The Nationalist Movement in Indo China Class 10 Notes | EduRev

Class 10 : The Nationalist Movement in Indo China Class 10 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
The Nationalist Movement in Indo­China 
The French Domination 
Vietnamese Resistance to Domination 
Partition of Vietnam 
US Occupation 
Ho Chi Minh Trail 
A New Republic
Page 2


Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
The Nationalist Movement in Indo­China 
The French Domination 
Vietnamese Resistance to Domination 
Partition of Vietnam 
US Occupation 
Ho Chi Minh Trail 
A New Republic
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Early History 
Indo­China  comprises  the  modern  countries  of  Vietnam,  Laos  and  Cambodia.  Its 
early history  shows  many  different  groups  of  people  living in this  area under  the 
shadow  of  the  powerful empire  of  China. Even  when  an  independent  country  was 
established  in  what  is  now  northern  and  central  Vietnam,  its  rulers  continued  to 
maintain the Chinese system of government as well as Chinese culture. Vietnam was 
also linked to the maritime silk route that brought in goods, people and ideas. Other 
networks of trade connected it to the hinterlands where non­Vietnamese people such 
as the Khmer Cambodians lived.
Page 3


Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
The Nationalist Movement in Indo­China 
The French Domination 
Vietnamese Resistance to Domination 
Partition of Vietnam 
US Occupation 
Ho Chi Minh Trail 
A New Republic
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Early History 
Indo­China  comprises  the  modern  countries  of  Vietnam,  Laos  and  Cambodia.  Its 
early history  shows  many  different  groups  of  people  living in this  area under  the 
shadow  of  the  powerful empire  of  China. Even  when  an  independent  country  was 
established  in  what  is  now  northern  and  central  Vietnam,  its  rulers  continued  to 
maintain the Chinese system of government as well as Chinese culture. Vietnam was 
also linked to the maritime silk route that brought in goods, people and ideas. Other 
networks of trade connected it to the hinterlands where non­Vietnamese people such 
as the Khmer Cambodians lived.
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Colonial Domination and Resistance 
French troops landed in Vietnam in 1858 and by the mid­1880s they had established 
a  firm  grip  over  the  northern  region.  After  the  Franco­Chinese  war  the  French 
assumed control of Tonkin and Anaam and, in 1887, French Indo­China was formed. 
In the following decades the French sought to consolidate their position, and people 
in Vietnam began reflecting on the nature of the loss that Vietnam was suffering. 
Nationalist resistance developed out of this reflection. 
The colonisation of Vietnam by the French brought the people of  the country into 
conflict with the colonisers in all areas of life. The most visible form of French control 
was military and economic domination but the French also built a system that tried 
to reshape the culture of the Vietnamese. Nationalism in Vietnam emerged through 
the efforts of  different sections of  society to fight against the French and all they 
represented. 
Need of Colony for French 
Colonies were considered essential to supply natural resources and other essential 
goods.  Like  other  Western  nations,  France  also  thought it  was  the mission  of  the 
‘advanced’  European  countries  to  bring  the  benefits  of  civilisation  to  backward 
peoples. 
The  French  began  by  building  canals  and  draining  lands  in  the  Mekong  delta  to 
increase cultivation. The vast system of irrigation works – canals and earthworks – 
built mainly with forced labour, increased rice production and allowed the export of 
rice  to  the  international  market.  The  area  under  rice  cultivation  went  up  from 
274,000 hectares in 1873 to 1.1 million hectares in 1900 and 2.2 million in 1930. 
Vietnam exported two­thirds of its rice production and by 1931 had become the third 
largest exporter of rice in the world. 
This was followed by infrastructure projects to help transport goods for trade, move 
military garrisons and control the entire region. Construction of a trans­Indo­China 
rail network that would link the northern and southern parts of Vietnam and China 
was begun. This final link with Yunan in China was completed by 1910. The second 
line was also built, linking Vietnam to Siam (as Thailand was then called), via the 
Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh. By the 1920s, to ensure higher levels of profit for 
their  businesses,  French  business  interests  were  pressurising  the  government  in 
Vietnam to develop the infrastructure further. 
Should Colonies be Developed 
An eminent thinker, Paul Bernard, argued that the purpose of acquiring colonies was 
to  make  profits.  If  the  economy  was  developed  and  the  standard  of  living  of  the 
people  improved,  they  would  buy  more  goods.  The  market  would  consequently 
expand, leading to better profits for French business. Bernard suggested that there 
were  several  barriers to  economic  growth  in Vietnam:  high  population  levels,  low 
agricultural  productivity  and  extensive  indebtedness  amongst  the  peasants.  To 
reduce rural poverty and increase agricultural productivity it was necessary to carry
Page 4


Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
The Nationalist Movement in Indo­China 
The French Domination 
Vietnamese Resistance to Domination 
Partition of Vietnam 
US Occupation 
Ho Chi Minh Trail 
A New Republic
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Early History 
Indo­China  comprises  the  modern  countries  of  Vietnam,  Laos  and  Cambodia.  Its 
early history  shows  many  different  groups  of  people  living in this  area under  the 
shadow  of  the  powerful empire  of  China. Even  when  an  independent  country  was 
established  in  what  is  now  northern  and  central  Vietnam,  its  rulers  continued  to 
maintain the Chinese system of government as well as Chinese culture. Vietnam was 
also linked to the maritime silk route that brought in goods, people and ideas. Other 
networks of trade connected it to the hinterlands where non­Vietnamese people such 
as the Khmer Cambodians lived.
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Colonial Domination and Resistance 
French troops landed in Vietnam in 1858 and by the mid­1880s they had established 
a  firm  grip  over  the  northern  region.  After  the  Franco­Chinese  war  the  French 
assumed control of Tonkin and Anaam and, in 1887, French Indo­China was formed. 
In the following decades the French sought to consolidate their position, and people 
in Vietnam began reflecting on the nature of the loss that Vietnam was suffering. 
Nationalist resistance developed out of this reflection. 
The colonisation of Vietnam by the French brought the people of  the country into 
conflict with the colonisers in all areas of life. The most visible form of French control 
was military and economic domination but the French also built a system that tried 
to reshape the culture of the Vietnamese. Nationalism in Vietnam emerged through 
the efforts of  different sections of  society to fight against the French and all they 
represented. 
Need of Colony for French 
Colonies were considered essential to supply natural resources and other essential 
goods.  Like  other  Western  nations,  France  also  thought it  was  the mission  of  the 
‘advanced’  European  countries  to  bring  the  benefits  of  civilisation  to  backward 
peoples. 
The  French  began  by  building  canals  and  draining  lands  in  the  Mekong  delta  to 
increase cultivation. The vast system of irrigation works – canals and earthworks – 
built mainly with forced labour, increased rice production and allowed the export of 
rice  to  the  international  market.  The  area  under  rice  cultivation  went  up  from 
274,000 hectares in 1873 to 1.1 million hectares in 1900 and 2.2 million in 1930. 
Vietnam exported two­thirds of its rice production and by 1931 had become the third 
largest exporter of rice in the world. 
This was followed by infrastructure projects to help transport goods for trade, move 
military garrisons and control the entire region. Construction of a trans­Indo­China 
rail network that would link the northern and southern parts of Vietnam and China 
was begun. This final link with Yunan in China was completed by 1910. The second 
line was also built, linking Vietnam to Siam (as Thailand was then called), via the 
Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh. By the 1920s, to ensure higher levels of profit for 
their  businesses,  French  business  interests  were  pressurising  the  government  in 
Vietnam to develop the infrastructure further. 
Should Colonies be Developed 
An eminent thinker, Paul Bernard, argued that the purpose of acquiring colonies was 
to  make  profits.  If  the  economy  was  developed  and  the  standard  of  living  of  the 
people  improved,  they  would  buy  more  goods.  The  market  would  consequently 
expand, leading to better profits for French business. Bernard suggested that there 
were  several  barriers to  economic  growth  in Vietnam:  high  population  levels,  low 
agricultural  productivity  and  extensive  indebtedness  amongst  the  peasants.  To 
reduce rural poverty and increase agricultural productivity it was necessary to carry
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
out land reforms as the Japanese had done in the 1890s. However, this could not 
ensure sufficient employment. As the experience of Japan showed, industrialisation 
would be essential to create more jobs. 
The colonial economy in Vietnam was, however, primarily based on rice cultivation 
and rubber plantations owned by the French and a small Vietnamese elite. Rail and 
port facilities were set up to service this sector. Indentured Vietnamese labour was 
widely  used  in  the  rubber  plantations.  The  French  did  little  to  industrialise  the 
economy. In the rural areas landlordism spread and the standard of living declined. 
The Dilemma of Colonial Education 
French colonisation was not based only on economic exploitation. It was also driven 
by the idea of a ‘civilising mission’. Like the British in India, the French claimed that 
they were bringing modern civilization to the Vietnamese. They took for granted that 
Europe had developed the most advanced civilisation. So it became the duty of the 
Europeans  to  introduce  these  modern  ideas  to  the  colony  even  if  this  meant 
destroying  local  cultures,  religions  and  traditions,  because  these  were  seen  as 
outdated and prevented modern development. Education was seen as one way to 
civilise  the  ‘native’.  But  in  order  to  educate  them,  the  French  had  to  resolve  a 
dilemma. This dilemma was about the extent to which the Vietnamese needed to be 
educated. The  French needed  an  educated local  labour force  but they feared  that 
education  might  create  problems.  Once  educated,  the  Vietnamese  may  begin  to 
question  colonial  domination.  Moreover,  French  citizens  living  in  Vietnam  (called 
colons) began fearing that they might lose their jobs to the educated Vietnamese. So 
they  opposed  policies  that  would  give  the  Vietnamese  full  access  to  French 
education. 
Talking Modern 
The  French  were  faced  with  yet  another  problem  in  the  sphere  of  education:  the 
elites in Vietnam were powerfully influenced by Chinese culture. To consolidate their 
power,  the  French  had  to  counter  this  Chinese  influence.  So  they  systematically 
dismantled the traditional educational system and established French schools for the 
Vietnamese. But this was not easy. Chinese, the language used by the elites so far, 
had to be replaced. 
There were two broad opinions on this question. Some policymakers emphasised the 
need  to  use  the  French  language  as  the  medium  of  instruction.  By  learning  the 
language,  they  felt,  the  Vietnamese  would  be  introduced  to  the  culture  and 
civilisation  of  France.  This  would  help  create  an  ‘Asiatic  France  solidly  tied  to 
European France’. The educated people in Vietnam would respect French sentiments 
and ideals, see the superiority of  French culture, and work for the French. Others 
were opposed to French being the only medium of instruction. They suggested that 
Vietnamese be taught in lower classes and French in the higher classes. The few who 
learnt  French  and  acquired  French  culture  were  to  be  rewarded  with  French 
citizenship. 
However, only the Vietnamese elite – comprising a small fraction of the population – 
could enroll in the schools, and only a few among those admitted ultimately passed 
the  school­leaving examination.  This  was  largely  because  of  a  deliberate  policy  of 
failing students, particularly in the final year, so that they could not qualify for the
Page 5


Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
The Nationalist Movement in Indo­China 
The French Domination 
Vietnamese Resistance to Domination 
Partition of Vietnam 
US Occupation 
Ho Chi Minh Trail 
A New Republic
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Early History 
Indo­China  comprises  the  modern  countries  of  Vietnam,  Laos  and  Cambodia.  Its 
early history  shows  many  different  groups  of  people  living in this  area under  the 
shadow  of  the  powerful empire  of  China. Even  when  an  independent  country  was 
established  in  what  is  now  northern  and  central  Vietnam,  its  rulers  continued  to 
maintain the Chinese system of government as well as Chinese culture. Vietnam was 
also linked to the maritime silk route that brought in goods, people and ideas. Other 
networks of trade connected it to the hinterlands where non­Vietnamese people such 
as the Khmer Cambodians lived.
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
Colonial Domination and Resistance 
French troops landed in Vietnam in 1858 and by the mid­1880s they had established 
a  firm  grip  over  the  northern  region.  After  the  Franco­Chinese  war  the  French 
assumed control of Tonkin and Anaam and, in 1887, French Indo­China was formed. 
In the following decades the French sought to consolidate their position, and people 
in Vietnam began reflecting on the nature of the loss that Vietnam was suffering. 
Nationalist resistance developed out of this reflection. 
The colonisation of Vietnam by the French brought the people of  the country into 
conflict with the colonisers in all areas of life. The most visible form of French control 
was military and economic domination but the French also built a system that tried 
to reshape the culture of the Vietnamese. Nationalism in Vietnam emerged through 
the efforts of  different sections of  society to fight against the French and all they 
represented. 
Need of Colony for French 
Colonies were considered essential to supply natural resources and other essential 
goods.  Like  other  Western  nations,  France  also  thought it  was  the mission  of  the 
‘advanced’  European  countries  to  bring  the  benefits  of  civilisation  to  backward 
peoples. 
The  French  began  by  building  canals  and  draining  lands  in  the  Mekong  delta  to 
increase cultivation. The vast system of irrigation works – canals and earthworks – 
built mainly with forced labour, increased rice production and allowed the export of 
rice  to  the  international  market.  The  area  under  rice  cultivation  went  up  from 
274,000 hectares in 1873 to 1.1 million hectares in 1900 and 2.2 million in 1930. 
Vietnam exported two­thirds of its rice production and by 1931 had become the third 
largest exporter of rice in the world. 
This was followed by infrastructure projects to help transport goods for trade, move 
military garrisons and control the entire region. Construction of a trans­Indo­China 
rail network that would link the northern and southern parts of Vietnam and China 
was begun. This final link with Yunan in China was completed by 1910. The second 
line was also built, linking Vietnam to Siam (as Thailand was then called), via the 
Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh. By the 1920s, to ensure higher levels of profit for 
their  businesses,  French  business  interests  were  pressurising  the  government  in 
Vietnam to develop the infrastructure further. 
Should Colonies be Developed 
An eminent thinker, Paul Bernard, argued that the purpose of acquiring colonies was 
to  make  profits.  If  the  economy  was  developed  and  the  standard  of  living  of  the 
people  improved,  they  would  buy  more  goods.  The  market  would  consequently 
expand, leading to better profits for French business. Bernard suggested that there 
were  several  barriers to  economic  growth  in Vietnam:  high  population  levels,  low 
agricultural  productivity  and  extensive  indebtedness  amongst  the  peasants.  To 
reduce rural poverty and increase agricultural productivity it was necessary to carry
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
out land reforms as the Japanese had done in the 1890s. However, this could not 
ensure sufficient employment. As the experience of Japan showed, industrialisation 
would be essential to create more jobs. 
The colonial economy in Vietnam was, however, primarily based on rice cultivation 
and rubber plantations owned by the French and a small Vietnamese elite. Rail and 
port facilities were set up to service this sector. Indentured Vietnamese labour was 
widely  used  in  the  rubber  plantations.  The  French  did  little  to  industrialise  the 
economy. In the rural areas landlordism spread and the standard of living declined. 
The Dilemma of Colonial Education 
French colonisation was not based only on economic exploitation. It was also driven 
by the idea of a ‘civilising mission’. Like the British in India, the French claimed that 
they were bringing modern civilization to the Vietnamese. They took for granted that 
Europe had developed the most advanced civilisation. So it became the duty of the 
Europeans  to  introduce  these  modern  ideas  to  the  colony  even  if  this  meant 
destroying  local  cultures,  religions  and  traditions,  because  these  were  seen  as 
outdated and prevented modern development. Education was seen as one way to 
civilise  the  ‘native’.  But  in  order  to  educate  them,  the  French  had  to  resolve  a 
dilemma. This dilemma was about the extent to which the Vietnamese needed to be 
educated. The  French needed  an  educated local  labour force  but they feared  that 
education  might  create  problems.  Once  educated,  the  Vietnamese  may  begin  to 
question  colonial  domination.  Moreover,  French  citizens  living  in  Vietnam  (called 
colons) began fearing that they might lose their jobs to the educated Vietnamese. So 
they  opposed  policies  that  would  give  the  Vietnamese  full  access  to  French 
education. 
Talking Modern 
The  French  were  faced  with  yet  another  problem  in  the  sphere  of  education:  the 
elites in Vietnam were powerfully influenced by Chinese culture. To consolidate their 
power,  the  French  had  to  counter  this  Chinese  influence.  So  they  systematically 
dismantled the traditional educational system and established French schools for the 
Vietnamese. But this was not easy. Chinese, the language used by the elites so far, 
had to be replaced. 
There were two broad opinions on this question. Some policymakers emphasised the 
need  to  use  the  French  language  as  the  medium  of  instruction.  By  learning  the 
language,  they  felt,  the  Vietnamese  would  be  introduced  to  the  culture  and 
civilisation  of  France.  This  would  help  create  an  ‘Asiatic  France  solidly  tied  to 
European France’. The educated people in Vietnam would respect French sentiments 
and ideals, see the superiority of  French culture, and work for the French. Others 
were opposed to French being the only medium of instruction. They suggested that 
Vietnamese be taught in lower classes and French in the higher classes. The few who 
learnt  French  and  acquired  French  culture  were  to  be  rewarded  with  French 
citizenship. 
However, only the Vietnamese elite – comprising a small fraction of the population – 
could enroll in the schools, and only a few among those admitted ultimately passed 
the  school­leaving examination.  This  was  largely  because  of  a  deliberate  policy  of 
failing students, particularly in the final year, so that they could not qualify for the
Finish Line & Beyond 
www.excellup.com ©2009 send your queries to enquiry@excellup.com 
better­paid jobs. Usually, as many as two­thirds of the students failed. In 1925, in a 
population  of  17  million,  there  were  less  than  400  who  passed  the  examination. 
School  textbooks  glorified  the  French  and  justified  colonial  rule.  The  Vietnamese 
were represented as primitive and backward, capable of manual labour but not of 
intellectual  reflection; they could  work  in  the fields  but  not  rule themselves; they 
were ‘skilled copyists’ but not creative. 
Looking Modern 
The Tonkin Free School was started in 1907 to provide a Western style education. 
This education included classes in science, hygiene and French (these classes were 
held  in  the evening  and had  to  be paid for  separately).  The school’s  approach to 
what it means to be ‘modern’ is a good example of the thinking prevalent at that 
time.  It  was  not  enough  to  learn  science  and  Western  ideas:  to  be  modern  the 
Vietnamese  had  to  also  look  modern.  The  school  encouraged  the  adoption  of 
Western  styles  such  as  having  a  short  haircut.  For  the  Vietnamese  this  meant  a 
major break with their own identity since they traditionally kept long hair. 
Resistance in Schools 
Teachers and students did not blindly follow the curriculum. Sometimes there was 
open  opposition,  at  other  times  there  was  silent  resistance.  As  the  numbers  of 
Vietnamese  teachers  increased  in  the  lower  classes,  it  became  difficult  to  control 
what was actually taught. While teaching, Vietnamese teachers quietly modified the 
text and criticised what was stated. 
Elsewhere, students fought against the colonial government’s efforts to prevent the 
Vietnamese  from  qualifying  for  white­collar  jobs.  They  were  inspired  by  patriotic 
feelings  and  the  conviction  that  it  was  the  duty  of  the  educated  to  fight  for  the 
benefit  of  society.  This  brought  them  into  conflict  with  the  French  as  well  as  the 
traditional elite, since both saw their positions threatened. By the 1920s, students 
were  forming  various  political  parties,  such  as  the  Party  of  Young  Annan,  and 
publishing nationalist journals such as the Annanese Student. Schools thus became 
an important place for political and cultural battles. 
The  French  sought  to  strengthen  their  rule  in  Vietnam  through  the  control  of 
education. They tried to change the values, norms and perceptions of the people, to 
make them believe in the superiority of French civilisation and the inferiority of the 
Vietnamese. Vietnamese intellectuals, on the other hand, feared that Vietnam was 
losing  not  just  control  over its territory  but  its  very  identity:  its  own  culture  and 
customs  were  being  devalued  and  the  people  were  developing  a  master­slave 
mentality.  The  battle  against  French  colonial  education  became  part  of  the  larger 
battle against colonialism and for independence. 
Hygiene, Disease and Everyday Resistance 
When  the  French  set  about  creating  a  modern  Vietnam,  they  decided  to  rebuild 
Hanoi.  The  latest  ideas  about  architecture  and  modern  engineering  skills  were 
employed to build a new and ‘modern’ city. In 1903, the modern part of Hanoi was 
struck by bubonic plague. In many colonial countries, measures to control the spread
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Related Searches

Important questions

,

Semester Notes

,

The Nationalist Movement in Indo China Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

The Nationalist Movement in Indo China Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

video lectures

,

practice quizzes

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

pdf

,

Extra Questions

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Viva Questions

,

MCQs

,

mock tests for examination

,

The Nationalist Movement in Indo China Class 10 Notes | EduRev

,

Sample Paper

,

Exam

,

past year papers

,

Free

,

Objective type Questions

,

Summary

,

ppt

,

study material

;