The electron: Wave or Particle? Physics Notes | EduRev

Modern Physics for IIT JAM

Physics : The electron: Wave or Particle? Physics Notes | EduRev

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The electron: wave or particle?
Young’s aforementioned experiment in which a parallel beam of monochromatic light is passed through a pair of narrow parallel slits (Figure 5A) has an electron counterpart. In Young’s original experiment, the intensity of the light varies with direction after passing through the slits (Figure 5B). The intensity oscillates because of interference between the light waves emerging from the two slits, the rate of oscillation depending on the wavelength of the light and the separation of the slits. The oscillation creates a fringe pattern of alternating light and dark bands that is modulated by the diffraction pattern from each slit. If one of the slits is covered, the interference fringes disappear, and only the diffraction pattern (shown as a broken line in Figure 5B) is observed.

The electron: Wave or Particle? Physics Notes | EduRevFigure 5: (A) Monochromatic light incident on a pair of slits gives interference fringes (alternate light and dark bands) on a screen, (B) variation in the intensity of the light at the screen when both slits are open. With a single slit, there is no interference pattern; the intensity variation is shown by the broken line. As with Figure 4B, the same diagram would give the variation in the intensity of electrons in the corresponding electron experiment.

Young’s experiment can be repeated with electrons all with the same momentum. The screen in the optical experiment is replaced by a closely spaced grid of electron detectors. There are many devices for detecting electrons; the most common are scintillators. When an electron passes through a scintillating material, such as sodium iodide, the material produces a light flash which gives a voltage pulse that can be amplified and recorded. The pattern of electrons recorded by each detector is the same as that predicted for waves with wavelengths given by the de Broglie formula. Thus, the experiment provides conclusive evidence for the wave behaviour of electrons.
If the experiment is repeated with a very weak source of electrons so that only one electron passes through the slits, a single detector registers the arrival of an electron. This is a well-localized event characteristic of a particle. Each time the experiment is repeated, one electron passes through the slits and is detected. A graph plotted with detector position along one axis and the number of electrons along the other looks exactly like the oscillating interference pattern in Figure 5B. Thus, the intensity function in the figure is proportional to the probability of the electron moving in a particular direction after it has passed through the slits. Apart from its units, the function is identical to Ψ2, where Ψ is the solution of the time-independent Schrödinger equation for this particular experiment.
If one of the slits is covered, the fringe pattern disappears and is replaced by the diffraction pattern for a single slit. Thus, both slits are needed to produce the fringe pattern. However, if the electron is a particle, it seems reasonable to suppose that it passed through only one of the slits. The apparatus can be modified to ascertain which slit by placing a thin wire loop around each slit. When an electron passes through a loop, it generates a small electric signal, showing which slit it passed through. However, the interference fringe pattern then disappears, and the single-slit diffraction pattern returns. Since both slits are needed for the interference pattern to appear and since it is impossible to know which slit the electron passed through without destroying that pattern, one is forced to the conclusion that the electron goes through both slits at the same time.
In summary, the experiment shows both the wave and particle properties of the electron. The wave property predicts the probability of direction of travel before the electron is detected; on the other hand, the fact that the electron is detected in a particular place shows that it has particle properties. Therefore, the answer to the question whether the electron is a wave or a particle is that it is neither. It is an object exhibiting either wave or particle properties, depending on the type of measurement that is made on it. In other words, one cannot talk about the intrinsic properties of an electron; instead, one must consider the properties of the electron and measuring apparatus together.

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