Professional Etiquette - PowerPoint Presentation, Communication

: Professional Etiquette - PowerPoint Presentation, Communication

Created by: Simran Kaur
 Page 1


Professional Etiquette 
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Professional Etiquette 
Going Through Doors 
• You hold the door open for a woman if you would hold it 
open for a man in the same situation. 
• Doors are held open for superiors, for clients, for peers 
following close on your heels and for anyone who is 
loaded down with packages, regardless of your gender or 
theirs. 
• Whoever is closest to the elevator doors, man or woman, 
exits first.  Men do not jam up elevators by trying to let the 
woman out first, unless of course she happens to be your 
CEO or your client.  
Page 3


Professional Etiquette 
Going Through Doors 
• You hold the door open for a woman if you would hold it 
open for a man in the same situation. 
• Doors are held open for superiors, for clients, for peers 
following close on your heels and for anyone who is 
loaded down with packages, regardless of your gender or 
theirs. 
• Whoever is closest to the elevator doors, man or woman, 
exits first.  Men do not jam up elevators by trying to let the 
woman out first, unless of course she happens to be your 
CEO or your client.  
Introductions 
• The person of lesser importance, regardless 
of gender, is introduced to the person of 
greater importance, regardless of gender. 
• Example: "Mr. or Ms. Greater Authority, I'd 
like to introduce Mr. or Ms. Lesser 
Authority."  Remember the client is always 
the greater authority. 
Page 4


Professional Etiquette 
Going Through Doors 
• You hold the door open for a woman if you would hold it 
open for a man in the same situation. 
• Doors are held open for superiors, for clients, for peers 
following close on your heels and for anyone who is 
loaded down with packages, regardless of your gender or 
theirs. 
• Whoever is closest to the elevator doors, man or woman, 
exits first.  Men do not jam up elevators by trying to let the 
woman out first, unless of course she happens to be your 
CEO or your client.  
Introductions 
• The person of lesser importance, regardless 
of gender, is introduced to the person of 
greater importance, regardless of gender. 
• Example: "Mr. or Ms. Greater Authority, I'd 
like to introduce Mr. or Ms. Lesser 
Authority."  Remember the client is always 
the greater authority. 
Handshakes 
• It doesn't matter who extends the hand first, but 
the one who does takes control of the situation, 
takes matters in hand if you will. 
• The proper placement of the nametag is high on 
the right shoulder. When shaking hands, your eye 
follows the line of your arm to the other person's 
right side. By placing the tag on the right, it's easy 
to read the name while shaking hands. 
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Professional Etiquette 
Going Through Doors 
• You hold the door open for a woman if you would hold it 
open for a man in the same situation. 
• Doors are held open for superiors, for clients, for peers 
following close on your heels and for anyone who is 
loaded down with packages, regardless of your gender or 
theirs. 
• Whoever is closest to the elevator doors, man or woman, 
exits first.  Men do not jam up elevators by trying to let the 
woman out first, unless of course she happens to be your 
CEO or your client.  
Introductions 
• The person of lesser importance, regardless 
of gender, is introduced to the person of 
greater importance, regardless of gender. 
• Example: "Mr. or Ms. Greater Authority, I'd 
like to introduce Mr. or Ms. Lesser 
Authority."  Remember the client is always 
the greater authority. 
Handshakes 
• It doesn't matter who extends the hand first, but 
the one who does takes control of the situation, 
takes matters in hand if you will. 
• The proper placement of the nametag is high on 
the right shoulder. When shaking hands, your eye 
follows the line of your arm to the other person's 
right side. By placing the tag on the right, it's easy 
to read the name while shaking hands. 
Telephone Answering 
• In business, in addition to the greeting, it's 
necessary to identify ourselves and the company 
or department.  
    Example: "Good afternoon, Etiquette 
International, Hilka Klinkenberg speaking." or 
"Protocol Office. This is Hilka. How may I help 
you?"  
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