Performance of Contract (Part-4) - The Indian Contract Act 1872 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

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CA CPT : Performance of Contract (Part-4) - The Indian Contract Act 1872 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

The document Performance of Contract (Part-4) - The Indian Contract Act 1872 CA CPT Notes | EduRev is a part of the CA CPT Course Business Laws for CA Foundation.
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APPROPRIATION OF PAYMENTS:

Sometimes, a debtor owes several debts to the same creditor and makes payment, which is not sufficient to discharge all the debts. In such cases, the payment is appropriated (i.e. adjusted against the debts) as per Section 59 to 61 of the Indian Contract Act.
(i) Application  of payment where debt to be discharged is indicated (Section 59): Where a debtor, owing several distinct debts to one person, makes a payment to him either with express intimation or under circumstances implying that the payment is to be applied to the discharge of some particular debt, the payment, if accepted, must be applied accordingly.

(ii) Application of payment where debt to be discharged is not indicated (Section 60): Where the debtor has omitted to intimate and there are no other circumstances indicating to which debt the payment is to be applied the creditor may apply it at his discretion to any lawful debt actually due and payable to him from the debtor, where its recovery is or is not barred by the law in force for the time being as to the limitation of suits.
(iii) Application of payment where neither party appropriates (Section 61): Where neither party makes any appropriation, the payment shall be applied in discharge of the debts in order of time, whether they are or are not barred by the law in force for the time being as to the limitation of suits. If the debts are of equal standing, the payments shall be applied in discharge of each proportionately.

CONTRACTS, WHICH NEED NOT BE PERFORMED - WITH THE CONSENT OF BOTH THE PARTIES:

Under this heading, we shall discuss the principles of Novation, Rescission and Alteration. The law is contained in Sections 62 to 67 of the Contract Act.

(i) Effect of novation, rescission, and alteration of contract (Section 62): “If the parties to a contract agree to substitute a new contract for it, or to rescind or alter it, the original contract need not be performed”.
Analysis of Section 62
(a) Effect of novation: The parties to a contract may substitute a new contract for the old. If they do so, it will be a case of novation. On novation, the old contract is discharged and consequently it need not be performed. Thus, it is a case where there being a contract in existence some new contract is substituted for it either between the same parties or between different parties the consideration mutually being the discharge of old contract. Novation can take place only by mutual agreement between the parties.

Example: A owes B Rs. 100,000. A, B and C agree that C will pay B and he will accept Rs. 100,000 from C in lieu of the sum due from A. A’s liability thereby shall come to an end, and the old contract between A and B will be substituted by the new contract between B and C.
(b) Effect of rescission: A contract is also discharged by rescission. When the parties to a contract agree to rescind it, the contract need not be performed. In the case of rescission, only the old contract is cancelled and no new contract comes to exist in its place. It is needless to point out that novation also involves rescission. Both in novation and in rescission, the contract is discharged by mutual agreement.
(c) Effect of alteration of contract: As in the case of novation and rescission, so also in a case where the parties to a contract agree to alter it, the original contract is rescinded, with the result that it need not be performed. In other words, a contract is also discharged by alteration. The terms of contract may be so altered by mutual agreement that the alteration may have the effect of substituting a new contract for the old one. In other words, the distinction between novation and alteration is very slender.

Novation and alteration: The law pertaining to novation and alteration is contained in Sections 62 to 67 of the Indian Contract Act. In both these cases the original contract need not be performed. Still there is a difference between these two.
1. Novation means substitution of an existing contract with a new one. Novation may be made by changing in the terms of the contract or there may be a change in the contracting parties. But in case of alteration the terms of the contract may be altered by mutual agreement by the contracting parties but the parties to the contract will remain the same.
2. In case of novation there is altogether a substitution of new contract in place of the old contract. But in case of alteration it is not essential to substitute a new contract in place of the old contract. In alteration, there may be a change in some of the terms and conditions of the original agreement.
(ii) Promisee may waive or remit performance of promise Section 63 - “Every promisee may dispense with or remit, wholly or in part, the performance of the promise made to him, or may extend the time for such performance or may accept instead of it any satisfaction which he thinks fit”. In other words, a contract may be discharged by remission.
Example: A owes B Rs. 5,00,000. A pays to B, and B accepts, in satisfaction of the whole debt, Rs. 2,00,000 paid at the time and place at which the Rs. 5,00,000 were payable. The whole debt is discharged.
(iii) Restoration of Benefit under a Voidable Contract (Section 64) - The law on the subject is “When a person at whose option a contract is voidable rescinds it, the other party thereto need not perform any promise therein contained in which he is the promisor. The party rescinding avoidable contract shall, if he has received any benefit thereunder from another party to such contract, restore such benefit, so far as may be, to the person from whom it was received”.

Analysis of Section 64
Such a contract can be terminated at the option of the party who is empowered to do so. If he has received any benefit under the contract, he must restore such benefit to the person from whom he has received it.

Example: An insurance company may rescind a policy on the ground that material fact has not been disclosed. When it does so, the premium collected by it in respect of the policy reduced by the amount of expenses incurred by it in this connection must be repaid to the policy holder.
(iv) Obligations of Person who has Received Advantage under Void
Agreement or contract that becomes void (Section 65)

“When an agreement is discovered to be void or when a contract becomes void, any person who has received any advantage under such agreement or contract is bound to restore it, or to make compensation for it to the person from whom he received it.”
Analysis of Section 65
From the language of the Section, it is clear that in such a case either the advantage received must be restored back or a compensation, sucient to put the position prior to contract, should be paid.

Example: A pays B Rs. 1,00,000, in consideration of B’s promising to marry C, A’s daughter. C is dead at the time of the promise. The agreement is void, but B must repay A Rs. 1,00,000.

In a case, the plaintiff hired a godown from the defendant for twelve months and paid the whole of the rent in advance. After about seven months the godown was destroyed by fire, without any fault or negligence on the part of the plaintiff and the plaintiff claimed a refund of a proportionate amount of the rent. Held, the plaintiff was entitled to recover the rent for the unexpired term, of the contract.

The Act requires that a party must give back whatever he has received under the contract.  The benefit to be restored under this section must be benefit received under the contract (and not any other amount). A agrees to sell land to B for Rs. 400,000. B pays to A Rs. 40,000 as a deposit at the time of the contract, the amount to be forfeited by A if B does not complete the sale within a specified period. B fails to complete the sale within the specified period, nor is he ready and willing to complete the sale within a reasonable time after the expiry of that period. A is entitled to rescind the contract and to retain the deposit. The deposit is not a benefit received under the contract, it is a security that the purchaser would fulfill his contract and is ancillary to the contract for the sale of the land. (v) Communication of rescission (Section 66): You have noticed that a contract voidable at the option of one of the parties can be rescinded; but rescission must be communicated to the other party in the same manner as a proposal is communicated under Section 4 of the Contract Act. Similarly, a rescission may be revoked in the same manner as a proposal is revoked.
(vi) Effects of neglect of promisee to afford promisor reasonable facilities for performance (Section 67): If any promisee neglects or refuses to afford the promisor reasonable facilities for the performance of his promise, the promisor is excused by such neglect or refusal as to any non performance caused thereby.

Example: If an apprentice refuses to learn, the teacher cannot be held liable for not teaching.

Example: A contracts with B to repair B’s house. B neglects or refuses to appoint out to A the places in which his house requires repair. A is excused for the non-performance of the contract, if it is caused by such neglect or refusal.

DISCHARGE OF A CONTRACT:

A contract is discharged when the obligations created by it come to an end. A contract may be discharged in any one of the following ways:
(i) Discharge by performance: It takes place when the parties to the contract fulfil their obligations arising under the contract within the time and in the manner prescribed. Discharge by performance may be
(1) Actual performance; or
(2) Attempted performance.

Actual performance is said to have taken place, when each of the parties has done what he had agreed to do under the agreement. When the promisor offers to perform his obligation, but the promisee refuses to accept the performance, it amounts to attempted performance or tender.

Example: A contracts to sell his car to B on the agreed price. As soon as the car is delivered to B and B pays the agreed price for it, the contract comes to an end by performance.
(ii) Discharge by mutual agreement: Section 62 of the Indian Contract Act provides if the parties to a contract agree to substitute a new contract for it, or to rescind or remit or alter it, the original contract need not be performed. The principles of Novation, Rescission, Alteration and Remission are already discussed.

Example: A owes B Rs. 1,00,000. A enters into an agreement with B and mortgage his (A’s), estates for Rs. 50,000 in place of the debt of Rs. 1,00,000. This is a new contract and extinguishes the old.

Example: A owes B Rs. 5,00,000. A pays to B  Rs. 3,00,000 who accepts it in full satisfaction of the debt. The whole is discharged.
(iii) Discharge by impossibility of performance: The impossibility may exist from the very start. In that case, it would be impossibility ab initio. Alternatively, it may supervene. Supervening impossibility may take place owing to:

(a) an unforeseen change in law;
(b) the destruction of the subject-matter essential to that performance;
(c) the non-existence or non-occurrence of particular state of things, which was naturally contemplated for performing the contract, as a result of some personal incapacity like dangerous malady;
(d)  the declaration of a war (Section 56).

Example 1: A agrees with B to discover a treasure by magic. The agreement is void due to initial impossibility.

Example 2: A and B contract to marry each other. Before the time fixed for the marriage, A goes mad. The contract becomes void.

Example 3: A contracts to act at a theatre for six months in consideration of a sum paid in advance by B. On several occasions A is too ill to act. The contract to act on those occasions becomes void.
(iv) Discharge by lapse of time: A contract should be performed within a specified period as prescribed by the Limitation Act, 1963. If it is not performed and if no action is taken by the promisee within the specified period of limitation, he is deprived of remedy at law.

Example: If a creditor does not file a suit against the buyer for recovery of the price within three years, the debt becomes time-barred and hence irrecoverable.
(v) Discharge by operation of law: A contract may be discharged by operation of law which includes by death of the promisor, by insolvency etc.
(vi) Discharge by breach of contract: Breach of contract may be actual breach of contract or anticipatory breach of contract. If one party defaults in performing his part of the contract on the due date, he is said to have committed breach thereof. When on the other hand, a person repudiates a contract before the stipulated time for its performance has arrived, he is deemed to have committed anticipatory breach. If one of the parties to a contract breaks the promise the party injured thereby, has not only a right of action for damages but he is also discharged from performing his part of the contract.
(vii) Promisee may waive or remit performance of promise: Every promisee may dispense with or remit, wholly or in part, the performance of the promise made to him, or may extend the time for such performance or may accept instead of it any satisfaction which he thinks ffit. In other words, a contract may be discharged by remission. (Section 63)
Example: A owes B Rs. 5,00,000. C pays to B Rs. 1,00,000 and B accepts them, in satisfaction of his claim on A. This payment is a discharge of the whole claim.
(viii)Effects of neglect of promisee to afford promisor reasonable facilities for performance: If any promisee neglects or refuses to afford the promisor reasonable facilities for the performance of his promise, the promisor is excused by such neglect or refusal as to any non-performance caused thereby. (Section 67)
(ix)  Merger of rights: Sometimes, the inferior rights and the superior rights coincide and meet in one and the same person. In such cases, the inferior rights merge into the superior rights. On merger, the inferior rights vanish and are not required to be enforced.
Example: A took a land on lease from B. Subsequently, A purchases that very land. Now, A becomes the owner of the land and the ownership rights being superior to rights of a lessee, the earlier contract of lease stands terminated.

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