Relations of Partners (Part - 3) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

Business Laws for CA Foundation

Created by: Sushil Kumar

CA Foundation : Relations of Partners (Part - 3) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

The document Relations of Partners (Part - 3) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev is a part of the CA Foundation Course Business Laws for CA Foundation.
All you need of CA Foundation at this link: CA Foundation

RELATION OF PARTNERS TO THIRD PARTIES:
1. PARTNER TO BE AGENT OF THE FIRM (SECTION 18): Subject to the provisions of this Act, a partner is the agent of the firm for the purposes of the business of the firm.
Analysis of section 18:

You may recall that a partnership is the relationship between the partners who have agreed to share the profits of the business carried on by all or any of them acting for all (Section 4). This definition suggests that any of the partners can be the agent of the others.
Section 18 clarifies this position by providing that, subject to the provisions of the Act, a partner is the agent of the firm for the purpose of the business of the firm. The partner indeed virtually embraces the character of both a principal and an agent. So far as he acts for himself and in his own interest in the common concern of the partnership, he may properly be deemed a principal and so far as he acts for his partners, he may properly be deemed as an agent.

The principal distinction between him and a mere agent is that he has a community of interest with other partners in the whole property and business and liabilities of partnership, whereas an agent as such has no interest in either.
The rule that a partner is the agent of the firm for the purpose of the business of the firm cannot be applied to all transactions and dealings between the partners themselves. It is applicable only to the act done by partners for the purpose of the business of the firm.

2. IMPLIED AUTHORITY OF PARTNER AS AGENT OF THE FIRM (SECTION 19): Subject to the provisions of section 22, the act of a partner which is done to carry on, in the usual way, business of the kind carried on by the firm, binds the firm.

The authority of a partner to bind the firm conferred by this section is called his “implied authority”.
(2) In the absence of any usage or custom of trade to the contrary, the implied authority of a partner does not empower him to-

(a) Submit a dispute relating to the business of the firm to arbitration;

(b) open a banking account on behalf of the firm in his own name;

(c) compromise or relinquish any claim or portion of a claim by the firm;

(d) withdraw a suit or proceedings filed on behalf of the firm;

(e) admit any liability in a suit or proceedings against the firm;

(f) acquire immovable property on behalf of the firm;

(g) transfer immovable property belonging to the firm; and

(h) enter into partnership on behalf of the firm.

MODE OF DOING ACT TO BIND FIRM (SECTION 22): In order to bind a firm, an act or instrument done or executed by a partner or other person on behalf of the firm shall be done or executed in the firm name, or in any other manner expressing or implying an intention to bind the firm.

Analysis of section 19 and 22:

At the very outset, you should understand what is meant by “implied authority”. You have just read that every partner is an agent of the firm for the purpose of the business thereof. Consequently, as between the partners and the outside world (whatever may be their private arrangements between themselves), each partner is agent of every other in every matter connected with the partnership business; his acts bind the firm.

Sections 19(1) and 22 deal with the implied authority of a partner. The impact of these Sections is that the act of a partner which is done to carry on, in the usual way, business of the kind carried on by the firm binds the firm, provided that the act is done in the firm name, or any manner expressing or implying an intention to bind the firm. Such an authority of a partner to bind the firm is called his implied authority. It is however subject to the following restrictions:

1. The act done must relate to the usual business of the firm, that is, the act done by the partner must be within the scope of his authority and related to the normal business of the firm.

2. The act is such as is done for normal conduct of business of the firm. The usual way of carrying on the business will depend on the nature and circumstances of each particular case [Section 19(1)].

3. The act to be done in the name of the firm or in any other manner expressing or implying an intention to bind the firm (Section 22).

Thus, a partner has implied authority to bind the firm by all acts done by him in all matters connected with the partnership business and which are done in the usual way and are not in their nature beyond the scope of partnership. You must remember that an implied authority of a partner may differ in different kinds of business.

Example: X, a partner in a firm of solicitors, borrows money and executes a promissory note in the name of firm without authority. The other partners are not liable on the note, as it is not part of the ordinary business of a solicitor to draw, accept, or endorse negotiable instruments, however it may be usual for one partner of firm of bankers to draw, accept or endorse a bill of exchange on behalf of the firm. If partnership be of a general commercial nature,

(i) he may pledge or sell the partnership property;

(ii) he may buy goods on account of the partnership;

(iii) he may borrow money, contract debts and pay debts on account of the partnership;

(iv) he may draw, make, sign, endorse, transfer, negotiate and procure to be discounted, Promissory notes, bills of exchange, cheques and other negotiable papers in the name and on account of the partnership.

Section 19(2) contains the acts which are beyond the implied authority of the partners.
3. EXTENSION AND RESTRICTION OF PARTNERS’ IMPLIED AUTHORITY (SECTION 20):

According to section 20, the partners in a firm may, by contract between the partners, extend or restrict implied authority of any partners.

Not with standing any such restriction, any act done by a partner on behalf of the firm which falls within his implied authority binds the firm, unless the person with whom he is dealing knows of the restriction or does not know or believe that partner to be a partner.

Analysis of section 20: The implied authority of a partner may be extended or restricted by contract between the partners. Under the following conditions, the restrictions imposed on the implied authority of a partner by agreement shall be effective against a third party:

1. The third party knows about the restrictions, and

2. The third party does not know that he is dealing with a partner in a firm.
Example: A, a partner, borrows from B Rs. 1,000 in the name of the firm but in excess of his authority, and utilizes the same in paying off the debts of the firm. Here, the fact that the firm has contracted debts suggests that it is a trading firm, and as such it is within the implied authority of A to borrow money for the business of the firm. This implied authority, as you have noticed, may be restricted by an agreement between him and other partners. Now if B, the lender, is unaware of this restriction imposed on A, the firm will be liable to repay the money to B. On the contrary B’s awareness as to this restriction will absolve the firm of its liability to repay the amount to B.
It may be noted that the above-mentioned extension or restriction is only possible with the consent of all the partners. Any one partner, or even a majority of the partners, cannot restrict or extend the implied authority.
4. PARTNER’S AUTHORITY IN AN EMERGENCY (SECTION 21)

According to section 21,
A partner has authority, in an emergency, to do all such acts for the purpose of protecting the firm from loss as would be done by a person of ordinary prudence, in his own case, acting under similar circumstances, and such acts bind the firm.


EFFECT OF ADMISSIONS BY A PARTNER (SECTION 23):

According to section 23,

an admission or representation made by a partner concerning the affairs of the firm is evidence against the firm, if it is made in the ordinary course of business.

Analysis of section 23:

Partners, as agents of each other can make binding admissions but only in relation to partnership transaction and in the ordinary course of business. An admission or representation by a partner will not however, bind the firm if his authority on the point is limited and the other party knows of the restriction. The section speaks of admissions and representations being evidenced against the firm. That is to say, they will affect the firm when tendered by third parties; they may not have the same effect in case of disputes between the partners themselves.

Example: X and Y are partners in a firm dealing in spare parts of different brands of motorcycle bikes. Z purchases a spare part for his Yamaha motorcycle after being told by X that the spare part is suitable for his motorcycle. Y is ignorant about this transaction. The spare part proves to be unsuitable for the motorcycle and it is damaged. X and Y both are responsible to Z for his loss.


EFFECT OF NOTICE TO ACTING PARTNER (SECTION 24)

According to section 24,

notice to a partner who habitually acts in the business of the firm of any matter relating to the affairs of the firm operates as notice to the firm, except in the case of a fraud on the firm committed by or with the consent of that partner.

Analysis of section 24:

The notice to a partner, who habitually acts in business of the firm, on matters relating to the affairs of the firm, operates as a notice to the firm except in the case of a fraud on the firm committed by or with the consent of that partner. Thus, the notice to one is equivalent to the notice to the rest of the partners of the firm, just as a notice to an agent is notice to his principal. This notice must be actual and not constructive. It must be received by a working partner and not by a sleeping partner. It must further relate to the firm’s business. Only then it would constitute a notice to the firm.

Example: P, Q, and R are partners in a business for purchase and sale of second hand goods. R purchases a second hand car on behalf of the firm from S. In the course of dealings with S, he comes to know that the car is a stolen one and it actually belongs to X. P and Q are ignorant about it. All the partners are liable to X, the real owner.

The only exception would lie in the case of fraud, whether active or tacit.

Example: A, a partner who actively participates in the management of the business of the firm, bought for his firm, certain goods, while he knew of a particular defect in the goods. His knowledge as regards the defect,ordinarily, would be construed as the knowledge of the firm, though the other partners in fact were not aware of the defect. But because A had, in league with his seller, conspired to conceal the defect from the other partners, the rule would be inoperative and the other partners would be entitled to reject the goods, upon detection by them of the defect.

Complete Syllabus of CA Foundation

Dynamic Test

Content Category

Related Searches

shortcuts and tricks

,

Viva Questions

,

mock tests for examination

,

Sample Paper

,

study material

,

ppt

,

pdf

,

Free

,

Relations of Partners (Part - 3) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

,

practice quizzes

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Semester Notes

,

Exam

,

Important questions

,

Relations of Partners (Part - 3) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

,

Summary

,

video lectures

,

Extra Questions

,

Relations of Partners (Part - 3) CA Foundation Notes | EduRev

,

Objective type Questions

,

MCQs

,

past year papers

;