Secondary Glaucomas MBBS Notes | EduRev

MBBS : Secondary Glaucomas MBBS Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


SECONDARY GLAUCOMAS 
1.  Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
3.  Neovascular glaucoma 
2.  Pigmentary glaucoma 
4.  Inflammatory glaucomas 
5.  Phacolytic glaucoma 
7.  Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome 
6.  Post-traumatic angle recession glaucoma 
8.  Glaucoma associated with iridoschisis 
Page 2


SECONDARY GLAUCOMAS 
1.  Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
3.  Neovascular glaucoma 
2.  Pigmentary glaucoma 
4.  Inflammatory glaucomas 
5.  Phacolytic glaucoma 
7.  Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome 
6.  Post-traumatic angle recession glaucoma 
8.  Glaucoma associated with iridoschisis 
Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
•  Prognosis less good than in POAG 
Pseudoexfoliative material 
Iris sphincter atrophy Gonioscopy 
•  Secondary trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Affects elderly, unilateral in 60% 
   Central disc with  
   peripheral band 
   Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
   - may extend anteriorly 
   (Sampaolesi line) 
On retroillumination 
Page 3


SECONDARY GLAUCOMAS 
1.  Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
3.  Neovascular glaucoma 
2.  Pigmentary glaucoma 
4.  Inflammatory glaucomas 
5.  Phacolytic glaucoma 
7.  Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome 
6.  Post-traumatic angle recession glaucoma 
8.  Glaucoma associated with iridoschisis 
Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
•  Prognosis less good than in POAG 
Pseudoexfoliative material 
Iris sphincter atrophy Gonioscopy 
•  Secondary trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Affects elderly, unilateral in 60% 
   Central disc with  
   peripheral band 
   Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
   - may extend anteriorly 
   (Sampaolesi line) 
On retroillumination 
Pigmentary glaucoma 
Krukenberg spindle and very  
deep anterior chamber 
Mid-peripheral iris 
atrophy 
•  Bilateral trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Typically affects young myopic males 
 Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
•  Increased incidence of lattice degeneration 
Fine pigment granules on 
anterior iris surface 
Page 4


SECONDARY GLAUCOMAS 
1.  Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
3.  Neovascular glaucoma 
2.  Pigmentary glaucoma 
4.  Inflammatory glaucomas 
5.  Phacolytic glaucoma 
7.  Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome 
6.  Post-traumatic angle recession glaucoma 
8.  Glaucoma associated with iridoschisis 
Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
•  Prognosis less good than in POAG 
Pseudoexfoliative material 
Iris sphincter atrophy Gonioscopy 
•  Secondary trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Affects elderly, unilateral in 60% 
   Central disc with  
   peripheral band 
   Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
   - may extend anteriorly 
   (Sampaolesi line) 
On retroillumination 
Pigmentary glaucoma 
Krukenberg spindle and very  
deep anterior chamber 
Mid-peripheral iris 
atrophy 
•  Bilateral trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Typically affects young myopic males 
 Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
•  Increased incidence of lattice degeneration 
Fine pigment granules on 
anterior iris surface 
Causes of neovascular glaucoma 
Ischaemic central retinal vein 
occlusion (most common) 
Long-standing diabetes (common) 
Central retinal artery  
occlusion  (uncommon) 
Carotid obstructive 
disease (uncommon) 
•  Common, secondary angle-closure glaucoma without pupil block 
•  Caused by rubeosis iridis associated with chronic, diffuse retinal ischaemia 
Page 5


SECONDARY GLAUCOMAS 
1.  Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
3.  Neovascular glaucoma 
2.  Pigmentary glaucoma 
4.  Inflammatory glaucomas 
5.  Phacolytic glaucoma 
7.  Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome 
6.  Post-traumatic angle recession glaucoma 
8.  Glaucoma associated with iridoschisis 
Pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 
•  Prognosis less good than in POAG 
Pseudoexfoliative material 
Iris sphincter atrophy Gonioscopy 
•  Secondary trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Affects elderly, unilateral in 60% 
   Central disc with  
   peripheral band 
   Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
   - may extend anteriorly 
   (Sampaolesi line) 
On retroillumination 
Pigmentary glaucoma 
Krukenberg spindle and very  
deep anterior chamber 
Mid-peripheral iris 
atrophy 
•  Bilateral trabecular block open-angle glaucoma 
•  Typically affects young myopic males 
 Trabecular hyperpigmentation 
•  Increased incidence of lattice degeneration 
Fine pigment granules on 
anterior iris surface 
Causes of neovascular glaucoma 
Ischaemic central retinal vein 
occlusion (most common) 
Long-standing diabetes (common) 
Central retinal artery  
occlusion  (uncommon) 
Carotid obstructive 
disease (uncommon) 
•  Common, secondary angle-closure glaucoma without pupil block 
•  Caused by rubeosis iridis associated with chronic, diffuse retinal ischaemia 
Signs of advanced 
 neovascular glaucoma 
Severely reduced visual 
acuity, congestion and pain 
Severe rubeosis iridis 
Distortion of pupil  
and ectropion uveae 
Synechial angle closure 
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Related Searches

Important questions

,

Objective type Questions

,

Secondary Glaucomas MBBS Notes | EduRev

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

past year papers

,

Secondary Glaucomas MBBS Notes | EduRev

,

Exam

,

study material

,

Summary

,

video lectures

,

Sample Paper

,

mock tests for examination

,

Free

,

Semester Notes

,

Extra Questions

,

practice quizzes

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

MCQs

,

Viva Questions

,

ppt

,

pdf

,

Secondary Glaucomas MBBS Notes | EduRev

;