Noun & its Classifications (Part -2) - English Grammar Teaching Notes | EduRev

English Grammar

Teaching : Noun & its Classifications (Part -2) - English Grammar Teaching Notes | EduRev

The document Noun & its Classifications (Part -2) - English Grammar Teaching Notes | EduRev is a part of the Teaching Course English Grammar.
All you need of Teaching at this link: Teaching

Noun : Case

There are four kinds of case :
1. Nominative
2. Accusative
3. Possessive
4. Dative

If noun or pronoun is used as the subject, it is called nominative use.
As,

She is reading.
       ↓
Nominative
Mohan is walking
      ↓
Nominative

If noun or pronoun is used as the object, called accusative use.

As,
I like her.
       ↓
Accusative
That is Anjali.
     ↓
Accusative
If the possession or the relation of noun is said, it is called possessive case.

As,
Rahul's book.
     ↓
possession
Sharukh's brother.
     ↓
relation

If noun or pronoun is called or addressed, it is called dative case.

As,
John, read mindly.
   ↓
Dative

Come here, Seema.
   ↓
Dative

But, before reading noun and case, we should study the case of pronoun.

Nominative Accusative Possessive
We us our/ours
I me my/mine
He him his
She her her/hers
You you your/yours
They them their/theirs
Who whom whose

 

1. After let pronouns are used in accusative case.
As,
Let we read mindly. —wrong
Let us read mindly. —correct
Let them, her and we go there. —wrong
Let them, her and us go there. —correct

2. After preposition pronoun is used in accusative case.
As,
There is a nice relation between she and I. —wrong
There is a nice relation between her and me. —correct

3. After than, pronoun should be used in nominative case.

As,
Ram is better than her. —wrong
Ram is better than she. —correct
But, Ram runs faster than she/her —correct
[As helping verb is not used in comparative degree]

4. After if pronoun is used in nominative case.
As,
If I were him I would have gone. —wrong
If I were he I would have gone. —correct

Use of the Possessive Case

1. To the end of a singular noun we put —'s for possessive case :
As,
Rajiv's book, Meena's mother, President's bodyguard.

2. —s ending plural nouns take only (’) 
As,
Boys' hostel, Girls' school
But,
Women's college, Men's competition, Children's park

3. In compound nouns, we use possessive with the last term.
As,
Commander-in-chief's order
Mother-in-law's house
Father-in-law's problem
Engineer-in-chiefs' office
Brother-in-law's wife.

4. If possessive is used before than, it should be used after than.
As,
Ravi's sister is more beautiful than Karan. —wrong
Ravi's sister is more beautiful than Karan's. —correct.
Kareena's husband is more handsome than Karishma.  — wrong
Kareena's husband is more handsome than Karishma's.  — correct
Rohan's brother is more intelligent than Mohan. —wrong
Rohan's brother is more intelligent than Mohan's. —correct

Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Dynamic Test

Content Category

Related Searches

Summary

,

past year papers

,

mock tests for examination

,

practice quizzes

,

Semester Notes

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Noun & its Classifications (Part -2) - English Grammar Teaching Notes | EduRev

,

Noun & its Classifications (Part -2) - English Grammar Teaching Notes | EduRev

,

Important questions

,

study material

,

Extra Questions

,

Objective type Questions

,

ppt

,

MCQs

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Exam

,

Noun & its Classifications (Part -2) - English Grammar Teaching Notes | EduRev

,

Free

,

Sample Paper

,

Viva Questions

,

pdf

,

video lectures

;