Security: April 2021 Current Affair Notes | EduRev

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Current Affairs : Security: April 2021 Current Affair Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


	
4.	SECURITY	
4.1.	NAXAL	VIOLENCE		
Why in news? 
In an encounter between central 
paramilitary forces and Maoists in 
Chhattisgarh’s Sukma, 22 
personnel died. 
Naxalism in India 
• Naxalism is a form of armed 
insurgency against the State 
motivated by leftist/maoist 
ideologies and thus is also 
known as Left Wing extremism 
(LWE) or Maoism. 
• The Naxal insurgency in India 
originated in a 1967 uprising in 
Naxalbari, West Bengal by the 
Communist Party of India 
(Marxist). They are the group of 
people who believe in the 
political theory derived from the 
teachings of the Chinese political 
leader Mao Zedong. 
• The Naxalites claim to represent 
the most oppressed people in 
India, those who are often left 
untouched by India's 
development and bypassed by 
the electoral process. 
• The conflict is concentrated in 
the Eastern part of the country, 
particularly an area known as 
the Red Corridor spread across 
the states of Chhattisgarh, 
Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar and 
Andhra Pradesh. 
• Counterinsurgency operation by the Centre and affected states have helped to bring down Maoist sponsored 
violence. Covid-19 pandemic and the national lockdown also proved a massive blow for Maoists, as it cut 
critical supplies for many months. 
• As a result, LWE related incidents were down by 47 per cent between 2015 and 2020 as compared to incidents 
in the preceding six years from 2009 to 2014. 
• Presently, 90 districts in 11 states in the country are considered LWE affected.  
• Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand continue to account for 69.10% incidents of naxal violence across the country. 
Causes for Spread of Left Extremism 
Land Related 
Factors 
 
• Evasion of land ceiling laws.  
• Existence of special land tenures (enjoying exemptions under ceiling laws).  
• Encroachment and occupation of Government and Community lands (even the water-bodies) by 
powerful sections of society.  
• Lack of title to public land cultivated by the landless poor.  
• Poor implementation of laws prohibiting transfer of tribal land to non-tribals in the Fifth Schedule 
areas  
Page 2


	
4.	SECURITY	
4.1.	NAXAL	VIOLENCE		
Why in news? 
In an encounter between central 
paramilitary forces and Maoists in 
Chhattisgarh’s Sukma, 22 
personnel died. 
Naxalism in India 
• Naxalism is a form of armed 
insurgency against the State 
motivated by leftist/maoist 
ideologies and thus is also 
known as Left Wing extremism 
(LWE) or Maoism. 
• The Naxal insurgency in India 
originated in a 1967 uprising in 
Naxalbari, West Bengal by the 
Communist Party of India 
(Marxist). They are the group of 
people who believe in the 
political theory derived from the 
teachings of the Chinese political 
leader Mao Zedong. 
• The Naxalites claim to represent 
the most oppressed people in 
India, those who are often left 
untouched by India's 
development and bypassed by 
the electoral process. 
• The conflict is concentrated in 
the Eastern part of the country, 
particularly an area known as 
the Red Corridor spread across 
the states of Chhattisgarh, 
Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar and 
Andhra Pradesh. 
• Counterinsurgency operation by the Centre and affected states have helped to bring down Maoist sponsored 
violence. Covid-19 pandemic and the national lockdown also proved a massive blow for Maoists, as it cut 
critical supplies for many months. 
• As a result, LWE related incidents were down by 47 per cent between 2015 and 2020 as compared to incidents 
in the preceding six years from 2009 to 2014. 
• Presently, 90 districts in 11 states in the country are considered LWE affected.  
• Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand continue to account for 69.10% incidents of naxal violence across the country. 
Causes for Spread of Left Extremism 
Land Related 
Factors 
 
• Evasion of land ceiling laws.  
• Existence of special land tenures (enjoying exemptions under ceiling laws).  
• Encroachment and occupation of Government and Community lands (even the water-bodies) by 
powerful sections of society.  
• Lack of title to public land cultivated by the landless poor.  
• Poor implementation of laws prohibiting transfer of tribal land to non-tribals in the Fifth Schedule 
areas  
	
• Non-regularisation of traditional land rights. 
Governance 
Related Factors 
• Corruption and poor provision/non-provision of essential public services including primary health 
care and education.  
• Incompetent, ill-trained and poorly motivated public personnel 
• Misuse of powers by the police and violations of the norms of law.  
• Perversion of electoral politics and unsatisfactory working of local government institutions.  
• In 2006, Forest Rights Act was enacted. But Forest Bureaucracy continued its hostility towards it. 
Displacement 
and Forced 
Evictions 
• Eviction from lands traditionally used by tribals.  
• Displacements caused by mining, irrigation and power projects without adequate arrangements 
for rehabilitation.  
• Large scale land acquisition for ‘public purposes’ without appropriate compensation or 
rehabilitation. 
Livelihood 
Related Causes 
 
• Lack of food security  
• Disruption of traditional occupations and lack of alternative work opportunities.  
• Deprivation of traditional rights in common property resources. 
Important Initiatives for LWE affected states 
'Police' and 'Public order' being State subjects, the primary responsibility of meeting the challenge of Left Wing 
Extremism (LWE) lies with the State Governments. However, the MHA and other central ministries supplement 
the security efforts of the State Governments through various schemes such as: 
• National Policy and Action Plan implemented by MHA 
since 2015 is a multi-pronged strategy in the areas of 
security, development, ensuring rights & entitlement 
of local communities etc. to combat LWE. 
• Major Sub –Schemes under Scheme Modernization of 
Police Forces for 2017-21  
o Security Related Expenditure (SRE) Scheme 
(approved in 2017): aims at strengthening the 
capacity of the LWE affected States to fight against 
the LWE problem in an effective manner.  
o Special Central Assistance (SCA) for 30 most LWE 
affected districts to fill the critical gaps in Public 
infrastructure and Services, 
o Special Infrastructure Scheme (SIS) including 
construction of 250 Fortified Police Stations in LWE 
affected states.  
o Assistance to Central Agencies for LWE 
management Scheme  
o Civic Action Programme (CAP) to bridge the gaps 
between Security Forces and local people through 
personal interaction.  
o Media Plan Scheme to counter the Maoist 
propaganda. 
• Infrastructure development initiatives  
o Road Requirement Plan-I and II (RRP-I&II) is being implemented by Ministry of Road Transport & 
Highways, for improving road connectivity in affected districts. 
o LWE Mobile Tower Project and approval of Projects under Universal Service Obligation Fund (USOF) to 
improve mobile connectivity. 
o The National Technical Research Organization (NTRO) is assisting the Security Forces in anti-Naxal 
operations by providing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). 
• Skill Development related Schemes  
o ROSHNI is a special initiative under, Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana which 
envisages training and placement of rural poor youth from affected districts.  
o ITIs and Skill Development Centres have been established in LWE affected districts. 
 
SAMADHAN  
It is a strategy of MHA to frame short term and long-
term policies to tackle LWE. It includes:  
 
Page 3


	
4.	SECURITY	
4.1.	NAXAL	VIOLENCE		
Why in news? 
In an encounter between central 
paramilitary forces and Maoists in 
Chhattisgarh’s Sukma, 22 
personnel died. 
Naxalism in India 
• Naxalism is a form of armed 
insurgency against the State 
motivated by leftist/maoist 
ideologies and thus is also 
known as Left Wing extremism 
(LWE) or Maoism. 
• The Naxal insurgency in India 
originated in a 1967 uprising in 
Naxalbari, West Bengal by the 
Communist Party of India 
(Marxist). They are the group of 
people who believe in the 
political theory derived from the 
teachings of the Chinese political 
leader Mao Zedong. 
• The Naxalites claim to represent 
the most oppressed people in 
India, those who are often left 
untouched by India's 
development and bypassed by 
the electoral process. 
• The conflict is concentrated in 
the Eastern part of the country, 
particularly an area known as 
the Red Corridor spread across 
the states of Chhattisgarh, 
Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar and 
Andhra Pradesh. 
• Counterinsurgency operation by the Centre and affected states have helped to bring down Maoist sponsored 
violence. Covid-19 pandemic and the national lockdown also proved a massive blow for Maoists, as it cut 
critical supplies for many months. 
• As a result, LWE related incidents were down by 47 per cent between 2015 and 2020 as compared to incidents 
in the preceding six years from 2009 to 2014. 
• Presently, 90 districts in 11 states in the country are considered LWE affected.  
• Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand continue to account for 69.10% incidents of naxal violence across the country. 
Causes for Spread of Left Extremism 
Land Related 
Factors 
 
• Evasion of land ceiling laws.  
• Existence of special land tenures (enjoying exemptions under ceiling laws).  
• Encroachment and occupation of Government and Community lands (even the water-bodies) by 
powerful sections of society.  
• Lack of title to public land cultivated by the landless poor.  
• Poor implementation of laws prohibiting transfer of tribal land to non-tribals in the Fifth Schedule 
areas  
	
• Non-regularisation of traditional land rights. 
Governance 
Related Factors 
• Corruption and poor provision/non-provision of essential public services including primary health 
care and education.  
• Incompetent, ill-trained and poorly motivated public personnel 
• Misuse of powers by the police and violations of the norms of law.  
• Perversion of electoral politics and unsatisfactory working of local government institutions.  
• In 2006, Forest Rights Act was enacted. But Forest Bureaucracy continued its hostility towards it. 
Displacement 
and Forced 
Evictions 
• Eviction from lands traditionally used by tribals.  
• Displacements caused by mining, irrigation and power projects without adequate arrangements 
for rehabilitation.  
• Large scale land acquisition for ‘public purposes’ without appropriate compensation or 
rehabilitation. 
Livelihood 
Related Causes 
 
• Lack of food security  
• Disruption of traditional occupations and lack of alternative work opportunities.  
• Deprivation of traditional rights in common property resources. 
Important Initiatives for LWE affected states 
'Police' and 'Public order' being State subjects, the primary responsibility of meeting the challenge of Left Wing 
Extremism (LWE) lies with the State Governments. However, the MHA and other central ministries supplement 
the security efforts of the State Governments through various schemes such as: 
• National Policy and Action Plan implemented by MHA 
since 2015 is a multi-pronged strategy in the areas of 
security, development, ensuring rights & entitlement 
of local communities etc. to combat LWE. 
• Major Sub –Schemes under Scheme Modernization of 
Police Forces for 2017-21  
o Security Related Expenditure (SRE) Scheme 
(approved in 2017): aims at strengthening the 
capacity of the LWE affected States to fight against 
the LWE problem in an effective manner.  
o Special Central Assistance (SCA) for 30 most LWE 
affected districts to fill the critical gaps in Public 
infrastructure and Services, 
o Special Infrastructure Scheme (SIS) including 
construction of 250 Fortified Police Stations in LWE 
affected states.  
o Assistance to Central Agencies for LWE 
management Scheme  
o Civic Action Programme (CAP) to bridge the gaps 
between Security Forces and local people through 
personal interaction.  
o Media Plan Scheme to counter the Maoist 
propaganda. 
• Infrastructure development initiatives  
o Road Requirement Plan-I and II (RRP-I&II) is being implemented by Ministry of Road Transport & 
Highways, for improving road connectivity in affected districts. 
o LWE Mobile Tower Project and approval of Projects under Universal Service Obligation Fund (USOF) to 
improve mobile connectivity. 
o The National Technical Research Organization (NTRO) is assisting the Security Forces in anti-Naxal 
operations by providing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). 
• Skill Development related Schemes  
o ROSHNI is a special initiative under, Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana which 
envisages training and placement of rural poor youth from affected districts.  
o ITIs and Skill Development Centres have been established in LWE affected districts. 
 
SAMADHAN  
It is a strategy of MHA to frame short term and long-
term policies to tackle LWE. It includes:  
 
	
• Institutional measures  
o Black Panther combat force - A specialised anti-Naxal combat force for Chhattisgarh on the lines of 
Greyhounds unit in Telangana and Andhra Pradesh.  
o Bastariya Batallion – A newly formed batallion of CRPF with tribal youth from four highly naxal infested 
districts of Chhattisgarh along with adequate female representation.  
o Separate vertical in the NIA has been created for investigating cases. 
o Multi-disciplinary groups to check funding of Naxalites - MHA has formed multi-disciplinary groups with 
officers from central agencies, including from the IB, NIA, CBI, ED and DRI, and state police to choke the 
financial flow to Maoists. 
• Constructively engaging youth through education: Seeing the success of educational hub and a livelihood 
centre in Dantewada district, the government has now opened up livelihood centres, known as Livelihood 
Colleges, in all the districts.  
• Other measures:  
o More bank branches have been opened to ensure financial inclusion.  
o All India Radio stations in Bastar broadcast regional programmes to increase entertainment options.  
Prevailing issues in handling LWE  
• Negligence of established standard operating procedures at times leads to loss of valuable lives of security 
personnel.  
• Structural deficits and deficiencies such as putting IPS on deputations into almost every senior position in 
CRPF ignoring the decades of experience within the Force.  
• Sluggish Capacity building of police forces, for example – 
in Chattisgarh, there are about 10,000 vacancies in 
different ranks in state police and 23 sanctioned police 
stations have yet to be set up.  
• LWEs are well trained in guerilla warfare (fast-moving, 
small-scale actions).  
• Inefficient technology of mines detection: Present 
technology is unable to detect deep planted mines under 
the road.  
• Laundering of funds: Naxal leaders operating in Bihar and 
Jharkhand are laundering extorted money through 
acquiring movable and immovable assets. 
Way forward  
The two-pronged policy of proactive policing and holistic 
development is showing results and must be continued for significant results in the future. This includes:  
• Learning from best practices: Grey hounds in Andhra Pradesh have been successful in minimising Maoists 
activities to a large extent. Similarly, as Chhattisgarh police have experience in tackling Maoists in Bastar, they 
are now coordinating with the bordering States to strengthen intelligence and ground presence.  
• Eliminating the root cause of the problem that is leading to the alienation of tribals in this area. The focus 
should now be on building roads, increasing administrative and political access of the tribals, improving reach 
of government schemes etc.  
• Cooperative federalism: Centre and states should continue with their coordinated efforts where Centre 
should play a supportive role with state police forces taking the lead.  
• Forest Rights: Effective implementation of the Scheduled Tribes and other Traditional Forest Dwellers 
(Recognition of Rights) Act, 2006.  
• Financial empowerment: Introduce measures to encourage formation of ‘Self Help Groups’ (SHGs) to improve 
access to credit and marketing and empower the disadvantaged.  
• Infrastructure development: For implementing large infrastructure projects, particularly road networks that 
are strongly opposed by the extremists can be undertaken with the help of specialised Government agencies 
like the Border Roads Organisation instead of local contractors. 
 
Success story: Grey Hounds in Andhra Pradesh 
• In 1989, Andhra Pradesh set up Greyhounds, 
an elite force trained in jungle warfare and 
counter-Maoist strategy that carried out pin-
pointed operations with great success. 
• This was coupled with a surrender-and-
rehabilitation policy and setting up of the 
Remote and Interior Area Development 
Department to ensure that welfare schemes 
and infrastructure projects were tailored for 
Maoist areas. 
• Nearly 10 years after the formation of the 
Greyhounds, by 1999, the state police started 
getting an upper hand. With the occasional 
setbacks, by 2011, Andhra Pradesh finally 
managed to eliminate the Maoists. 
Page 4


	
4.	SECURITY	
4.1.	NAXAL	VIOLENCE		
Why in news? 
In an encounter between central 
paramilitary forces and Maoists in 
Chhattisgarh’s Sukma, 22 
personnel died. 
Naxalism in India 
• Naxalism is a form of armed 
insurgency against the State 
motivated by leftist/maoist 
ideologies and thus is also 
known as Left Wing extremism 
(LWE) or Maoism. 
• The Naxal insurgency in India 
originated in a 1967 uprising in 
Naxalbari, West Bengal by the 
Communist Party of India 
(Marxist). They are the group of 
people who believe in the 
political theory derived from the 
teachings of the Chinese political 
leader Mao Zedong. 
• The Naxalites claim to represent 
the most oppressed people in 
India, those who are often left 
untouched by India's 
development and bypassed by 
the electoral process. 
• The conflict is concentrated in 
the Eastern part of the country, 
particularly an area known as 
the Red Corridor spread across 
the states of Chhattisgarh, 
Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar and 
Andhra Pradesh. 
• Counterinsurgency operation by the Centre and affected states have helped to bring down Maoist sponsored 
violence. Covid-19 pandemic and the national lockdown also proved a massive blow for Maoists, as it cut 
critical supplies for many months. 
• As a result, LWE related incidents were down by 47 per cent between 2015 and 2020 as compared to incidents 
in the preceding six years from 2009 to 2014. 
• Presently, 90 districts in 11 states in the country are considered LWE affected.  
• Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand continue to account for 69.10% incidents of naxal violence across the country. 
Causes for Spread of Left Extremism 
Land Related 
Factors 
 
• Evasion of land ceiling laws.  
• Existence of special land tenures (enjoying exemptions under ceiling laws).  
• Encroachment and occupation of Government and Community lands (even the water-bodies) by 
powerful sections of society.  
• Lack of title to public land cultivated by the landless poor.  
• Poor implementation of laws prohibiting transfer of tribal land to non-tribals in the Fifth Schedule 
areas  
	
• Non-regularisation of traditional land rights. 
Governance 
Related Factors 
• Corruption and poor provision/non-provision of essential public services including primary health 
care and education.  
• Incompetent, ill-trained and poorly motivated public personnel 
• Misuse of powers by the police and violations of the norms of law.  
• Perversion of electoral politics and unsatisfactory working of local government institutions.  
• In 2006, Forest Rights Act was enacted. But Forest Bureaucracy continued its hostility towards it. 
Displacement 
and Forced 
Evictions 
• Eviction from lands traditionally used by tribals.  
• Displacements caused by mining, irrigation and power projects without adequate arrangements 
for rehabilitation.  
• Large scale land acquisition for ‘public purposes’ without appropriate compensation or 
rehabilitation. 
Livelihood 
Related Causes 
 
• Lack of food security  
• Disruption of traditional occupations and lack of alternative work opportunities.  
• Deprivation of traditional rights in common property resources. 
Important Initiatives for LWE affected states 
'Police' and 'Public order' being State subjects, the primary responsibility of meeting the challenge of Left Wing 
Extremism (LWE) lies with the State Governments. However, the MHA and other central ministries supplement 
the security efforts of the State Governments through various schemes such as: 
• National Policy and Action Plan implemented by MHA 
since 2015 is a multi-pronged strategy in the areas of 
security, development, ensuring rights & entitlement 
of local communities etc. to combat LWE. 
• Major Sub –Schemes under Scheme Modernization of 
Police Forces for 2017-21  
o Security Related Expenditure (SRE) Scheme 
(approved in 2017): aims at strengthening the 
capacity of the LWE affected States to fight against 
the LWE problem in an effective manner.  
o Special Central Assistance (SCA) for 30 most LWE 
affected districts to fill the critical gaps in Public 
infrastructure and Services, 
o Special Infrastructure Scheme (SIS) including 
construction of 250 Fortified Police Stations in LWE 
affected states.  
o Assistance to Central Agencies for LWE 
management Scheme  
o Civic Action Programme (CAP) to bridge the gaps 
between Security Forces and local people through 
personal interaction.  
o Media Plan Scheme to counter the Maoist 
propaganda. 
• Infrastructure development initiatives  
o Road Requirement Plan-I and II (RRP-I&II) is being implemented by Ministry of Road Transport & 
Highways, for improving road connectivity in affected districts. 
o LWE Mobile Tower Project and approval of Projects under Universal Service Obligation Fund (USOF) to 
improve mobile connectivity. 
o The National Technical Research Organization (NTRO) is assisting the Security Forces in anti-Naxal 
operations by providing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). 
• Skill Development related Schemes  
o ROSHNI is a special initiative under, Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana which 
envisages training and placement of rural poor youth from affected districts.  
o ITIs and Skill Development Centres have been established in LWE affected districts. 
 
SAMADHAN  
It is a strategy of MHA to frame short term and long-
term policies to tackle LWE. It includes:  
 
	
• Institutional measures  
o Black Panther combat force - A specialised anti-Naxal combat force for Chhattisgarh on the lines of 
Greyhounds unit in Telangana and Andhra Pradesh.  
o Bastariya Batallion – A newly formed batallion of CRPF with tribal youth from four highly naxal infested 
districts of Chhattisgarh along with adequate female representation.  
o Separate vertical in the NIA has been created for investigating cases. 
o Multi-disciplinary groups to check funding of Naxalites - MHA has formed multi-disciplinary groups with 
officers from central agencies, including from the IB, NIA, CBI, ED and DRI, and state police to choke the 
financial flow to Maoists. 
• Constructively engaging youth through education: Seeing the success of educational hub and a livelihood 
centre in Dantewada district, the government has now opened up livelihood centres, known as Livelihood 
Colleges, in all the districts.  
• Other measures:  
o More bank branches have been opened to ensure financial inclusion.  
o All India Radio stations in Bastar broadcast regional programmes to increase entertainment options.  
Prevailing issues in handling LWE  
• Negligence of established standard operating procedures at times leads to loss of valuable lives of security 
personnel.  
• Structural deficits and deficiencies such as putting IPS on deputations into almost every senior position in 
CRPF ignoring the decades of experience within the Force.  
• Sluggish Capacity building of police forces, for example – 
in Chattisgarh, there are about 10,000 vacancies in 
different ranks in state police and 23 sanctioned police 
stations have yet to be set up.  
• LWEs are well trained in guerilla warfare (fast-moving, 
small-scale actions).  
• Inefficient technology of mines detection: Present 
technology is unable to detect deep planted mines under 
the road.  
• Laundering of funds: Naxal leaders operating in Bihar and 
Jharkhand are laundering extorted money through 
acquiring movable and immovable assets. 
Way forward  
The two-pronged policy of proactive policing and holistic 
development is showing results and must be continued for significant results in the future. This includes:  
• Learning from best practices: Grey hounds in Andhra Pradesh have been successful in minimising Maoists 
activities to a large extent. Similarly, as Chhattisgarh police have experience in tackling Maoists in Bastar, they 
are now coordinating with the bordering States to strengthen intelligence and ground presence.  
• Eliminating the root cause of the problem that is leading to the alienation of tribals in this area. The focus 
should now be on building roads, increasing administrative and political access of the tribals, improving reach 
of government schemes etc.  
• Cooperative federalism: Centre and states should continue with their coordinated efforts where Centre 
should play a supportive role with state police forces taking the lead.  
• Forest Rights: Effective implementation of the Scheduled Tribes and other Traditional Forest Dwellers 
(Recognition of Rights) Act, 2006.  
• Financial empowerment: Introduce measures to encourage formation of ‘Self Help Groups’ (SHGs) to improve 
access to credit and marketing and empower the disadvantaged.  
• Infrastructure development: For implementing large infrastructure projects, particularly road networks that 
are strongly opposed by the extremists can be undertaken with the help of specialised Government agencies 
like the Border Roads Organisation instead of local contractors. 
 
Success story: Grey Hounds in Andhra Pradesh 
• In 1989, Andhra Pradesh set up Greyhounds, 
an elite force trained in jungle warfare and 
counter-Maoist strategy that carried out pin-
pointed operations with great success. 
• This was coupled with a surrender-and-
rehabilitation policy and setting up of the 
Remote and Interior Area Development 
Department to ensure that welfare schemes 
and infrastructure projects were tailored for 
Maoist areas. 
• Nearly 10 years after the formation of the 
Greyhounds, by 1999, the state police started 
getting an upper hand. With the occasional 
setbacks, by 2011, Andhra Pradesh finally 
managed to eliminate the Maoists. 
	
• Leveraging the use of technology: Such as micro or mini-UAVs or small drones, high-resolution PTZ cameras, 
GPS tracking, hand-held thermal imaging, radar and satellite imaging to minimize loss of lives of security 
personnel. Also, technologies like trackers in weapons and biometrics in smart guns must be used, to check 
the use of looted arms by the militants. 
• Choke funding: The nexus between illegal mining/forest contractors and transporters and extremists which 
provides the financial support for the extremist movement needs to be broken through establishment of 
special anti-extortion and anti-money laundering cell by State Police.  
• Role of the media in building trust and awareness generation: Support of media must be taken in order to 
change the sympathetic attitude of people towards the Maoists, to dispel the fear created by the Naxalites in 
the minds of people and instil confidence among them that the State is by their side. 
• Open the channels for political dialogues: With their domination being very weak and confidence low, it is 
the best time to have a peace dialogue with rebels. 
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
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