Registration and Dissolution of a Firm (Part - 2) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

Business Laws for CA Foundation

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CA Foundation : Registration and Dissolution of a Firm (Part - 2) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

The document Registration and Dissolution of a Firm (Part - 2) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev is a part of the CA Foundation Course Business Laws for CA Foundation.
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CONSEQUENCES OF DISSOLUTION (SECTIONS 45 - 55):

Consequent to the dissolution of a partnership firm, the partners have certain rights and liabilities, as are discussed:

(a) Liability for acts of partners done after dissolution (Section 45): (1) Not with standing the dissolution of a firm, the partners continue to be liable as such to third parties for any act done by any of them which would have been an act of the firm if done before the dissolution, until public notice is given of the dissolution:

Provided that the estate of a partner who dies, or who is adjudicated an insolvent, or of a partner who, not having been known to the person dealing with the firm to be a partner, retires from the firm, is not liable under this section for acts done after the date on which he ceases to be a partner.

(2) Notices under sub-section (1) may be given by any partner.

Analysis

Section 45 has two fold objectives

1. It seeks to protect third parties dealing with the firm who had no notice of prior dissolution and

2. It also seeks to protect partners of a dissolved firm from liability towards third parties.

Example: X and Y who carried on business in partnership for several years, executed on December 1, a deed dissolving the partnership from the date, but failed to give a public notice of the dissolution. On December 20, X borrowed in the firm’s name a certain sum of money from R, who was ignorant of the dissolution. In such a case, Y also would be liable for the amount because no public notice was given.

However, there are exceptions to the rule stated in above example i.e even where notice of dissolution has not been given, there will be no liability for subsequent acts in the case of;

(a) the estate of a deceased partner,

(b) an insolvent partner, or

(c) a dormant partner, i.e., a partner, who was not known as a partner to the person dealing with the firm.

(b) Right of partners to have business wound up after dissolution (Section 46): On the dissolution of a firm every partner or his representative is entitled, as against all the other partners or their representative, to have the property of the firm applied in payment of the debts and liabilities of the firm, and to have the surplus distributed among the partners or their representatives according to their rights.

(c) Continuing authority of partners for purposes of winding up (Section 47): After the dissolution of a firm the authority of each partner to bind the firm, and the other mutual rights and obligations of the partners, continue notwithstanding the dissolution, so far as may be necessary to wind up the affairs of the firm and to complete transactions begun but unfinished at the time of the dissolution, but not otherwise:

Provided that the firm is in no case bound by the acts of a partner who has been adjudicated insolvent; but this proviso does not affect the liability of any person who has after the adjudication represented himself or knowingly permitted himself to be represented as a partner of the insolvent.

(d) Settlement of partnership accounts (Section 48): In settling the accounts of a firm after dissolution, the following rules shall, subject to agreement by the partners, be observed:

(i) Losses, including deficiencies of capital, shall be paid first out of profits, next out of capital, and, lastly, if necessary, by the partners individually in the proportions in which they were entitled to share profits.

(ii) The assets of the firm, including any sums contributed by the partners to make up deficiencies of capital, must be applied in the following manner and order:

(a) in paying the debts of the firm to third parties;

(b) in paying to each partner rateably what is due to him from capital;

(c) in paying to each partner rateably what is due to him on account of capital; and

(d) the residue, if any, shall be divided among the partners in the proportions in which they were entitled to share profits.

Analysis of Section 48

It may be noted that prima facie, accounts between the partners shall be settled in the manner prescribed by partnership agreement. The above-mentioned rules apply subject to any agreement between partners. The rules laid down in Section 48, just specified, as to what will be the mode of settlement of accounts in the usual course of business. But if the partners, by their agreement, express any different intention as to the mode in which losses will have to be borne eventually or the manner in which capital or advances will have to be paid to any partner, such an intention must be given effect to. However, any such agreement cannot affect the rights of the creditors of the firm.

The significance of the foregoing provisions is that if the assets of the firm are not sufficient to pay off the liabilities of the firm including the amount due to each partner on account of capital, each partner would individually be liable to contribute towards the losses, including deficiencies of capital, in the proportion in which he is entitled to share profits.

Example: X and Y were partners sharing profits and losses equally and X died. On taking partnership accounts, it transpired that he contributed Rs. 6,60,000 to the capital of the firm and Y only Rs. 40,000. The assets amounted to Rs. 2,00,000. The deficiency (Rs. 6,60,000 + Rs. 40,000 – Rs. 2,00,000 i.e. Rs. 5,00,000) would have to be shared equally by Y and X’s estate.

If in the above example, the agreement provided that on dissolution the surplus assets would be divided between the partners according to their respective interests in the capital and on the dissolution of the firm a deficiency of capital was found, then the assets would be divided between the partners in proportion to their capital with the result that X’s estate would be the main loser.

(e) Payment of firm debts and of separate debts (Section 49): Where there are joint debts due from the firm and also separate debts due from any partner:

(i) the property of the firm shall be applied in the first instance in payment of the debts of the firm, and if there is any surplus, then the share of each partner shall be applied to the payment of his separate debts or paid to him;

(ii) the separate property of any partner shall be applied first in the payment of his separate debts and surplus, if any, in the payment of debts of the firm.

(f) Personal profits earned after dissolution (Section 50): Where a firm is dissolved by the death of a partner and the surviving partners or the surviving partners along with the representatives of the deceased partner carry on business of the firm, any personal profits by them, before the firm is fully wound up, must be accounted for by them to other partners. Thus, a lease expiring on the death of a partner, which is renewed by the surviving partners, before final winding up, belongs to the partnership.

This section has to be read with Section 53 which provides that in the absence of an agreement to the contrary, each partner or his representative is entitled to restrain (by injunction) other partners from carrying on a similar business in the name of the firm or from using the property of the firm for their own benefit till the affairs of the firm are completely wound up.

(g) Return of premium on premature dissolution (Section 51): According to Section 51, in the case of dissolution of partnership earlier than the period fixed for it, the partner paying the premium is entitled to the return of the premium of such part thereof as may be reasonable, regard being had to the terms of agreement and to the length of time during which he was a partner, except when the partnership is dissolved:

(1) by the death of one of the partners;

(2) mainly due to the misconduct of the partner paying the premium;

(3) pursuant to an agreement containing no provisions for the return of the premium or any part thereof.

The partner paying the premium gets a proportionate part of the premium where the partnership is dissolved:

(1) Without the fault of either party; or

(2) owing to the fault of both; or

(3) on account of the fault of the partner receiving the premium; or

(4) due to the insolvency of the partner receiving the premium, where the partner paying the premium was unaware of the others embarrassing circumstances at the time of entering into the partnership.

(h) Rights where partnership contract is rescinded for fraud or misrepresentation (Section 52): Where a contract creating partnership is rescinded on the ground of fraud or misrepresentation of any of the parties thereto, the party entitled to rescind is entitled;

(1) to a lien on the surplus or the assets of the firm remaining after the debts of the firm have been paid, for any sum paid by him for the purchase of a share in the firm and for any capital contributed by him;

(2) to rank as a creditor of the firm in respect of any payment made by him towards the debts of the firm; and

(3) to an indemnity from the partners guilty of fraud or misrepresentation against all the debts of the firm.

(i) Sale of Goodwill after dissolution (Section 55): (1) In settling the accounts of a firm after dissolution, the goodwill shall, subject to contract between the partners, be included in the assets, and it may be sold either separately or along with other property of the firm.

Rights of buyer and seller of goodwill: (2) Where the goodwill of a firm is sold after dissolution, a partner may carry on a business competing with that of the buyer and he may advertise such business, but subject to agreement between him and the buyer, he may not,

(a) use the firm name,

(b) represent himself as carrying on the business of the firm, or

(c) solicit the custom of persons who were dealing with the firm before its dissolution. Agreement in restraint of trade:

(3) Any partner may, upon the sale of the goodwill of a firm, make an agreement with the buyer that such partner will not carry on any business similar to that of the firm within a specified period or within specified local limits, and, notwithstanding anything contained in section 27 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872 such agreement shall be valid if the restrictions imposed are reasonable.

Analysis: Goodwill is a part of the assets of the firm and section 55(1) enacts that in settling the accounts of a firm after dissolution, the goodwill shall, subject to contract between the partners, be included in the assets and it may be sold either separately or along with other property of the firm. The prima facie rule therefore is that the goodwill of the firm being a part of the assets has to be sold just like other assets before the accounts between the partners can be settled and the partnership wound up.


MODE OF GIVING PUBLIC NOTICE (SECTION 72)

Mode of giving public notice (Section 72): A public notice under this Act is given

(a) Where it relates to the retirement or expulsion of a partner from a registered firm, or to the dissolution of a registered firm, or to the election to become or not to become a partner in a registered firm by a person attainting majority who was admitted as a minor to the benefits of partnership, by notice to the Registrar of Firms under section 63, and by publication in the Official Gazette and in at least one vernacular newspaper circulation in the district where the firm to which it relates has its place or principal place of business, and

(b) in any other case, by publication in the Official Gazette and in at least one vernacular newspaper circulating in the district where the firm to which it relates has its place or principal place of business.

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