RC Questions GMAT(1995-2000) GMAT Notes | EduRev

GMAT : RC Questions GMAT(1995-2000) GMAT Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


 1
1995-2000 Reading Full Test 
 
1995-08 
Questions 1-9 
The ocean bottom ------a region nearly 2.5 times greater than the total land area of the 
Earth ---- is a vast frontier that even today is largely unexplored and uncharted. Until 
about a century ago, the deep-ocean floor was completely inaccessible, hidden beneath 
waters averaging over 3,600 meters deep. Totally without light and subjected to intense 
pressures hundreds of times greater than at the Earth's surface, the deep-ocean bottom 
is a hostile environment to humans, in some ways as forbidding and remote as the void 
of outer space. 
    Although researchers have taken samples of deep-ocean rocks and sediments for 
over a century, the first detailed global investigation of the ocean bottom did not 
actually start until 1968, with the beginning of the National Science Foundation's Deep 
Sea Drilling Project (DSDP).Using techniques first developed for the offshore oil and 
gas industry, the DSDP's drill ship, the Glomar Challenger, was able to maintain a 
steady position on the ocean's surface and drill in very deep waters, extracting samples 
of sediments and rock from the ocean floor. 
    The Glomar Challenger completed 96 voyages in a 15-year research program that 
ended in November 1983. During this time, the vessel logged 600,000 kilometers and 
took almost 20,000 core samples of seabed sediments and rocks at 624 drilling sites 
around the world. The Glomar Challenger's core samples have allowed geologists 
to reconstruct what the planet looked like hundred of millions of years ago and to 
calculate what it will probably look like millions of years in the future. Today, largely 
on the strength of evidence gathered during the Glomar Challenger's voyages, nearly 
all earth scientists agree on the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift that 
explain many of the geological processes that shape the Earth. 
   The cores of sediment drilled by the Glomar Challenger have also yielded 
information critical to understanding the world's past climates. Deep-ocean sediments 
provide a climatic record stretching back hundreds of millions of years, because they 
are largely isolated from the mechanical erosion and the intense chemical and biological 
activity that rapidly destroy much land-based evidence of past climates. This record has 
already provided insights into the patterns and causes of past climatic change --- 
information that may be used to predict future climates. 
 
1.The author refers to the ocean bottom as a "frontier" in line 2 because it 
(A)is not a popular area for scientific research 
(B)contains a wide variety of life forms 
(C)attracts courageous explorers 
(D)is an unknown territory 
2.The word "inaccessible" in line 3 is closest in meaning to 
(A)unrecognizable 
Page 2


 1
1995-2000 Reading Full Test 
 
1995-08 
Questions 1-9 
The ocean bottom ------a region nearly 2.5 times greater than the total land area of the 
Earth ---- is a vast frontier that even today is largely unexplored and uncharted. Until 
about a century ago, the deep-ocean floor was completely inaccessible, hidden beneath 
waters averaging over 3,600 meters deep. Totally without light and subjected to intense 
pressures hundreds of times greater than at the Earth's surface, the deep-ocean bottom 
is a hostile environment to humans, in some ways as forbidding and remote as the void 
of outer space. 
    Although researchers have taken samples of deep-ocean rocks and sediments for 
over a century, the first detailed global investigation of the ocean bottom did not 
actually start until 1968, with the beginning of the National Science Foundation's Deep 
Sea Drilling Project (DSDP).Using techniques first developed for the offshore oil and 
gas industry, the DSDP's drill ship, the Glomar Challenger, was able to maintain a 
steady position on the ocean's surface and drill in very deep waters, extracting samples 
of sediments and rock from the ocean floor. 
    The Glomar Challenger completed 96 voyages in a 15-year research program that 
ended in November 1983. During this time, the vessel logged 600,000 kilometers and 
took almost 20,000 core samples of seabed sediments and rocks at 624 drilling sites 
around the world. The Glomar Challenger's core samples have allowed geologists 
to reconstruct what the planet looked like hundred of millions of years ago and to 
calculate what it will probably look like millions of years in the future. Today, largely 
on the strength of evidence gathered during the Glomar Challenger's voyages, nearly 
all earth scientists agree on the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift that 
explain many of the geological processes that shape the Earth. 
   The cores of sediment drilled by the Glomar Challenger have also yielded 
information critical to understanding the world's past climates. Deep-ocean sediments 
provide a climatic record stretching back hundreds of millions of years, because they 
are largely isolated from the mechanical erosion and the intense chemical and biological 
activity that rapidly destroy much land-based evidence of past climates. This record has 
already provided insights into the patterns and causes of past climatic change --- 
information that may be used to predict future climates. 
 
1.The author refers to the ocean bottom as a "frontier" in line 2 because it 
(A)is not a popular area for scientific research 
(B)contains a wide variety of life forms 
(C)attracts courageous explorers 
(D)is an unknown territory 
2.The word "inaccessible" in line 3 is closest in meaning to 
(A)unrecognizable 
 
 2
(B)unreachable 
(C)unusable 
(D)unsafe 
3.The author mentions outer space in line 7 because 
(A)the Earth's climate millions of years ago was similar to conditions in outer space. 
(B)it is similar to the ocean floor in being alien to the human environment 
(C)rock formations in outer space are similar to those found on the ocean floor 
(D)techniques used by scientists to explore outer space were similar to those used in ocean 
exploration 
4. Which of the following is true of the Glomar Challenger? 
(A) It is a type of submarine. 
(B) It is an ongoing project. 
(C) It has gone on over 100 voyages 
(D) It made its first DSDP voyage in 1968 
5. The word " extracting " in line 13 is closest in meaning to 
(A) breaking 
(B) locating 
(C) removing 
(D) analyzing 
6. The deep Sea Drilling Project was significant because it was 
(A) an attempt to find new sources of oil and gas 
(B) the first extensive exploration of the ocean bottom 
(C) composed of geologists form all over the world 
(D) funded entirely by the gas and oil industry 
7. The word " strength " in line21 is closest in meaning to 
(A)basis 
(B)purpose 
(C)discovery 
(D)endurance 
8.The word " they " in line26 refers to 
(A)years 
(B)climates 
(C)sediments 
(D)cores 
9.Which of the following is NOT mentioned in the passage as being a result of the Deep Sea 
Drilling Project? 
(A) Geologists were able to determine the Earth's appearance hundreds of millions of years ago. 
(B) Two geological theories became more widely accepted 
(C) Information was revealed about the Earth's past climatic changes. 
(D) Geologists observed forms of marine life never before seen. 
 
Question 10-21 
   Basic to any understanding of Canada in the 20 years after the Second World War is 
the country's impressive population growth. For every three Canadians in 1945, there 
Page 3


 1
1995-2000 Reading Full Test 
 
1995-08 
Questions 1-9 
The ocean bottom ------a region nearly 2.5 times greater than the total land area of the 
Earth ---- is a vast frontier that even today is largely unexplored and uncharted. Until 
about a century ago, the deep-ocean floor was completely inaccessible, hidden beneath 
waters averaging over 3,600 meters deep. Totally without light and subjected to intense 
pressures hundreds of times greater than at the Earth's surface, the deep-ocean bottom 
is a hostile environment to humans, in some ways as forbidding and remote as the void 
of outer space. 
    Although researchers have taken samples of deep-ocean rocks and sediments for 
over a century, the first detailed global investigation of the ocean bottom did not 
actually start until 1968, with the beginning of the National Science Foundation's Deep 
Sea Drilling Project (DSDP).Using techniques first developed for the offshore oil and 
gas industry, the DSDP's drill ship, the Glomar Challenger, was able to maintain a 
steady position on the ocean's surface and drill in very deep waters, extracting samples 
of sediments and rock from the ocean floor. 
    The Glomar Challenger completed 96 voyages in a 15-year research program that 
ended in November 1983. During this time, the vessel logged 600,000 kilometers and 
took almost 20,000 core samples of seabed sediments and rocks at 624 drilling sites 
around the world. The Glomar Challenger's core samples have allowed geologists 
to reconstruct what the planet looked like hundred of millions of years ago and to 
calculate what it will probably look like millions of years in the future. Today, largely 
on the strength of evidence gathered during the Glomar Challenger's voyages, nearly 
all earth scientists agree on the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift that 
explain many of the geological processes that shape the Earth. 
   The cores of sediment drilled by the Glomar Challenger have also yielded 
information critical to understanding the world's past climates. Deep-ocean sediments 
provide a climatic record stretching back hundreds of millions of years, because they 
are largely isolated from the mechanical erosion and the intense chemical and biological 
activity that rapidly destroy much land-based evidence of past climates. This record has 
already provided insights into the patterns and causes of past climatic change --- 
information that may be used to predict future climates. 
 
1.The author refers to the ocean bottom as a "frontier" in line 2 because it 
(A)is not a popular area for scientific research 
(B)contains a wide variety of life forms 
(C)attracts courageous explorers 
(D)is an unknown territory 
2.The word "inaccessible" in line 3 is closest in meaning to 
(A)unrecognizable 
 
 2
(B)unreachable 
(C)unusable 
(D)unsafe 
3.The author mentions outer space in line 7 because 
(A)the Earth's climate millions of years ago was similar to conditions in outer space. 
(B)it is similar to the ocean floor in being alien to the human environment 
(C)rock formations in outer space are similar to those found on the ocean floor 
(D)techniques used by scientists to explore outer space were similar to those used in ocean 
exploration 
4. Which of the following is true of the Glomar Challenger? 
(A) It is a type of submarine. 
(B) It is an ongoing project. 
(C) It has gone on over 100 voyages 
(D) It made its first DSDP voyage in 1968 
5. The word " extracting " in line 13 is closest in meaning to 
(A) breaking 
(B) locating 
(C) removing 
(D) analyzing 
6. The deep Sea Drilling Project was significant because it was 
(A) an attempt to find new sources of oil and gas 
(B) the first extensive exploration of the ocean bottom 
(C) composed of geologists form all over the world 
(D) funded entirely by the gas and oil industry 
7. The word " strength " in line21 is closest in meaning to 
(A)basis 
(B)purpose 
(C)discovery 
(D)endurance 
8.The word " they " in line26 refers to 
(A)years 
(B)climates 
(C)sediments 
(D)cores 
9.Which of the following is NOT mentioned in the passage as being a result of the Deep Sea 
Drilling Project? 
(A) Geologists were able to determine the Earth's appearance hundreds of millions of years ago. 
(B) Two geological theories became more widely accepted 
(C) Information was revealed about the Earth's past climatic changes. 
(D) Geologists observed forms of marine life never before seen. 
 
Question 10-21 
   Basic to any understanding of Canada in the 20 years after the Second World War is 
the country's impressive population growth. For every three Canadians in 1945, there 
 
 3
were over five in 1966. In September 1966 Canada's population passed the 20 million 
mark. Most of this surging growth came from natural increase. The depression of the 
1930's and the war had held back marriages, and the catching-up process began after 
1945. The baby boom continued through the decade of the1950's, producing a 
population increase of nearly fifteen percent in the five years from 1951 to 1956. This 
rate of increase had been exceeded only once before in Canada's history, in the decade 
before 1911. when the prairies were being settled. Undoubtedly, the good economic 
conditions of the 1950's supported a growth in the population, but the expansion also 
derived from a trend toward earlier marriages and an increase in the average size of 
families. In 1957 the Canadian birth rate stood at 28 per thousand, one of the highest in 
the world. 
   After the peak year of 1957, the birth rate in Canada began to decline. It continued 
falling until in 1966 it stood at the lowest level in 25 years. Partly this decline reflected 
the low level of births during the depression and the war, but it was also caused by 
changes in Canadian society. Young people were staying at school longer; more 
women were working; young married couples were buying automobiles or houses 
before starting families; rising living standards were cutting down the size of families. 
It appeared that Canada was once more falling in step with the trend toward smaller 
families that had occurred all through the Western world since the time of the Industrial 
Revolution. 
   Although the growth in Canada's population had slowed down by 1966 (the 
increase in the first half of the 1960's was only nine percent), another large population 
wave was coming over the horizon. It would be composed of the children  
who were born during the period of the high birth rate prior to 1957. 
 
10. What does the passage mainly discuss? 
(A) Educational changes in Canadian society 
(B) Canada during the Second World War 
(C) Population trends in postwar Canada 
(D) Standards of living in Canada 
11. According to the passage, when did Canada's baby boom begin? 
(A) In the decade after 1911 
(B) After 1945 
(C) During the depression of the 1930's 
(D) In 1966 
12. The word "five" in line 3 refers to 
(A) Canadians 
(B) years 
(C) decades 
(D) marriages 
13. The word "surging" in line 4 is closest in meaning to 
(A) new 
(B) extra 
(C) accelerating 
Page 4


 1
1995-2000 Reading Full Test 
 
1995-08 
Questions 1-9 
The ocean bottom ------a region nearly 2.5 times greater than the total land area of the 
Earth ---- is a vast frontier that even today is largely unexplored and uncharted. Until 
about a century ago, the deep-ocean floor was completely inaccessible, hidden beneath 
waters averaging over 3,600 meters deep. Totally without light and subjected to intense 
pressures hundreds of times greater than at the Earth's surface, the deep-ocean bottom 
is a hostile environment to humans, in some ways as forbidding and remote as the void 
of outer space. 
    Although researchers have taken samples of deep-ocean rocks and sediments for 
over a century, the first detailed global investigation of the ocean bottom did not 
actually start until 1968, with the beginning of the National Science Foundation's Deep 
Sea Drilling Project (DSDP).Using techniques first developed for the offshore oil and 
gas industry, the DSDP's drill ship, the Glomar Challenger, was able to maintain a 
steady position on the ocean's surface and drill in very deep waters, extracting samples 
of sediments and rock from the ocean floor. 
    The Glomar Challenger completed 96 voyages in a 15-year research program that 
ended in November 1983. During this time, the vessel logged 600,000 kilometers and 
took almost 20,000 core samples of seabed sediments and rocks at 624 drilling sites 
around the world. The Glomar Challenger's core samples have allowed geologists 
to reconstruct what the planet looked like hundred of millions of years ago and to 
calculate what it will probably look like millions of years in the future. Today, largely 
on the strength of evidence gathered during the Glomar Challenger's voyages, nearly 
all earth scientists agree on the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift that 
explain many of the geological processes that shape the Earth. 
   The cores of sediment drilled by the Glomar Challenger have also yielded 
information critical to understanding the world's past climates. Deep-ocean sediments 
provide a climatic record stretching back hundreds of millions of years, because they 
are largely isolated from the mechanical erosion and the intense chemical and biological 
activity that rapidly destroy much land-based evidence of past climates. This record has 
already provided insights into the patterns and causes of past climatic change --- 
information that may be used to predict future climates. 
 
1.The author refers to the ocean bottom as a "frontier" in line 2 because it 
(A)is not a popular area for scientific research 
(B)contains a wide variety of life forms 
(C)attracts courageous explorers 
(D)is an unknown territory 
2.The word "inaccessible" in line 3 is closest in meaning to 
(A)unrecognizable 
 
 2
(B)unreachable 
(C)unusable 
(D)unsafe 
3.The author mentions outer space in line 7 because 
(A)the Earth's climate millions of years ago was similar to conditions in outer space. 
(B)it is similar to the ocean floor in being alien to the human environment 
(C)rock formations in outer space are similar to those found on the ocean floor 
(D)techniques used by scientists to explore outer space were similar to those used in ocean 
exploration 
4. Which of the following is true of the Glomar Challenger? 
(A) It is a type of submarine. 
(B) It is an ongoing project. 
(C) It has gone on over 100 voyages 
(D) It made its first DSDP voyage in 1968 
5. The word " extracting " in line 13 is closest in meaning to 
(A) breaking 
(B) locating 
(C) removing 
(D) analyzing 
6. The deep Sea Drilling Project was significant because it was 
(A) an attempt to find new sources of oil and gas 
(B) the first extensive exploration of the ocean bottom 
(C) composed of geologists form all over the world 
(D) funded entirely by the gas and oil industry 
7. The word " strength " in line21 is closest in meaning to 
(A)basis 
(B)purpose 
(C)discovery 
(D)endurance 
8.The word " they " in line26 refers to 
(A)years 
(B)climates 
(C)sediments 
(D)cores 
9.Which of the following is NOT mentioned in the passage as being a result of the Deep Sea 
Drilling Project? 
(A) Geologists were able to determine the Earth's appearance hundreds of millions of years ago. 
(B) Two geological theories became more widely accepted 
(C) Information was revealed about the Earth's past climatic changes. 
(D) Geologists observed forms of marine life never before seen. 
 
Question 10-21 
   Basic to any understanding of Canada in the 20 years after the Second World War is 
the country's impressive population growth. For every three Canadians in 1945, there 
 
 3
were over five in 1966. In September 1966 Canada's population passed the 20 million 
mark. Most of this surging growth came from natural increase. The depression of the 
1930's and the war had held back marriages, and the catching-up process began after 
1945. The baby boom continued through the decade of the1950's, producing a 
population increase of nearly fifteen percent in the five years from 1951 to 1956. This 
rate of increase had been exceeded only once before in Canada's history, in the decade 
before 1911. when the prairies were being settled. Undoubtedly, the good economic 
conditions of the 1950's supported a growth in the population, but the expansion also 
derived from a trend toward earlier marriages and an increase in the average size of 
families. In 1957 the Canadian birth rate stood at 28 per thousand, one of the highest in 
the world. 
   After the peak year of 1957, the birth rate in Canada began to decline. It continued 
falling until in 1966 it stood at the lowest level in 25 years. Partly this decline reflected 
the low level of births during the depression and the war, but it was also caused by 
changes in Canadian society. Young people were staying at school longer; more 
women were working; young married couples were buying automobiles or houses 
before starting families; rising living standards were cutting down the size of families. 
It appeared that Canada was once more falling in step with the trend toward smaller 
families that had occurred all through the Western world since the time of the Industrial 
Revolution. 
   Although the growth in Canada's population had slowed down by 1966 (the 
increase in the first half of the 1960's was only nine percent), another large population 
wave was coming over the horizon. It would be composed of the children  
who were born during the period of the high birth rate prior to 1957. 
 
10. What does the passage mainly discuss? 
(A) Educational changes in Canadian society 
(B) Canada during the Second World War 
(C) Population trends in postwar Canada 
(D) Standards of living in Canada 
11. According to the passage, when did Canada's baby boom begin? 
(A) In the decade after 1911 
(B) After 1945 
(C) During the depression of the 1930's 
(D) In 1966 
12. The word "five" in line 3 refers to 
(A) Canadians 
(B) years 
(C) decades 
(D) marriages 
13. The word "surging" in line 4 is closest in meaning to 
(A) new 
(B) extra 
(C) accelerating 
 4
(D) surprising 
14. The author suggests that in Canada during the1950's 
(A) the urban population decreased rapidly 
(B) fewer people married 
(C) economic conditions were poor 
(D) the birth rate was very high 
15. The word "trend" in line 11 is closest in meaning to 
(A) tendency 
(B) aim 
(C) growth 
(D) directive 
16. The word "peak" in line 14 is closest in meaning to 
(A) pointed 
(B) dismal 
(C) mountain 
(D) maximum 
17. When was the birth rate in Canada at its lowest postwar level? 
(A) 1966 
(B) 1957 
(C) 1956 
(D) 1951 
18. The author mentions all of the following as causes of declines in population growth after 1957 
EXCEPT 
(A) people being better educated 
(B) people getting married earlier 
(C) better standards of living 
(D) couples buying houses 
19. It can be inferred from the passage that before the Industrial Revolution 
(A) families were larger 
(B) population statistics were unreliable 
(C) the population grew steadily 
(D) economic conditions were bad 
20. The word "It" in line 25 refers to 
(A) horizon 
(B) population wave 
(C) nine percent 
(D) first half 
21. The phrase "prior to" in line 26 is closest in meaning to 
(A) behind 
(B) since 
(C) during 
(D) preceding 
 
Questions 22-30 
Page 5


 1
1995-2000 Reading Full Test 
 
1995-08 
Questions 1-9 
The ocean bottom ------a region nearly 2.5 times greater than the total land area of the 
Earth ---- is a vast frontier that even today is largely unexplored and uncharted. Until 
about a century ago, the deep-ocean floor was completely inaccessible, hidden beneath 
waters averaging over 3,600 meters deep. Totally without light and subjected to intense 
pressures hundreds of times greater than at the Earth's surface, the deep-ocean bottom 
is a hostile environment to humans, in some ways as forbidding and remote as the void 
of outer space. 
    Although researchers have taken samples of deep-ocean rocks and sediments for 
over a century, the first detailed global investigation of the ocean bottom did not 
actually start until 1968, with the beginning of the National Science Foundation's Deep 
Sea Drilling Project (DSDP).Using techniques first developed for the offshore oil and 
gas industry, the DSDP's drill ship, the Glomar Challenger, was able to maintain a 
steady position on the ocean's surface and drill in very deep waters, extracting samples 
of sediments and rock from the ocean floor. 
    The Glomar Challenger completed 96 voyages in a 15-year research program that 
ended in November 1983. During this time, the vessel logged 600,000 kilometers and 
took almost 20,000 core samples of seabed sediments and rocks at 624 drilling sites 
around the world. The Glomar Challenger's core samples have allowed geologists 
to reconstruct what the planet looked like hundred of millions of years ago and to 
calculate what it will probably look like millions of years in the future. Today, largely 
on the strength of evidence gathered during the Glomar Challenger's voyages, nearly 
all earth scientists agree on the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift that 
explain many of the geological processes that shape the Earth. 
   The cores of sediment drilled by the Glomar Challenger have also yielded 
information critical to understanding the world's past climates. Deep-ocean sediments 
provide a climatic record stretching back hundreds of millions of years, because they 
are largely isolated from the mechanical erosion and the intense chemical and biological 
activity that rapidly destroy much land-based evidence of past climates. This record has 
already provided insights into the patterns and causes of past climatic change --- 
information that may be used to predict future climates. 
 
1.The author refers to the ocean bottom as a "frontier" in line 2 because it 
(A)is not a popular area for scientific research 
(B)contains a wide variety of life forms 
(C)attracts courageous explorers 
(D)is an unknown territory 
2.The word "inaccessible" in line 3 is closest in meaning to 
(A)unrecognizable 
 
 2
(B)unreachable 
(C)unusable 
(D)unsafe 
3.The author mentions outer space in line 7 because 
(A)the Earth's climate millions of years ago was similar to conditions in outer space. 
(B)it is similar to the ocean floor in being alien to the human environment 
(C)rock formations in outer space are similar to those found on the ocean floor 
(D)techniques used by scientists to explore outer space were similar to those used in ocean 
exploration 
4. Which of the following is true of the Glomar Challenger? 
(A) It is a type of submarine. 
(B) It is an ongoing project. 
(C) It has gone on over 100 voyages 
(D) It made its first DSDP voyage in 1968 
5. The word " extracting " in line 13 is closest in meaning to 
(A) breaking 
(B) locating 
(C) removing 
(D) analyzing 
6. The deep Sea Drilling Project was significant because it was 
(A) an attempt to find new sources of oil and gas 
(B) the first extensive exploration of the ocean bottom 
(C) composed of geologists form all over the world 
(D) funded entirely by the gas and oil industry 
7. The word " strength " in line21 is closest in meaning to 
(A)basis 
(B)purpose 
(C)discovery 
(D)endurance 
8.The word " they " in line26 refers to 
(A)years 
(B)climates 
(C)sediments 
(D)cores 
9.Which of the following is NOT mentioned in the passage as being a result of the Deep Sea 
Drilling Project? 
(A) Geologists were able to determine the Earth's appearance hundreds of millions of years ago. 
(B) Two geological theories became more widely accepted 
(C) Information was revealed about the Earth's past climatic changes. 
(D) Geologists observed forms of marine life never before seen. 
 
Question 10-21 
   Basic to any understanding of Canada in the 20 years after the Second World War is 
the country's impressive population growth. For every three Canadians in 1945, there 
 
 3
were over five in 1966. In September 1966 Canada's population passed the 20 million 
mark. Most of this surging growth came from natural increase. The depression of the 
1930's and the war had held back marriages, and the catching-up process began after 
1945. The baby boom continued through the decade of the1950's, producing a 
population increase of nearly fifteen percent in the five years from 1951 to 1956. This 
rate of increase had been exceeded only once before in Canada's history, in the decade 
before 1911. when the prairies were being settled. Undoubtedly, the good economic 
conditions of the 1950's supported a growth in the population, but the expansion also 
derived from a trend toward earlier marriages and an increase in the average size of 
families. In 1957 the Canadian birth rate stood at 28 per thousand, one of the highest in 
the world. 
   After the peak year of 1957, the birth rate in Canada began to decline. It continued 
falling until in 1966 it stood at the lowest level in 25 years. Partly this decline reflected 
the low level of births during the depression and the war, but it was also caused by 
changes in Canadian society. Young people were staying at school longer; more 
women were working; young married couples were buying automobiles or houses 
before starting families; rising living standards were cutting down the size of families. 
It appeared that Canada was once more falling in step with the trend toward smaller 
families that had occurred all through the Western world since the time of the Industrial 
Revolution. 
   Although the growth in Canada's population had slowed down by 1966 (the 
increase in the first half of the 1960's was only nine percent), another large population 
wave was coming over the horizon. It would be composed of the children  
who were born during the period of the high birth rate prior to 1957. 
 
10. What does the passage mainly discuss? 
(A) Educational changes in Canadian society 
(B) Canada during the Second World War 
(C) Population trends in postwar Canada 
(D) Standards of living in Canada 
11. According to the passage, when did Canada's baby boom begin? 
(A) In the decade after 1911 
(B) After 1945 
(C) During the depression of the 1930's 
(D) In 1966 
12. The word "five" in line 3 refers to 
(A) Canadians 
(B) years 
(C) decades 
(D) marriages 
13. The word "surging" in line 4 is closest in meaning to 
(A) new 
(B) extra 
(C) accelerating 
 4
(D) surprising 
14. The author suggests that in Canada during the1950's 
(A) the urban population decreased rapidly 
(B) fewer people married 
(C) economic conditions were poor 
(D) the birth rate was very high 
15. The word "trend" in line 11 is closest in meaning to 
(A) tendency 
(B) aim 
(C) growth 
(D) directive 
16. The word "peak" in line 14 is closest in meaning to 
(A) pointed 
(B) dismal 
(C) mountain 
(D) maximum 
17. When was the birth rate in Canada at its lowest postwar level? 
(A) 1966 
(B) 1957 
(C) 1956 
(D) 1951 
18. The author mentions all of the following as causes of declines in population growth after 1957 
EXCEPT 
(A) people being better educated 
(B) people getting married earlier 
(C) better standards of living 
(D) couples buying houses 
19. It can be inferred from the passage that before the Industrial Revolution 
(A) families were larger 
(B) population statistics were unreliable 
(C) the population grew steadily 
(D) economic conditions were bad 
20. The word "It" in line 25 refers to 
(A) horizon 
(B) population wave 
(C) nine percent 
(D) first half 
21. The phrase "prior to" in line 26 is closest in meaning to 
(A) behind 
(B) since 
(C) during 
(D) preceding 
 
Questions 22-30 
 5
   Are organically grown foods the best food choices? The advantages claimed for 
such foods over conventionally grown and marketed food products are now being 
debated. Advocates of organic foods ----- a term whose meaning varies greatly --- 
frequently proclaim that such products are safer and more nutritious than others. 
   The growing interest of consumers in the safety and nutritional quality of the 
typical North American diet is a welcome development. However, much of this 
interest has been sparked by sweeping claims that the food supply is unsafe or 
inadequate in meeting nutritional needs. Although most of these claims are not 
supported by scientific evidence, the preponderance of written material advancing 
such claims makes it difficult for the general public to separate fact from fiction. 
As a result, claims that eating a diet consisting entirely of organically grown foods 
prevents or cures disease or provides other benefits to health have become widely 
publicized and form the basis for folklore. 
   Almost daily the public is besieged by claims for "no-aging" diets, new vitamins, 
and other wonder foods. There are numerous unsubstantiated reports that natural 
vitamins are superior to synthetic ones, that fertilized eggs are nutritionally superior 
to unfertilized eggs, that untreated grains are better than fumigated grains, and the like. 
   One thing that most organically grown food products seem to have in common is 
that they cost more than conventionally grown foods. But in many cases consumers are 
misled if they believe organic foods can maintain health and provide better nutritional 
quality than conventionally grown foods. So there is real cause for concern if consumers,  
particularly those with limited incomes, distrust the regular food supply and buy only 
expensive organic foods instead. 
 
22. The word "Advocates" in line 3 is closest in meaning to which of the following? 
(A) Proponents 
(B) Merchants 
(C) Inspectors 
(D) Consumers 
23. In line 4, the word "others" refers to 
(A) advantages 
(B) advocates 
(C) organic foods 
(D) products 
24. The "welcome development" mentioned in line 6 is an increase in 
(A) interest in food safety and nutrition among North Americans 
(B) the nutritional quality of the typical North American diet 
(C) the amount of healthy food grown in North America 
(D) the number of consumers in North America 
25. According to the first paragraph, which of the following is true about the term "organic foods"? 
(A) It is accepted by most nutritionists. 
(B) It has been used only in recent years. 
(C) It has no fixed meaning. 
(D) It is seldom used by consumers. 
Read More
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