NCERT Textbook - Should Wizard Hit Mommy Class 12 Notes | EduRev

English Class 12

Class 12 : NCERT Textbook - Should Wizard Hit Mommy Class 12 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


48 Vistas
5 5 5 5 5
Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike
Before you read
Here is a story about the worldview of a little child, and
the difficult moral question she raises during the story session
with her father.
In the evenings and for Saturday naps
like today’s, Jack told his daughter Jo a
story out of his head. This custom,
begun when she was two, was itself now
nearly two years old, and his head felt
empty. Each new story was a slight
variation of a basic tale: a small
creature, usually named Roger (Roger
Fish, Roger Squirrel, Roger Chipmunk),
had some problem and went with it to
the wise old owl. The owl told him to go
to the wizard, and the wizard performed a magic spell that
solved the problem, demanding in payment a number of
pennies greater than the number that Roger Creature had,
but in the same breath directing the animal to a place
where the extra pennies could be found. Then Roger was
so happy he played many games with other creatures, and
went home to his mother just in time to hear the train
whistle that brought his daddy home from Boston. Jack
Who is Jo? How
does she respond
to her father’s
story-telling?
2019-20
Page 2


48 Vistas
5 5 5 5 5
Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike
Before you read
Here is a story about the worldview of a little child, and
the difficult moral question she raises during the story session
with her father.
In the evenings and for Saturday naps
like today’s, Jack told his daughter Jo a
story out of his head. This custom,
begun when she was two, was itself now
nearly two years old, and his head felt
empty. Each new story was a slight
variation of a basic tale: a small
creature, usually named Roger (Roger
Fish, Roger Squirrel, Roger Chipmunk),
had some problem and went with it to
the wise old owl. The owl told him to go
to the wizard, and the wizard performed a magic spell that
solved the problem, demanding in payment a number of
pennies greater than the number that Roger Creature had,
but in the same breath directing the animal to a place
where the extra pennies could be found. Then Roger was
so happy he played many games with other creatures, and
went home to his mother just in time to hear the train
whistle that brought his daddy home from Boston. Jack
Who is Jo? How
does she respond
to her father’s
story-telling?
2019-20
49 Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
described their supper, and the story was over. Working
his way through this scheme was especially fatiguing on
Saturday, because Jo never fell asleep in naps any more,
and knowing this made the rite seem futile.
The little girl (not so little any more; the bumps her
feet made under the covers were halfway down the bed,
their big double bed that they let her be in for naps and
when she was sick) had at last arranged herself, and from
the way her fat face deep in the pillow shone in the sunlight
sifting through the drawn shades, it did not seem fantastic
that some magic would occur, and she would take her nap
like an infant of two. Her brother, Bobby, was two, and
already asleep with his bottle. Jack asked, “Who shall the
story be about today?”
“Roger...” Jo squeezed her eyes shut and smiled to be
thinking she was thinking. Her eyes opened, her mother’s
blue. “Skunk,” she said firmly.
A new animal; they must talk about skunks at nursery
school. Having a fresh hero momentarily stirred Jack to
creative enthusiasm. “All right,” he said. “Once upon a time,
in the deep dark woods, there was a tiny little creature by
the name of Roger Skunk. And he smelled very bad.”
“Yes,” Jo said.
“He smelled so bad that none of the other little
woodland creatures would play with him.” Jo looked at
him solemnly; she hadn’t foreseen this. “Whenever he
would go out to play,” Jack continued with zest,
remembering certain humiliations of his own childhood,
“all of the other tiny animals would cry, “Uh-oh, here comes
Roger Stinky Skunk,” and they would run away, and Roger
Skunk would stand there all alone, and two little round
tears would fall from his eyes.” The corners of Jo’s mouth
drooped down and her lower lip bent forward as he traced
with a forefinger along the side of her nose the course of
one of Roger Skunk’s tears.
“Won’t he see the owl?” she asked in a high and faintly
roughened voice.
Sitting on the bed beside her, Jack felt the covers tug
as her legs switched tensely. He was pleased with this
2019-20
Page 3


48 Vistas
5 5 5 5 5
Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike
Before you read
Here is a story about the worldview of a little child, and
the difficult moral question she raises during the story session
with her father.
In the evenings and for Saturday naps
like today’s, Jack told his daughter Jo a
story out of his head. This custom,
begun when she was two, was itself now
nearly two years old, and his head felt
empty. Each new story was a slight
variation of a basic tale: a small
creature, usually named Roger (Roger
Fish, Roger Squirrel, Roger Chipmunk),
had some problem and went with it to
the wise old owl. The owl told him to go
to the wizard, and the wizard performed a magic spell that
solved the problem, demanding in payment a number of
pennies greater than the number that Roger Creature had,
but in the same breath directing the animal to a place
where the extra pennies could be found. Then Roger was
so happy he played many games with other creatures, and
went home to his mother just in time to hear the train
whistle that brought his daddy home from Boston. Jack
Who is Jo? How
does she respond
to her father’s
story-telling?
2019-20
49 Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
described their supper, and the story was over. Working
his way through this scheme was especially fatiguing on
Saturday, because Jo never fell asleep in naps any more,
and knowing this made the rite seem futile.
The little girl (not so little any more; the bumps her
feet made under the covers were halfway down the bed,
their big double bed that they let her be in for naps and
when she was sick) had at last arranged herself, and from
the way her fat face deep in the pillow shone in the sunlight
sifting through the drawn shades, it did not seem fantastic
that some magic would occur, and she would take her nap
like an infant of two. Her brother, Bobby, was two, and
already asleep with his bottle. Jack asked, “Who shall the
story be about today?”
“Roger...” Jo squeezed her eyes shut and smiled to be
thinking she was thinking. Her eyes opened, her mother’s
blue. “Skunk,” she said firmly.
A new animal; they must talk about skunks at nursery
school. Having a fresh hero momentarily stirred Jack to
creative enthusiasm. “All right,” he said. “Once upon a time,
in the deep dark woods, there was a tiny little creature by
the name of Roger Skunk. And he smelled very bad.”
“Yes,” Jo said.
“He smelled so bad that none of the other little
woodland creatures would play with him.” Jo looked at
him solemnly; she hadn’t foreseen this. “Whenever he
would go out to play,” Jack continued with zest,
remembering certain humiliations of his own childhood,
“all of the other tiny animals would cry, “Uh-oh, here comes
Roger Stinky Skunk,” and they would run away, and Roger
Skunk would stand there all alone, and two little round
tears would fall from his eyes.” The corners of Jo’s mouth
drooped down and her lower lip bent forward as he traced
with a forefinger along the side of her nose the course of
one of Roger Skunk’s tears.
“Won’t he see the owl?” she asked in a high and faintly
roughened voice.
Sitting on the bed beside her, Jack felt the covers tug
as her legs switched tensely. He was pleased with this
2019-20
50 Vistas
moment — he was telling her something true, something
she must know — and had no wish to hurry on. But
downstairs a chair scraped, and he realised he must get
down to help Clare paint the living-room woodwork.
“Well, he walked along very sadly and came to a very
big tree, and in the tiptop of the tree was an enormous
wise old owl.”
“Good.”
“Mr Owl,” Roger Skunk said, “all the
other little animals run away from me
because I smell so bad.” “So you do,” the
owl said. “Very, very bad.” “What can I
do?” Roger Skunk said, and he cried
very hard.
“The wizard, the wizard,” Jo
shouted, and sat right up, and a Little
Golden Book spilled from the bed.
“Now, Jo. Daddy’s telling the story. Do you want to tell
Daddy the story?”
“No. You me.”
“Then lie down and be sleepy.”
Her head relapsed onto the pillow and she said, “Out
of your head.”
“Well. The owl thought and thought. At last he said,
“Why don’t you go see the wizard?”
“Daddy?”
“What?”
“Are magic spells real?” This was a new phase, just
this last month, a reality phase. When he told her spiders
eat bugs, she turned to her mother and asked, “Do they
really?” and when Clare told her God was in the sky and
all around them, she turned to her father and insisted,
with a sly yet eager smile, “Is He really?”
“They’re real in stories,” Jack answered curtly. She
had made him miss a beat in the narrative. “The owl said,
“Go through the dark woods, under the apple trees, into
the swamp, over the crick —”
“What’s a crick?”
2019-20
Page 4


48 Vistas
5 5 5 5 5
Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike
Before you read
Here is a story about the worldview of a little child, and
the difficult moral question she raises during the story session
with her father.
In the evenings and for Saturday naps
like today’s, Jack told his daughter Jo a
story out of his head. This custom,
begun when she was two, was itself now
nearly two years old, and his head felt
empty. Each new story was a slight
variation of a basic tale: a small
creature, usually named Roger (Roger
Fish, Roger Squirrel, Roger Chipmunk),
had some problem and went with it to
the wise old owl. The owl told him to go
to the wizard, and the wizard performed a magic spell that
solved the problem, demanding in payment a number of
pennies greater than the number that Roger Creature had,
but in the same breath directing the animal to a place
where the extra pennies could be found. Then Roger was
so happy he played many games with other creatures, and
went home to his mother just in time to hear the train
whistle that brought his daddy home from Boston. Jack
Who is Jo? How
does she respond
to her father’s
story-telling?
2019-20
49 Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
described their supper, and the story was over. Working
his way through this scheme was especially fatiguing on
Saturday, because Jo never fell asleep in naps any more,
and knowing this made the rite seem futile.
The little girl (not so little any more; the bumps her
feet made under the covers were halfway down the bed,
their big double bed that they let her be in for naps and
when she was sick) had at last arranged herself, and from
the way her fat face deep in the pillow shone in the sunlight
sifting through the drawn shades, it did not seem fantastic
that some magic would occur, and she would take her nap
like an infant of two. Her brother, Bobby, was two, and
already asleep with his bottle. Jack asked, “Who shall the
story be about today?”
“Roger...” Jo squeezed her eyes shut and smiled to be
thinking she was thinking. Her eyes opened, her mother’s
blue. “Skunk,” she said firmly.
A new animal; they must talk about skunks at nursery
school. Having a fresh hero momentarily stirred Jack to
creative enthusiasm. “All right,” he said. “Once upon a time,
in the deep dark woods, there was a tiny little creature by
the name of Roger Skunk. And he smelled very bad.”
“Yes,” Jo said.
“He smelled so bad that none of the other little
woodland creatures would play with him.” Jo looked at
him solemnly; she hadn’t foreseen this. “Whenever he
would go out to play,” Jack continued with zest,
remembering certain humiliations of his own childhood,
“all of the other tiny animals would cry, “Uh-oh, here comes
Roger Stinky Skunk,” and they would run away, and Roger
Skunk would stand there all alone, and two little round
tears would fall from his eyes.” The corners of Jo’s mouth
drooped down and her lower lip bent forward as he traced
with a forefinger along the side of her nose the course of
one of Roger Skunk’s tears.
“Won’t he see the owl?” she asked in a high and faintly
roughened voice.
Sitting on the bed beside her, Jack felt the covers tug
as her legs switched tensely. He was pleased with this
2019-20
50 Vistas
moment — he was telling her something true, something
she must know — and had no wish to hurry on. But
downstairs a chair scraped, and he realised he must get
down to help Clare paint the living-room woodwork.
“Well, he walked along very sadly and came to a very
big tree, and in the tiptop of the tree was an enormous
wise old owl.”
“Good.”
“Mr Owl,” Roger Skunk said, “all the
other little animals run away from me
because I smell so bad.” “So you do,” the
owl said. “Very, very bad.” “What can I
do?” Roger Skunk said, and he cried
very hard.
“The wizard, the wizard,” Jo
shouted, and sat right up, and a Little
Golden Book spilled from the bed.
“Now, Jo. Daddy’s telling the story. Do you want to tell
Daddy the story?”
“No. You me.”
“Then lie down and be sleepy.”
Her head relapsed onto the pillow and she said, “Out
of your head.”
“Well. The owl thought and thought. At last he said,
“Why don’t you go see the wizard?”
“Daddy?”
“What?”
“Are magic spells real?” This was a new phase, just
this last month, a reality phase. When he told her spiders
eat bugs, she turned to her mother and asked, “Do they
really?” and when Clare told her God was in the sky and
all around them, she turned to her father and insisted,
with a sly yet eager smile, “Is He really?”
“They’re real in stories,” Jack answered curtly. She
had made him miss a beat in the narrative. “The owl said,
“Go through the dark woods, under the apple trees, into
the swamp, over the crick —”
“What’s a crick?”
2019-20
51 Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
A little river. “Over the crick, and there will be the
wizard’s house.” And that’s the way Roger Skunk went,
and pretty soon he came to a little white house, and he
rapped on the door.” Jack rapped on the window sill, and
under the covers Jo’s tall figure clenched in an infantile
thrill. “And then a tiny little old man came out, with a long
white beard and a pointed blue hat, and said, “Eh?
Whatzis? Whatcher want? You smell awful.” The wizard’s
voice was one of Jack’s own favourite effects; he did it by
scrunching up his face and somehow whining through his
eyes, which felt for the interval rheumy. He felt being an
old man suited him.
“I know it,” Roger Skunk said, “and all the little animals
run away from me. The enormous wise owl said you could
help me.”
“Eh? Well, maybe. Come on in. Don’t get
too close.” Now, inside, Jo, there were all
these magic things, all jumbled together
in a big dusty heap, because the wizard
did not have any cleaning lady.”
“Why?”
“Why? Because he was a wizard,
and a very old man.”
“Will he die?”
“No. Wizards don’t die. Well, he
rummaged around and found an old
stick called a magic wand and asked
Roger Skunk what he wanted to smell
like. Roger thought and thought and
said, “Roses.”
“Yes. Good,” Jo said smugly.
Jack fixed her with a trance like gaze and chanted in
the wizard’s elderly irritable voice:
“Abracadabry, hocus-poo,
Roger Skunk, how do you do,
Roses, boses, pull an ear,
Roger Skunk, you never fear:
Bingo!”
2019-20
Page 5


48 Vistas
5 5 5 5 5
Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike John Updike
Before you read
Here is a story about the worldview of a little child, and
the difficult moral question she raises during the story session
with her father.
In the evenings and for Saturday naps
like today’s, Jack told his daughter Jo a
story out of his head. This custom,
begun when she was two, was itself now
nearly two years old, and his head felt
empty. Each new story was a slight
variation of a basic tale: a small
creature, usually named Roger (Roger
Fish, Roger Squirrel, Roger Chipmunk),
had some problem and went with it to
the wise old owl. The owl told him to go
to the wizard, and the wizard performed a magic spell that
solved the problem, demanding in payment a number of
pennies greater than the number that Roger Creature had,
but in the same breath directing the animal to a place
where the extra pennies could be found. Then Roger was
so happy he played many games with other creatures, and
went home to his mother just in time to hear the train
whistle that brought his daddy home from Boston. Jack
Who is Jo? How
does she respond
to her father’s
story-telling?
2019-20
49 Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
described their supper, and the story was over. Working
his way through this scheme was especially fatiguing on
Saturday, because Jo never fell asleep in naps any more,
and knowing this made the rite seem futile.
The little girl (not so little any more; the bumps her
feet made under the covers were halfway down the bed,
their big double bed that they let her be in for naps and
when she was sick) had at last arranged herself, and from
the way her fat face deep in the pillow shone in the sunlight
sifting through the drawn shades, it did not seem fantastic
that some magic would occur, and she would take her nap
like an infant of two. Her brother, Bobby, was two, and
already asleep with his bottle. Jack asked, “Who shall the
story be about today?”
“Roger...” Jo squeezed her eyes shut and smiled to be
thinking she was thinking. Her eyes opened, her mother’s
blue. “Skunk,” she said firmly.
A new animal; they must talk about skunks at nursery
school. Having a fresh hero momentarily stirred Jack to
creative enthusiasm. “All right,” he said. “Once upon a time,
in the deep dark woods, there was a tiny little creature by
the name of Roger Skunk. And he smelled very bad.”
“Yes,” Jo said.
“He smelled so bad that none of the other little
woodland creatures would play with him.” Jo looked at
him solemnly; she hadn’t foreseen this. “Whenever he
would go out to play,” Jack continued with zest,
remembering certain humiliations of his own childhood,
“all of the other tiny animals would cry, “Uh-oh, here comes
Roger Stinky Skunk,” and they would run away, and Roger
Skunk would stand there all alone, and two little round
tears would fall from his eyes.” The corners of Jo’s mouth
drooped down and her lower lip bent forward as he traced
with a forefinger along the side of her nose the course of
one of Roger Skunk’s tears.
“Won’t he see the owl?” she asked in a high and faintly
roughened voice.
Sitting on the bed beside her, Jack felt the covers tug
as her legs switched tensely. He was pleased with this
2019-20
50 Vistas
moment — he was telling her something true, something
she must know — and had no wish to hurry on. But
downstairs a chair scraped, and he realised he must get
down to help Clare paint the living-room woodwork.
“Well, he walked along very sadly and came to a very
big tree, and in the tiptop of the tree was an enormous
wise old owl.”
“Good.”
“Mr Owl,” Roger Skunk said, “all the
other little animals run away from me
because I smell so bad.” “So you do,” the
owl said. “Very, very bad.” “What can I
do?” Roger Skunk said, and he cried
very hard.
“The wizard, the wizard,” Jo
shouted, and sat right up, and a Little
Golden Book spilled from the bed.
“Now, Jo. Daddy’s telling the story. Do you want to tell
Daddy the story?”
“No. You me.”
“Then lie down and be sleepy.”
Her head relapsed onto the pillow and she said, “Out
of your head.”
“Well. The owl thought and thought. At last he said,
“Why don’t you go see the wizard?”
“Daddy?”
“What?”
“Are magic spells real?” This was a new phase, just
this last month, a reality phase. When he told her spiders
eat bugs, she turned to her mother and asked, “Do they
really?” and when Clare told her God was in the sky and
all around them, she turned to her father and insisted,
with a sly yet eager smile, “Is He really?”
“They’re real in stories,” Jack answered curtly. She
had made him miss a beat in the narrative. “The owl said,
“Go through the dark woods, under the apple trees, into
the swamp, over the crick —”
“What’s a crick?”
2019-20
51 Should Wizard Hit Mommy?
A little river. “Over the crick, and there will be the
wizard’s house.” And that’s the way Roger Skunk went,
and pretty soon he came to a little white house, and he
rapped on the door.” Jack rapped on the window sill, and
under the covers Jo’s tall figure clenched in an infantile
thrill. “And then a tiny little old man came out, with a long
white beard and a pointed blue hat, and said, “Eh?
Whatzis? Whatcher want? You smell awful.” The wizard’s
voice was one of Jack’s own favourite effects; he did it by
scrunching up his face and somehow whining through his
eyes, which felt for the interval rheumy. He felt being an
old man suited him.
“I know it,” Roger Skunk said, “and all the little animals
run away from me. The enormous wise owl said you could
help me.”
“Eh? Well, maybe. Come on in. Don’t get
too close.” Now, inside, Jo, there were all
these magic things, all jumbled together
in a big dusty heap, because the wizard
did not have any cleaning lady.”
“Why?”
“Why? Because he was a wizard,
and a very old man.”
“Will he die?”
“No. Wizards don’t die. Well, he
rummaged around and found an old
stick called a magic wand and asked
Roger Skunk what he wanted to smell
like. Roger thought and thought and
said, “Roses.”
“Yes. Good,” Jo said smugly.
Jack fixed her with a trance like gaze and chanted in
the wizard’s elderly irritable voice:
“Abracadabry, hocus-poo,
Roger Skunk, how do you do,
Roses, boses, pull an ear,
Roger Skunk, you never fear:
Bingo!”
2019-20
52 Vistas
He paused as a rapt expression widened out from his
daughter’s nostrils, forcing her eyebrows up and her lower
lip down in a wide noiseless grin, an expression in which
Jack was startled to recognise his wife feigning pleasure
at cocktail parties. “And all of a sudden,” he whispered,
“the whole inside of the wizard’s house was full of the
smell of — roses! ‘Roses!’ Roger Fish cried. And the wizard
said, very cranky, “That’ll be seven pennies.”
“Daddy.”
“What?”
“Roger Skunk. You said Roger Fish.”
“Yes. Skunk.”
“You said Roger Fish. Wasn’t that silly?”
“Very silly of your stupid old daddy. Where was I? Well,
you know about the pennies.”
“Say it.”
“O.K. Roger Skunk said, ‘But all I have is four pennies,’
and he began to cry.” Jo made the crying face again, but
this time without a trace of sincerity. This annoyed Jack.
Downstairs some more furniture rumbled. Clare shouldn’t
move heavy things; she was six months pregnant. It would
be their third.
“So the wizard said, ‘Oh, very well. Go to the end of
the lane and turn around three times and look down the
magic well and there you will find three pennies. Hurry
up.’ So Roger Skunk went to the end of the lane and turned
around three times and there in the magic well were three
pennies! So he took them back to the wizard and was very
happy and ran out into the woods and all the other little
animals gathered around him because he smelled so good.
And they played tag, baseball, football, basketball, lacrosse,
hockey, soccer, and pick-up-sticks.”
“What’s pick-up-sticks?”
“It’s a game you play with sticks.”
“Like the wizard’s magic wand?”
“Kind of. And they played games and laughed all
afternoon and then it began to get dark and they all ran
home to their mommies.”
2019-20
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Related Searches

ppt

,

Extra Questions

,

study material

,

past year papers

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Exam

,

Summary

,

MCQs

,

NCERT Textbook - Should Wizard Hit Mommy Class 12 Notes | EduRev

,

Viva Questions

,

Free

,

Sample Paper

,

mock tests for examination

,

Semester Notes

,

practice quizzes

,

Important questions

,

Objective type Questions

,

NCERT Textbook - Should Wizard Hit Mommy Class 12 Notes | EduRev

,

pdf

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

video lectures

,

NCERT Textbook - Should Wizard Hit Mommy Class 12 Notes | EduRev

;