SST Set - 17 (Q.17 to 32) Class 10 Notes | EduRev

Social Science (SST) Class 10 - Model Test Papers

Class 10 : SST Set - 17 (Q.17 to 32) Class 10 Notes | EduRev

The document SST Set - 17 (Q.17 to 32) Class 10 Notes | EduRev is a part of the Class 10 Course Social Science (SST) Class 10 - Model Test Papers.
All you need of Class 10 at this link: Class 10

Q.17. Why is the productivity of rice lower than that achieved for wheat? What are the steps taken to improve it? (Answer in about 150 words)

Ans. Rice is a tropical monsoon crop requiring high temperature and heavy rainfall. Where rainfall exceeds 200 cms, rice is dominant and with less than 100 cm. rains it can grow only with irrigation.

  • The North-east region has heavy rainfall and more than 80% of the area is under rice. In the south with less rainfall 30-40% is under rice whereas in north and central India rice is grown under irrigation.
  • The North-east with its plentiful water has the best capacity for rice cultivation. Poor productivity is due to dismanagement of water resources and primitive methods of cultivation. Rice is not suited to mechanical cultivation on a large scale and depends more on manual labour.
  • Programmes such as Special Rice Production Programme (SRPP) aim to introduce better water management techniques, HYV seeds, Bio-fertilisers (which will not be washed away with heavy rains like chemical fertilisers) and other methods for improving productivity.
  • Integrated Cereals Development Programme in Rice based Cropping System Area (ICDP-Rice) are being implemented in 1994-95.
  • During 2004-05 the production of rice was 871 lakh tonnes.

Q.18. What are the criteria for classification of Indian rivers into major, medium and minor rivers? What's the importance of river basins.

Ans : 1. Major rivers are those having a catchment area of over 20,000 square, km. These are large rivers in heavy rainfall areas.
2. Medium rivers have catchment areas between 2000 to 20,000 square km.
3. Minor rivers have catchment areas less than 2000 sq km.
There are 14 major river basins in India. The River basin is a separate hydrological unit and is useful for planning the utilisation of water resources for irrigation, power development, navigation and similar objectives. Their importance is only related to the harnessing of water resources.
They are not useful for other purposes as river basins have varying physiographic and climatic conditions and are not homogeneous regions. The exploitation of river water resources requires integrated planning and a degree of co-operation and understanding between the State concerned for sharing the burdens and benefits in an equitable manner.

Q.19. Discuss the use fixers of biofertilizer.  How can it be more useful?

Ans :  

  • Although nitrogen fixers are present in the soil, enrichment of soil with effective strains is much beneficial for the crop yields.
  • Chemical fertilizers have temporary effect while biofertilizers have permanent effect without any production problem. Use of composite biofertilizers can increase soil fertility.
  • The cost is too much low for the biofertilizers and its proper use does not only include a correct application of the inoculant to the seed or soil, but also good crop management and provision of additional capital nutrients for the plants and inoculum.
  • Biofertilizers are cost effective, cheap, and renewable source to supplement the chemical fertilizers. The Rhizobium inoculant has been found to be effective for pulses and legume oilseeds like soyabeans, groundnut and the blue-green algae for low land paddy in our country.
  • The legumes are being used as the soil improving crops and inter-crop or in rotation with cereal grains and other high energy crops as is being practised in China, South America, Africa, Phillipines and in India. They are becoming a part of cropping system research in total farming systems.
  •  Active linkages of scientists engaged in basic fundamental research in biological nitrogen fixation with those in mission-oriented, applied, and problem-solving research would speed the process.
  • Considering the prospects of biofertilizer in the country, the biofertilizer development centres are being established both in government and private sector. It is possible to establish joint venture in biofertilizer agro based industry.

Q.20. What India should do to iron out some of the major deficiencies and revitative the agri-sector to become a growth machine ?

Ans :  

  • It should set up a “national bio-technology venture capital fund” to support and direct investment for the induction of bio-technological tools to improve yields. In addition, develop a large pool of trained extension workers to take this technology to the farmer.
  • Cultivate crops which give a distinct competitive advantage in world markets. India must be in a position to capture large market share in these crops to the extent of financing our imports through the exports of these produce.
  • Reduce post-harvest losses due to poor handling, storage and shoddy processing by technological upgradation.
  • Stimulate investment in processing by giving adequate incentives such as a ten-year tax break to companies setting up agri-processing complex in rural/backward areas.
  • Abolish octroi, entry and sales tax. Substitute these with a single point tax, on agri-produce, at a specified uniform rate, and permit free movement of agricultural produce across the country.
  • Resolve GATT issues urgently to exploit the advantage of a post-GATT trade scenario where Indian agri-exports will become more price competitive.
  • Expand the definition of plantation industries to include oilpalm, cashew and horticulture by bringing them out of the purview of the Land Ceilings Act. To abate declining forest cover ‘hardwood plantations’ must be encouraged and included in the category of plantation crops.
  • Make companies play a predominant role in linking farmers to the banking system and capital markets. They must channel farm savings into productive uses and also provide credit at competitive rates. In addition, farmers must be aided in actively participating in the capital markets.
  •  Give the choice to farmers and corporations to hedge products on international commodity exchanges to minimise the risk of price fluctuations. The Government must develop a model preferably in collaboration with the Chicago Board of Trade.
  •  Invite farmer participation in equity in agricultural companies up to, say, 20 per cent of the equity. This will transform the corporate sector into a ‘co-operative sector.’
  • Right actions can collectively lift Indian agriculture to global leadership in a short time.

Q.21. Discuss briefly the measures to enhance  rice export.

Ans :

  • Redefining export grades and restricting to cultivation of those few varieties.
  • Organising production and supply of quality seeds.
  • Organising cultivation, procurement and processing of export quality rices.
  • Modernising milling-processing industry.
  • Maintaining quality control at all levels, preferably by a strong independent agency.
  • Planning of strategies and intensive research for market development.
  • Expanding and improving storage facilities at sea ports.
  • Introducing two levels of minimum export price for two grades of basmati quality rices.
  • Creating a rice export promotion council.
  • Rice supply prospects for the Nineties and into the 21st century are not likely to be strong. With enough room and good opportunities for increasing rice yield, which is one of the lowest, prospects are bright for achieving targetted production growth and leaving a sizeable and stable surplus for export—the surplus always as value-added export quality rice.
  • In rice trade, success and survival also depends on wisdom and determination to develop and nurture a regular, reliable and remunerative market for Indian rice.

Q.22. What are the reasons for the rapid growth of rubber industry?

Ans :

  • India is today the fourth largest natural-rubber-producing country, after Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia, with eight lakh small holders. The average size of a small holding is only 0.5 hectare whereas the productivity compares with that of Malaysia, the pioneer in the industry.
  • The main reasons for the rapid growth of rubber industry are:
    • Attractive financial and technical incentives from the Rubber Board for new planting and replanting.
    • Efficient and wide extension network.
    • Remunerative stable price.
    • The  clone RRII 105, a prolific yielder compared to all other cultivators, both indigenous and imported.
  • From 1993-94 onwards, the Board had commenced implementation of a five-year World Bank Rubber Development Project which consists of the following components:
    • Replanting of 40,000 hectares of old and uneconomic plantations.
    • New planting in 30,000 hectares.
    • Enhancing productivity in 60,000 hectares.
  •  There are provisions for improving processing facilities and strengthening the research and training activities of the Board.
  • Under the project, the planting assistance to growers was enhanced from Rs. 5,000 to Rs. 8,000 per hectare and from Rs. 2,700 to Rs. 3,000 per hectare for poly-bagged plants. The total investment proposed under the project was Rs 453 crores.

Q.23. India's export performance of fresh vegetables is not encouraging and is erratic. Discuss.

Ans :

  • Indian has not been able to achieve a consistent export performance growth rate due to several constraints. The trade and production base of vegetables are not properly linked and this has resulted in the export of only the surplus vegetables from terminal markets mainly in Bombay and Delhi.
  • A system of growing exclusively for export has not been made possible and suitable varieties, quality standards, volume and period of requirements have not been taken into consideration in developing a search and development (R&D) support to exports.
  • Even though in the case of onion, the Associated Agricultural Development Foundation (a subsidiary of NAFED) is engaged in developing production technology for export of good quality onion bulbs, uniform quality in respect of shape, size, colour and shelf-life have not been attained. This is due to inefficient seed production and distribution of even the improved open-pollinated varieties. A sizeable part of the kharif crop is exported during December-April from Maharashtra and Gujarat.
  • Vegetable production is mostly confined to the periphery of metropolitan cities and major towns. So the production cost is higher due to high cost of land, labour and other inputs. Till now transportation was a limiting factor for export of fresh vegetables. But improved road links have partly solved the problem.
  • However, the cool chain, from farm to delivery points through refrigerated transport (as for fish, milk or grape) and cold storage, has not been established fully for vegetables. Expensive air freight and inadequate cargo space are other limitations. Some beginning has been made to charter refrigerated container vessels for mango and grape exports.
  • Absence of a suitable variety is keenly felt in okra, which accounts for a sizeable share in fresh vegetable export. The requirement is that fruits should be small and roundish instead of the long and ridged grown for the domestic market. The research effort should therefore be given priority.
  • In case of processed vegetables major constraints have been poor technology and development of quality products. Another factor is high cost of production of raw material due to smallness of land holdings and low productivity.
  • Cost of production of processed vegetables can be brought down by extensive mechanised cultivation of varieties captive to processing factories. This, however, is not possible due to the Land Ceiling Act.
  • Besides, intensive R & D efforts are needed to reduce the cost of production of processed products, improve quality and adopt advanced technologies.

Q.24. Discuss the flower export strategies of India.

Ans :

  • India has a good potential for entering global trade as certain flowers and plants are grown in climates peculiar to India. Hence, the Government has prioritised floriculture.
  • Several industries either on their own, or in collaboration with multinational companies, have shown keen interest in this capital intensive high-tech production. Some of these have already gone into production and many more will come into operation soon.
  • Roses, carnations, chrysanthemums, orchids, gladioli, dry flowers, live plants and micro-propagated plantlets are potential export commodities. An intensive mobilisation of all the resources would certainly increase the exports.
  • The strategies are:
    • Identification of product/region as “intensive floriculture zone” to achieve qualitative and specified targets.
    • Creation of appropriate infrastructure and suitable technology and equipment for as pre-cooling and cool storage facilities.
    • Making available on a large scale planting materials and production inputs such as fertilizers, pesticides, media and packaging materials.
    • Adopting export specific market production. Government has announced a major change in the policy for 100 per cent export oriented units. Floriculture trade shall be permitted to sell 50 per cent of their production in the domestic market. This will enable floral units to dispose their surplus in the domestic market.
    • Strengthening the market intelligence network which will provide advice to producers regarding demand/supply position in the international market and also negotiate the price for Indian products. These networks may also provide latest practices in grading, packing and consumer preferences.
    • Establishing service centres cum auction houses in potential zones.
    • Giving importance to production promotion activities and advertising.
    • Creation and formation of co-operative florist organisations to safeguard the producers/growers and enable them to control the marketing of their products.
    • The Government should support to the industry as a whole and export oriented floriculture in particular.
  • International trade scene is fast changing and opportunities appear only for brief periods. India should seize this opportunity.

Q.25. Write a note on the Nalanda Mahavihara.

Ans : According to the Buddhist tradition, Nalanda, which grew to be the foremost Buddhist monastery and educational century in North India, was founded in the 5th century A.D. by Sakraditya, who is generally identified with the Gupta King Kumaragupta I (414-455 A.D.). The excavations at Nalanda have revealed a large area of well constructed monasteries and temples.  These buildings were raised and renovated over a period of 700 years from the 5th century onwards.  
Nalanda Mahavihara was the most famous Buddhist centre of its times, which maintained a great Buddhist university meant for monks.  The Buddhist philosophy of the Mahayana School was taught here.  It is said to have had as many as 10,000 students, all monks. According to Huen Tsang the great monastery at Nalanda was supported from the revenues of 100 villages.  Nalanda thus had a huge monastic establishment in the time of Harshavardhan. The fame of Nalanda Mahavihara spread far and wide mainly on account of its being the seat of a great university.  The Chinese traveller Huen Tsag studied there for several years as did also I-tsing. The former found thousands of scholars flocking to this famous centre of learning from the distant parts of Asia, and the scholars of this University were looked upon as model by every Indian.  Huen Tsang says that, here in all its branches, but even other works such as the Vedas, Logic, Grammar, Medicine etc. and discoursed were given from 100 pulpits every day.  Huen Tsang was impressed by the atmosphere of learning that prevailed at Nalanda.  Nalanda was meant for advanced students only, and the candidates for admission had to pass a sever preliminary test. The teachers and students were men of the highest ability and talent.  
Piety of generations of Kings not only adorned Nalanda Mahavihara with magnificent buildings but supplied all the material necessaries for the teachers and the taught.  Thus it provided free educational facilities and residence for most of its students.  In the 8th century A.D., Devapala patronized the institution and took active part in its management and administration.  Before that it was patronized by the Gupta Kings and Harshavardhana.  This great monastery of Nalanda was to a large extent responsible for spreading Indian culture in many countries like Tibet, China, Central Asia and Southeast Asia.  Nalanda continued to flourish in India for many centuries till it was destroyed towards the end of 12th century by Bakhtiyar Khilji.  

Q.26.  Write short notes on the following : 1.  Aihole 2. Amaravati, 3. Anuradhapur 4. Badami 5. Bhagwanpura, 6. Girnar,  7. Kausambi 8. Kusinagara 

Ans : 1. Aihole : The place is situated near Badami. It is famous for its rock cut temples in Chalukyan style. Famous for its eulogical inscription of Chalukyan king "Pulakeshin II', written by court poet "Ravi Kirti"
2. Amaravati : Situated near modern Vijaywada. It is famous for Buddhist stupas. It was the centre of art during Satvahanas rule. It was an important centre of trade with Burma and Indonesia.
3. Anuradhapur : Capital city of Sri Lanka. Ashoka sent his brother Mahindera as a Buddhist missionary to this place. The place was burnt later by Chola king Rejendra I.
4. Badami : The place is also known as Vatapi. Situated in modern Bijapur District, the place was founded by Pulakeshin I and later became the capital of western Chalukyas. Famous for its cave temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu.
5. Bhagwanpura : An important site of later vedic period. Excavation reveals a forty room mud house which throws light on family structure during vedic period.
6. Girnar : It was situated near Junagadh in Gujarat. Pushyagupta, a Mauryan Governor built famous Sudershan lake here. Famous inscription in chaste Sanskrit, issued by Saka ruler "Rudradaman" was found here.
7. Kausambi : It was an important port town of late vedic period. It was the seat of authority of Vatsa kingdom. The place is famous for Ashokan pillar and Kushana inscriptions.
8. Kusinagara : It is situated in the modern Deoria District of U.P. It was the capital of Mallas during ancient period. The place is famous for Buddha's Parinirvana. Ashok built a stone stupa to commemorate Buddha parinirvana.

Q.27.  What are the significance of Alauddin Khilji's economic regulation for his imperialism?

Ans. For Imperialist Policy any monarch need to have a large, efficient and standing army. For maintaining such a army, one need to have a sound financial system and enough revenues at disposal. And Alauddin's economic regulation were directed towards such a goal.
From the very beginning, Alauddin had imperialist aims. He had launched himself on numerous campaigns all around to increase the territorial extent of his empire., He had recruited a large army and stuck to dagh (branding of horses) and Chehra (Minister roll of soldiers). He paid his soldiers in cash, because they were on constant move.
To meet these Alauddin introduced market regulation and agrarian reforms, as he could not pay more to his soldiers. The make them available the needful on such prices that could satisfy his needs because a Cavalry man of those days was a gentleman trooper, he tried to control the prices of goods in the markets. Strict vigil was kept on fraudulent merchants and they were punished. To maintain stability of prices required supply of goods constantly. For this the emperor took initiative.
To maintain food grain prices and supply of foodgrains to market, he asked peasants of Loabs to pay in kind, which were carried by banjaras to capital & other places and there stood in store homes. Even land revenue of doab was raised to half of the produce. But regulation of prices of other goods did not affect much to the peasants, thus there was no rebellion or fights of peasant.
To supply good quality horses Multanis and Khurasanis were given loans and advances and their prices were fixed to make soldier affordable to pay for it.
The prices of costly and luxury items were also regulated, because it was thought that rise in price in this sector would affect the prices in other sector.
Thus, we see that Alauddin's regulation were through and wonderful for those days. This enabled him to recruit huge army at low cost, with which he was able to carry out his imperialistic ambitions and protect his empire against the Mongol threat from North West.

Q.28. Who  is regared as the empire-builder in North India of the Sixteenth Century?

Ans. Prior to Akbar, there were attempts to build an empire in north India by Babar but he could not succeed and he died soon. His son and Successor Humayun was capable of but certain quirk of fate denied him and he was dispossessed of his dominion by Sher Shah of Sur dynasty, who had the real potential and vigour and energy for such. But when it seemed that Sher Shah had achieved his ambition of building an empire in north India, he was accidently killed in gun powder blast at Kalinjar in 1545. But his various reforms regarding army and land revenue were to become the base of such by Akbar  the real empire builder.
Akbar ascended the throne at the age of 14. Initially he had to get out of the control of powerful nobles and machinations of his foster mother Maham Anaga. After he came out of their influence, he launched on his ambition of building an empire.
Akbar from the very beginning had a clear notion of the nature of his rule and the cause of his administration. He tried to make his empire really suited to soil. He emphasised the religious tolerance towards his subjects. Removed Jaziya and Pilgrim tax, considered obnoxious by the Hindus.
He defeated rulers and gave them opportunity to make peace with the Monarch. He incorporated them in the Imperial Service as friend, confidant and Mansabdars.
He made matrimonial alliances with the leading monarchies of the day irrespective of religion. He allowed his numerous wives to  pursue their own religions.
He built his administration on a composite pattern-mixing of people of different race and religion. He devised the Mansabdari System which was administrative as well as militaristic in nature. This helped in efficient administration as well as easy recruitment for the army.
Thus by building a system where all nobles-past and native ones even felt a part of the system-even if they were defeated old ruling homes. There was no recurring rebellion during his rule. This pattern of administration and nature of the nobility remained so till the last of the Mughal rule, and only when such characters began to decline that the decline of the Imperial house began to set in.

Q.29.  Write notes on the Mughals and European trading companies.

Ans. The Portuguese had established a direct sea route between India and West. They had their base of operation in South India-especially the Malabar coast from the very beginning; since 1498, when Vasco do Gama landed on Indian soil.
At the beginning of 1600 (17th) we find East India Company of Great Britain being set up. Soon the Dutch follow. The main purpose of these companies was to break the monopoly of Portuguese on Indian trade with the west.
The Portuguese had lost the confidence of Indian people and rulers because of their religious attitude and fraudulent trade practices. So, when other companies came, they were greeted by the rulers, even the Mughal emperor welcomed them.
The Surat in Gujarat had been the entry point of trade with the West. And English East India Company got the permission from Jahangir to start trade there in 1618 and soon they set up a factory there.
The trade with west had led to immense increase in Indian manufacturer's export like cotton textile, silk, spices etc. This had led to inflow of large quantities of bullion. It being the age of mercantilism no country was willing to part with bullion. So, alternative to finance Indian trade were being looked after by the European trading companies.
Also, they tried to develop and cultivate new articles for export from India like Calicoe, Saltpetre, Indigo etc. But even this was proving to be costly.
Aslo, their monopolistic ambition was not getting fulfilled because Indian traders had considerable share in foreign trade especially the trade with West Asia and South East Asia. The foreigners were on a lookout to eliminate them from competition.
And they began to harass Indian traders on Sea. But the Mughal empire which was powerful and resilient in 17th C, destroyed such ambitions of theirs. And again they took to the methods of prayers and petition before the Mughal monarch and gained concessions.
The Mughals agreed to their machination because they had tasted the fruits of trade expansion as it had increased their revenue resources. Also, Europeans were powerful at the Seas and they did not want to risk foreign trade of Indians.
And soon, after Mughal empire showed signs of weakness, we find European trading companies gaining territorial possessions, the revenue from which was used for financing the trade from India. And English & French took the lead and finally English became the real ruler of India in mid 18th century onwards.

Q.30. Discuss the emergence of composite culture during the period 16th to 18th centuries.

Ans. Culture is the essence of living. And composite culture means the mixing of cultures of different people. In India the ruler (Muslims) had come from outside and they had made it their own home. The Mughals came from Afghanistan and were of Turko-Mongo racial groups. Prior to them during Sultanate period various people of different social background had come to India and made it their home.
So, by their living in India, they got influenced by Indian culture. Also, Indian culture got influenced by the culture of their rulers. So, we find a different form emerging in India which was neither-Hindu nor Muslim-but a new one-the fusion of the two.
In architecture we find the emergence of Indo-Muslim architecture- using local materials and being built by indigenous actions and taking Indian motif to embellishing them.
In painting also we find the emergence of Mughal painting which was a mixture of the two great traditions of the Indian and Muslim paintings. The religious and exclusively floral painting of Muslims given way to the painting of humans and animals. The Secular themes-like Court Scenes, hunting scenes, etc come to predominate. There is emergence of portrait painting, banned by Muslim laws.
In Music, we find the emergence of Hindustani music which was a mixture of local and Muslim music. The themes being derived from both and also innovations of new ragas. Even today most prominent musicians of Hindustani music are Muslims. There was innovation and incorporation of new instruments.
In language, there emerged the Urdu, which derived from purely Arabic/Persian and local languages of India. And the ruling classes became well versed in this and they produced literacy works of great merit in this.
In the realm of religion, the Bhakti movement among the Hindu and the Sufi traditions among the Muslims, brought both these religions to understand each other on humanistic ground. There developed Syncretic religion in which people of both religions participated in each other's festivals and borrowed such rituals which were thought to be useful. Even Akbar's attempt at Din-e-IIahi- was at fusion of good elements of all religions in to one.
Thus, we see that policies followed by the Mughals, of not discriminating among the subjects on religious ground and the natural development of living together under similar conditions, made the culture of India a composite culture, the maintenance of which is sought by ll even today.

Q.31. Throw light on the Indo-Islamic architecture during the Khalji and Tughlaq period.

Ans. With the establishment of Turkish rule in northern India towards the beginning of thirteenth century, a process of interaction between two greatly enriched culture-Arbo-Persian culture of the Turks and existing traditional Indian culture began, which in the long run greatly enriched the existing Indian culture tradition in every field-art, architecture, music, painting etc.. In the field of architecture, the Turks brought with them the tradition of construction of buildings on method of "arch and dome". But they did not totally ignored the existing Indian tradition of "Slab and beam". Rather they used both the methods in their buildings.
By the time Khalji came into power, the Turkish empire in northern India was firmly established and so we find a lot of building activities during this period. The most famous Khalji monarch Alauddin khilji built his capital at `Siri' in Delhi which had a lot of buildings built by Indian architect and craftsmen. Unfortunately nothing survives at this place. But another construction of Alauddin, "Alai Darwaja" an entrance door to the Qutub-Minar clearly reveals the mastership achieved during the period. For the first time in India, the dome of this construction was constructed on correct scientific lines.
Tughlaq period, which marked the climax of Delhi Sultanate, saw great building activity. A great palace cum fortress complex, known as Tughlaqabad, was built by the first two Tughlaq rulers-Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq and Mohd. Bin Tughlaq. To give their buildings an impression of strength and solidity, Tughlaqs adopted a new architectural style of sloping walls. This style is known as "batter" and is found present in almost all the constructions of first two Tughlaq monarchs. Tughlaqs deliberately used both "arch and done" and "Lintel and beam" method in their constructions. This is found most markedly in the constructions of Feroz Shah. Hauz Khas and Firuz's new fort at Kotla have buildings built in the above mentioned two styles. To give a more pleasant skyline, Tughlaqs put up some of their buildings on high platforms. The example of this new trend is the tomb of Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq.
Thus, during the whole period of Delhi Sultanate, we find the example of positive development in the filed of architecture., In this development both Indian and Turkish tradition contributed in one way or the other. Basically, this development was the product of the interaction of two well established, enriched architectural systems.

Q.32. The same fire which melts butter hardens steel! Explain this phenomenon in the content of the frustration and stress resolution in personality development with examples.

Ans : The vulnerability of an individual on a stressful situation depends not merely on the nature of the stress. It is rather determined by the interaction of the magnitude and nature of stress  and the individual’s ability to  cope. In a frustration related situation, if an individual mobilizes all his resources to cope up effectively with the situation he may come out stronger to live another day. On the other hand, if instead of mobilzing his resources he acquires an attitude of helplessness he may succumb for all time to come.
People of weak personality who usually adopt an escapist tendency by resorting more to ego-defense reactions in face of frustrating situations end up developing mental disorder and deficiencies. A student who fails  may start blaming the teacher for partiality and parents for disturbing him during the exams. He ends up developing a rebellious attitude by saying that he will not study any more because his teachers are dishonest and the whole system is imperfect. Later this boy may end up as an unemployed and a destructive youth. On the other hand, if the boy says that he will work still harder in order to improve his performance may go on getting better results. Later he may end up as a bright and successful youth. So if one develops a soft and vulnerable personality he will melt like a butter and his personality may get deformed and degenerated. On the other hand if he develops a resilient and strong personality he many go on improving himself and may end up as a healthy and growing individual.
It has been found that people who resort more to ego defensive reactions will more likely fall in the ‘butter’ category while people who try to stand up to the frustrating situations by resorting to task-oriented reactions fall in the ‘steel’ category. Based on such similar criterion another distinction has also been made. It divides individuals into type-A  and type-B patterns. Type A people are those who are always tense, harsh, alert, hostile, ambitious etc. They don’t realistically appraise the stress situation and therefore overreact to them. They are more prone to coronary diseases. On the other hand, are the less coronary prone diseases people who are usually relaxed, calm, gentle, humorous, friendly, doesn’t mind delay etc. They respond to the stress provoking situation with calm and cool with realistically appraising appropriate responses. This, then, makes them more resilient and help them develop a healthy and growing personality.

Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Complete Syllabus of Class 10

Dynamic Test

Content Category

Related Searches

SST Set - 17 (Q.17 to 32) Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

past year papers

,

practice quizzes

,

Extra Questions

,

Free

,

ppt

,

Semester Notes

,

SST Set - 17 (Q.17 to 32) Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

video lectures

,

SST Set - 17 (Q.17 to 32) Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

Sample Paper

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

pdf

,

mock tests for examination

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Viva Questions

,

Summary

,

Exam

,

Objective type Questions

,

MCQs

,

study material

,

Important questions

;