 earthquake
in Gujarat have disrupted the normal life of people across the country. Disasters
are as old as human history. They have been mostly dealt with from a purely
humanitarian angle, while natural hazards such as cyclones; floods,
Introduction...Do you remember
1.
2
droughts and earthquakes have been analyzed technically and scientifically within scientific disciplines.
Disasters can no longer be seen as ‘acts of God’ or ‘acts of nature’ over which we have little control
nor can we leave disasters to be understood by natural scientists. It is high time that we as responsible
future citizens of our country think of it and get ourselves prepared for a safer tomorrow.
Knowing about risk that lead to disasters, understanding how they affect our livelihoods and environment
and dedicating collective efforts to manage those conditions. This book on Disaster Management,
“Together Towards a Safer India – Part III” aims at stimulating the students and the teachers by
transacting through case studies on various hazards. Let us analyze some of the major disasters that
have created havoc with huge loss to life and property and how the affected communities have been
able to cope up with it. Let’s learn from the past experiences and get our-selves prepared. This chapter
gives an overview of all the chapters that has been covered in this book.
Just one year to the day that an earthquake hit Bam, the dusty desert town in southern Iran, nature
struck again on Sunday (December 26). The strongest earthquake in the world for 40 years struck
under the sea north-west of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Massive sea surges (tsunamis) spread
from its epicenter bringing death and destruction to the coastal areas of south and south-east Asian
countries ringing the Indian ocean. Waves ranging in size from 10 ft. to 30 ft. were reported  by
different witnesses. Water surged kilometers inside into many of the islands. Radio listeners who woke
to hear the news in morning were told 500 were feared dead, but by evening the number was
approaching 10,000 and still climbing. Many thousands more were missing or injured and millions
more displaced... Chapter 2 of the book aptly discusses the devastating killer waves that hit the
country disrupting the normal life and ways and measures to prevent oneself form them.
The Tragedy of Kumbakonam ….
Kumbakonam, July 16, the fire of sustenance turned into a mass pyre for children
between the ages of seven and nine with at least 93 getting charred to death, trapped
in their blazing thatched-roof classrooms in Saraswati Primary School. The fire started
in a kitchen on the ground floor when the mid-day meal for children was being cooked.
Fire fighters said that the victims stood no chance of survival as the blazing thatched
roof collapsed on the trapped children. The terrible tragedy not only jolted the pilgrim
town of Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu, but the entire nation.
“Prevention is better than cure”.
Page 3


1
Introduction...Do you remember
Do you know that any of these disasters could hit your area at any time,
with or without any warning?
People have been living with risk ever since they first joined efforts, shared resources and assumed
responsibilities in social groups. Social development and human well being have advanced only
because people have taken risk. Time and again, we see the terrible toll that natural disasters inflict
on vulnerable communities around the world. Over the recent decades there has been an alarming
increase in the occurrence of natural disasters and the magnitude of their social, economic and
environmental impacts. This extensive damage to lives, property and livelihood of the affected
communities has turned back the development clock of the areas by decades.
But are we apathetic towards disasters?
The answer is ‘No’. The recent Kumbakonam fire tragedy in Tamilnadu that killed 93 innocent
lives has made us all think about “our lives” which is precious.  The recurring floods in
Assam and Bihar, frequent drought in Rajasthan and Gujarat and the 2001 earthquake
in Gujarat have disrupted the normal life of people across the country. Disasters
are as old as human history. They have been mostly dealt with from a purely
humanitarian angle, while natural hazards such as cyclones; floods,
Introduction...Do you remember
1.
2
droughts and earthquakes have been analyzed technically and scientifically within scientific disciplines.
Disasters can no longer be seen as ‘acts of God’ or ‘acts of nature’ over which we have little control
nor can we leave disasters to be understood by natural scientists. It is high time that we as responsible
future citizens of our country think of it and get ourselves prepared for a safer tomorrow.
Knowing about risk that lead to disasters, understanding how they affect our livelihoods and environment
and dedicating collective efforts to manage those conditions. This book on Disaster Management,
“Together Towards a Safer India – Part III” aims at stimulating the students and the teachers by
transacting through case studies on various hazards. Let us analyze some of the major disasters that
have created havoc with huge loss to life and property and how the affected communities have been
able to cope up with it. Let’s learn from the past experiences and get our-selves prepared. This chapter
gives an overview of all the chapters that has been covered in this book.
Just one year to the day that an earthquake hit Bam, the dusty desert town in southern Iran, nature
struck again on Sunday (December 26). The strongest earthquake in the world for 40 years struck
under the sea north-west of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Massive sea surges (tsunamis) spread
from its epicenter bringing death and destruction to the coastal areas of south and south-east Asian
countries ringing the Indian ocean. Waves ranging in size from 10 ft. to 30 ft. were reported  by
different witnesses. Water surged kilometers inside into many of the islands. Radio listeners who woke
to hear the news in morning were told 500 were feared dead, but by evening the number was
approaching 10,000 and still climbing. Many thousands more were missing or injured and millions
more displaced... Chapter 2 of the book aptly discusses the devastating killer waves that hit the
country disrupting the normal life and ways and measures to prevent oneself form them.
The Tragedy of Kumbakonam ….
Kumbakonam, July 16, the fire of sustenance turned into a mass pyre for children
between the ages of seven and nine with at least 93 getting charred to death, trapped
in their blazing thatched-roof classrooms in Saraswati Primary School. The fire started
in a kitchen on the ground floor when the mid-day meal for children was being cooked.
Fire fighters said that the victims stood no chance of survival as the blazing thatched
roof collapsed on the trapped children. The terrible tragedy not only jolted the pilgrim
town of Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu, but the entire nation.
“Prevention is better than cure”.
3
Have you ever analyzed why did this tragic incident occur?
The local authorities who reached the site as soon as
they received the information said that the school
had no proper evacuation route and there was lack
of fire safety measures taken up by the school
authorities. Due to the lack of awareness among
the teachers, staff members and the children
present in the school, many precious lives were lost.
The local hospitals lacked the facilities to cope up with
huge number of burnt victims and the school children too
were not trained in first aid. No initiatives were taken
up by the authorities to review the structural safety
of school functioning in thatched rooms.
Talk to the Fire Service Department in your
area and find out if they have any such
training facilities. If ‘yes’ get yourself
trained now.
Yes, all of us. Each one of us has a role to play. It was important for the school principal along with
the other staff members to prepare the school disaster management plan and share it with the district
administration. They need to train the students on first aid, search and rescue and usage of fire
extinguishers. They too need to create awareness on the do’s and don’ts for fire and other hazards
that they are vulnerable to.
You can yourself be safe and also save the lives of your dear friends by knowing some of the “Survival
Skills” for search and rescue and first aid. Chapter 3 deals with the survival skills, which would give
you an insight into Search and Rescue measures that need to be taken during an emergency and First
Aid measures that need to be taken for burns, bleeding, snakebite, poisoning etc.
ACTIVITY
If you were one of the students in the classroom where these ninety-three children were
your dear friends, how would you have reacted to it and what steps would you have taken
up? Analyze it with your friends and teachers and paste your learnings on the notice board
of your classroom.
Yet another Example……. Landslide affecting the villages
Who is to be held responsible for it? Is it the
school administration, teachers or the children?
Dear Friends,
Join me today…
Karnataka’s Fire Department runs a
programme called SAFE (Students
Association of Fire Education) impart-
ing fire safety training to students.
www.karnatakafireservices.gov.in
Page 4


1
Introduction...Do you remember
Do you know that any of these disasters could hit your area at any time,
with or without any warning?
People have been living with risk ever since they first joined efforts, shared resources and assumed
responsibilities in social groups. Social development and human well being have advanced only
because people have taken risk. Time and again, we see the terrible toll that natural disasters inflict
on vulnerable communities around the world. Over the recent decades there has been an alarming
increase in the occurrence of natural disasters and the magnitude of their social, economic and
environmental impacts. This extensive damage to lives, property and livelihood of the affected
communities has turned back the development clock of the areas by decades.
But are we apathetic towards disasters?
The answer is ‘No’. The recent Kumbakonam fire tragedy in Tamilnadu that killed 93 innocent
lives has made us all think about “our lives” which is precious.  The recurring floods in
Assam and Bihar, frequent drought in Rajasthan and Gujarat and the 2001 earthquake
in Gujarat have disrupted the normal life of people across the country. Disasters
are as old as human history. They have been mostly dealt with from a purely
humanitarian angle, while natural hazards such as cyclones; floods,
Introduction...Do you remember
1.
2
droughts and earthquakes have been analyzed technically and scientifically within scientific disciplines.
Disasters can no longer be seen as ‘acts of God’ or ‘acts of nature’ over which we have little control
nor can we leave disasters to be understood by natural scientists. It is high time that we as responsible
future citizens of our country think of it and get ourselves prepared for a safer tomorrow.
Knowing about risk that lead to disasters, understanding how they affect our livelihoods and environment
and dedicating collective efforts to manage those conditions. This book on Disaster Management,
“Together Towards a Safer India – Part III” aims at stimulating the students and the teachers by
transacting through case studies on various hazards. Let us analyze some of the major disasters that
have created havoc with huge loss to life and property and how the affected communities have been
able to cope up with it. Let’s learn from the past experiences and get our-selves prepared. This chapter
gives an overview of all the chapters that has been covered in this book.
Just one year to the day that an earthquake hit Bam, the dusty desert town in southern Iran, nature
struck again on Sunday (December 26). The strongest earthquake in the world for 40 years struck
under the sea north-west of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Massive sea surges (tsunamis) spread
from its epicenter bringing death and destruction to the coastal areas of south and south-east Asian
countries ringing the Indian ocean. Waves ranging in size from 10 ft. to 30 ft. were reported  by
different witnesses. Water surged kilometers inside into many of the islands. Radio listeners who woke
to hear the news in morning were told 500 were feared dead, but by evening the number was
approaching 10,000 and still climbing. Many thousands more were missing or injured and millions
more displaced... Chapter 2 of the book aptly discusses the devastating killer waves that hit the
country disrupting the normal life and ways and measures to prevent oneself form them.
The Tragedy of Kumbakonam ….
Kumbakonam, July 16, the fire of sustenance turned into a mass pyre for children
between the ages of seven and nine with at least 93 getting charred to death, trapped
in their blazing thatched-roof classrooms in Saraswati Primary School. The fire started
in a kitchen on the ground floor when the mid-day meal for children was being cooked.
Fire fighters said that the victims stood no chance of survival as the blazing thatched
roof collapsed on the trapped children. The terrible tragedy not only jolted the pilgrim
town of Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu, but the entire nation.
“Prevention is better than cure”.
3
Have you ever analyzed why did this tragic incident occur?
The local authorities who reached the site as soon as
they received the information said that the school
had no proper evacuation route and there was lack
of fire safety measures taken up by the school
authorities. Due to the lack of awareness among
the teachers, staff members and the children
present in the school, many precious lives were lost.
The local hospitals lacked the facilities to cope up with
huge number of burnt victims and the school children too
were not trained in first aid. No initiatives were taken
up by the authorities to review the structural safety
of school functioning in thatched rooms.
Talk to the Fire Service Department in your
area and find out if they have any such
training facilities. If ‘yes’ get yourself
trained now.
Yes, all of us. Each one of us has a role to play. It was important for the school principal along with
the other staff members to prepare the school disaster management plan and share it with the district
administration. They need to train the students on first aid, search and rescue and usage of fire
extinguishers. They too need to create awareness on the do’s and don’ts for fire and other hazards
that they are vulnerable to.
You can yourself be safe and also save the lives of your dear friends by knowing some of the “Survival
Skills” for search and rescue and first aid. Chapter 3 deals with the survival skills, which would give
you an insight into Search and Rescue measures that need to be taken during an emergency and First
Aid measures that need to be taken for burns, bleeding, snakebite, poisoning etc.
ACTIVITY
If you were one of the students in the classroom where these ninety-three children were
your dear friends, how would you have reacted to it and what steps would you have taken
up? Analyze it with your friends and teachers and paste your learnings on the notice board
of your classroom.
Yet another Example……. Landslide affecting the villages
Who is to be held responsible for it? Is it the
school administration, teachers or the children?
Dear Friends,
Join me today…
Karnataka’s Fire Department runs a
programme called SAFE (Students
Association of Fire Education) impart-
ing fire safety training to students.
www.karnatakafireservices.gov.in
4
If you are residing in any of these areas, then look out for its safety. Know
the type of soil and if vulnerable move to a safer place.
Develop an evacuation plan for your locality in case you are prone to landslides.
From the above case study we need to realize the need for alternative communication
for carrying out search and rescue operations and also establish linkage with
various government and non-governmental agencies. Chapter 4 of the book
discusses about various alternative communication systems that exist in
the world of science and technology today. As this chapter is based
In the later half of August 1998, severe rains lashed the Himalayas, causing devastation in their wake.
On August 14, 69 people died in a landslide in Okhimath block (near Gutptkashi). A week later, the
entire village of Malpa, lying along the Kali River on the way from Dharchula to Lipu
Lekh, was swept away
Isn’t one-week time enough for the people of Malpa to evacuate? Probably there was no proper
communication given by authorities to villagers.
The death toll, 205, included road workers, porters, members of the border police, and five dozen
pilgrims returning from a yatra (pilgrimage) to Mount Kailash and Lake Mansarovar in Tibet (August
18). Two dozen more people died when Mansuna village in Rudraprayag district also disappeared
(August 19). In addition, the torrential rains demolished hundreds of homes and infrastructure and
intense winds also hampered rescue efforts.
Isn’t site selection important for carrying out constructions?
By August 20, the authorities began evacuating 50,000
residents of the Okhimath block, as rubble, debris, and
boulders had fallen into the Madmaheshwar River, a
tributary of the Mandakini, plugging it and causing the
formation of an artificial lake. Many houses that were
located in these vulnerable sites were washed away. As
the lake swelled, so did the danger, as a flash flood
would submerge two - dozen villages. The army cautioned
against blasting the artificial dam with dynamite, as the
sudden discharge would overwhelm the villages below.
Instead, the villagers suggested that the lake should be
left to erode naturally. Also, local villagers and social activists went on search and rescue expeditions,
while various NGOs scrambled to attend to the needy.
Don’t you think help from various agencies and community has helped in rapid search and rescue
operations?
In Dehradun and other large cities, generous people rallied to send aid to the victims of the landslides
and flooding that had afflicted the plains.
What do you think were the steps that were to be necessarily taken by the people and the administration?
Early warning to the villagers and the pilgrims regarding the weather, specialized training to the
villagers on search and rescue and first aid, construction of retaining walls on the hilly terrains would
have saved many precious lives.
Page 5


1
Introduction...Do you remember
Do you know that any of these disasters could hit your area at any time,
with or without any warning?
People have been living with risk ever since they first joined efforts, shared resources and assumed
responsibilities in social groups. Social development and human well being have advanced only
because people have taken risk. Time and again, we see the terrible toll that natural disasters inflict
on vulnerable communities around the world. Over the recent decades there has been an alarming
increase in the occurrence of natural disasters and the magnitude of their social, economic and
environmental impacts. This extensive damage to lives, property and livelihood of the affected
communities has turned back the development clock of the areas by decades.
But are we apathetic towards disasters?
The answer is ‘No’. The recent Kumbakonam fire tragedy in Tamilnadu that killed 93 innocent
lives has made us all think about “our lives” which is precious.  The recurring floods in
Assam and Bihar, frequent drought in Rajasthan and Gujarat and the 2001 earthquake
in Gujarat have disrupted the normal life of people across the country. Disasters
are as old as human history. They have been mostly dealt with from a purely
humanitarian angle, while natural hazards such as cyclones; floods,
Introduction...Do you remember
1.
2
droughts and earthquakes have been analyzed technically and scientifically within scientific disciplines.
Disasters can no longer be seen as ‘acts of God’ or ‘acts of nature’ over which we have little control
nor can we leave disasters to be understood by natural scientists. It is high time that we as responsible
future citizens of our country think of it and get ourselves prepared for a safer tomorrow.
Knowing about risk that lead to disasters, understanding how they affect our livelihoods and environment
and dedicating collective efforts to manage those conditions. This book on Disaster Management,
“Together Towards a Safer India – Part III” aims at stimulating the students and the teachers by
transacting through case studies on various hazards. Let us analyze some of the major disasters that
have created havoc with huge loss to life and property and how the affected communities have been
able to cope up with it. Let’s learn from the past experiences and get our-selves prepared. This chapter
gives an overview of all the chapters that has been covered in this book.
Just one year to the day that an earthquake hit Bam, the dusty desert town in southern Iran, nature
struck again on Sunday (December 26). The strongest earthquake in the world for 40 years struck
under the sea north-west of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Massive sea surges (tsunamis) spread
from its epicenter bringing death and destruction to the coastal areas of south and south-east Asian
countries ringing the Indian ocean. Waves ranging in size from 10 ft. to 30 ft. were reported  by
different witnesses. Water surged kilometers inside into many of the islands. Radio listeners who woke
to hear the news in morning were told 500 were feared dead, but by evening the number was
approaching 10,000 and still climbing. Many thousands more were missing or injured and millions
more displaced... Chapter 2 of the book aptly discusses the devastating killer waves that hit the
country disrupting the normal life and ways and measures to prevent oneself form them.
The Tragedy of Kumbakonam ….
Kumbakonam, July 16, the fire of sustenance turned into a mass pyre for children
between the ages of seven and nine with at least 93 getting charred to death, trapped
in their blazing thatched-roof classrooms in Saraswati Primary School. The fire started
in a kitchen on the ground floor when the mid-day meal for children was being cooked.
Fire fighters said that the victims stood no chance of survival as the blazing thatched
roof collapsed on the trapped children. The terrible tragedy not only jolted the pilgrim
town of Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu, but the entire nation.
“Prevention is better than cure”.
3
Have you ever analyzed why did this tragic incident occur?
The local authorities who reached the site as soon as
they received the information said that the school
had no proper evacuation route and there was lack
of fire safety measures taken up by the school
authorities. Due to the lack of awareness among
the teachers, staff members and the children
present in the school, many precious lives were lost.
The local hospitals lacked the facilities to cope up with
huge number of burnt victims and the school children too
were not trained in first aid. No initiatives were taken
up by the authorities to review the structural safety
of school functioning in thatched rooms.
Talk to the Fire Service Department in your
area and find out if they have any such
training facilities. If ‘yes’ get yourself
trained now.
Yes, all of us. Each one of us has a role to play. It was important for the school principal along with
the other staff members to prepare the school disaster management plan and share it with the district
administration. They need to train the students on first aid, search and rescue and usage of fire
extinguishers. They too need to create awareness on the do’s and don’ts for fire and other hazards
that they are vulnerable to.
You can yourself be safe and also save the lives of your dear friends by knowing some of the “Survival
Skills” for search and rescue and first aid. Chapter 3 deals with the survival skills, which would give
you an insight into Search and Rescue measures that need to be taken during an emergency and First
Aid measures that need to be taken for burns, bleeding, snakebite, poisoning etc.
ACTIVITY
If you were one of the students in the classroom where these ninety-three children were
your dear friends, how would you have reacted to it and what steps would you have taken
up? Analyze it with your friends and teachers and paste your learnings on the notice board
of your classroom.
Yet another Example……. Landslide affecting the villages
Who is to be held responsible for it? Is it the
school administration, teachers or the children?
Dear Friends,
Join me today…
Karnataka’s Fire Department runs a
programme called SAFE (Students
Association of Fire Education) impart-
ing fire safety training to students.
www.karnatakafireservices.gov.in
4
If you are residing in any of these areas, then look out for its safety. Know
the type of soil and if vulnerable move to a safer place.
Develop an evacuation plan for your locality in case you are prone to landslides.
From the above case study we need to realize the need for alternative communication
for carrying out search and rescue operations and also establish linkage with
various government and non-governmental agencies. Chapter 4 of the book
discusses about various alternative communication systems that exist in
the world of science and technology today. As this chapter is based
In the later half of August 1998, severe rains lashed the Himalayas, causing devastation in their wake.
On August 14, 69 people died in a landslide in Okhimath block (near Gutptkashi). A week later, the
entire village of Malpa, lying along the Kali River on the way from Dharchula to Lipu
Lekh, was swept away
Isn’t one-week time enough for the people of Malpa to evacuate? Probably there was no proper
communication given by authorities to villagers.
The death toll, 205, included road workers, porters, members of the border police, and five dozen
pilgrims returning from a yatra (pilgrimage) to Mount Kailash and Lake Mansarovar in Tibet (August
18). Two dozen more people died when Mansuna village in Rudraprayag district also disappeared
(August 19). In addition, the torrential rains demolished hundreds of homes and infrastructure and
intense winds also hampered rescue efforts.
Isn’t site selection important for carrying out constructions?
By August 20, the authorities began evacuating 50,000
residents of the Okhimath block, as rubble, debris, and
boulders had fallen into the Madmaheshwar River, a
tributary of the Mandakini, plugging it and causing the
formation of an artificial lake. Many houses that were
located in these vulnerable sites were washed away. As
the lake swelled, so did the danger, as a flash flood
would submerge two - dozen villages. The army cautioned
against blasting the artificial dam with dynamite, as the
sudden discharge would overwhelm the villages below.
Instead, the villagers suggested that the lake should be
left to erode naturally. Also, local villagers and social activists went on search and rescue expeditions,
while various NGOs scrambled to attend to the needy.
Don’t you think help from various agencies and community has helped in rapid search and rescue
operations?
In Dehradun and other large cities, generous people rallied to send aid to the victims of the landslides
and flooding that had afflicted the plains.
What do you think were the steps that were to be necessarily taken by the people and the administration?
Early warning to the villagers and the pilgrims regarding the weather, specialized training to the
villagers on search and rescue and first aid, construction of retaining walls on the hilly terrains would
have saved many precious lives.
5
on science do take help from your Science teachers. Hope you all will enjoy reading it and relate it
to your favorite subject of ‘Physics’.
This case study that you have just read points out how important it is for us to have an understanding
of good constructional practices so that you are safe in your schools and at home. To have a better
and also a skilled personnel and save lives of your near and
dear country men/women in any disaster scenario.
To have a safer living and a safer tomorrow it is time for us
to plan ahead for our community/locality that we live in. Being
a part of the community you should now take up the
responsibility of preparing the community/locality that you live
in, based on the hazard that you are prone to.
Chapter 7 of the book discusses the components and the
process of preparing the disaster management plan for your
area. The case study below shows how proper planning at
the community level has saved people of Bangladesh from
the devastating cyclones.
Safe traditional house which has survived the
major landslide
Community planning in progress
understanding of safe construction practices
Chapter 5 of the book discusses about various
safe construction practices that needs to be adhered
to by people residing in vulnerable pockets like
earthquake, landslide, flood and cyclone prone
regions of the country.
It is time to take help and support from the
government and various agencies like the NCC,
NSS, Home Guards etc and get ourselves prepared.
Chapter 6 discusses the roles that government and
various agencies play in managing disasters. You
too as an active and responsible citizen of the
country can play a major role. You can be a volunteer
Following the 1970 cyclone, which killed 50,000 people, the Government of
Bangladesh began working to improve the coastal warnings and evacuation. The
main objective was to issue warnings, building and operating shelters assisting
evacuation, search and rescue, first aid, relief and rehabilitation and building
up community preparedness capacity.
A cadre of 32,000 village volunteers, men and women were, organized into local
teams of 12. They were equipped with radios to monitor weather bulletins,
megaphones and hand operated sirens, first aid kits, rescue equipments and
protective clothing. These volunteers were trained at regular interval. Specialist
training such as radio use, first aid and leadership was provided separately.
The volunteers organized regular rehearsals and demonstrations in the villages
and mass awareness campaigns every year. However, this community preparedness
programme has been widely acknowledged and hundreds and thousands of
people can now routinely be evacuated from the path of cyclone. In May 1994,
three quarters of a million people were safely evacuated; only few people died.
Read More

Share with a friend

108 videos|314 docs|102 tests

Join the discussion

Related Searches

practice quizzes

,

pdf

,

past year papers

,

NCERT Textbook - Introduction Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

study material

,

ppt

,

NCERT Textbook - Introduction Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

Objective type Questions

,

Important questions

,

Free

,

mock tests for examination

,

Extra Questions

,

Exam

,

MCQs

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

video lectures

,

Semester Notes

,

Summary

,

Sample Paper

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

NCERT Textbook - Introduction Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

Viva Questions

;