Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-3) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

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CA CPT : Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-3) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

The document Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-3) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev is a part of the CA CPT Course Business Laws for CA Foundation.
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PERFORMANCE OF THE CONTRACT OF SALE (SECTIONS 31 – 44):

Definition of Delivery [section 2(2)]: Delivery means voluntary transfer of possession from one person to another.

Thus, if the possession is taken through unfair means, there is no delivery of the goods. Delivery of goods sold may be made by doing anything which the parties agree, shall be treated as delivery or putting the goods in the possession of the buyer or of any person authorised to hold them on his behalf.

Duties of seller and buyer (Section 31): It is the duty of the seller to deliver the goods and of the buyer to accept and pay for them, in accordance with the terms of the contract of sale.
Payment and delivery are concurrent conditions (Section 32): Unless otherwise agreed, delivery of the goods and payment of the price are concurrent conditions, that is to say, the seller shall be ready and willing to give possession of the goods to the buyer in exchange for the price, and the buyer shall be ready and willing to pay the price in exchange for possession of the goods.
Rules Regarding Delivery of goods (Section 33-41)
The Sale of good Act, 1930 prescribes the following rules of delivery of goods:
Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-3) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev
(i) Delivery (Section 33): Delivery of goods sold may be made by doing anything which the parties agree shall be treated as delivery or which has the effect of putting the goods in the possession of the buyer or of any person authorised to hold them on his behalf.
(ii) Effect of part delivery: A delivery of part of goods, in progress of the delivery of the whole has the same effect, for the purpose of passing the property in such goods, as a delivery of the whole; but a delivery of part of the goods, with an intention of severing it from the whole, does not operate as a delivery of the remainder. (Section 34)
Example: Certain goods lying at wharf were sold in a lot. The seller instructed the wharfinger to deliver them to the buyer who had paid for them and the buyer, thereafter, accepted them and took away part. Held, there was delivery of the whole.
(iii) Buyer to apply for delivery: Apart from any express contract, the seller of goods is not bound to deliver them until the buyer applies for delivery. (Section 35)
(iv) Place of delivery: Whether it is for the buyer to take possession of the goods or for the seller to send them to the buyer is a question depending in each case on the contract, express or implied, between the parties. Apart from any such contract, goods sold are to be delivered at the place at which they are at the time of the sale, and goods agreed to be sold are to be delivered at the place at which they are at the time of the agreement to sell or if not then in existence, at the place at which they are manufactured or produced. [Section 36(1)]
(v) Time of delivery: Where under the contract of sale the seller is bound to send the goods to the buyer, but no time for sending them is fixed, the seller is bound to send them within a reasonable time. [Section 36(2)]
(vi) Goods in possession of a third party: Where the goods at the time of sale are in possession of a third person, there is no delivery unless and until such third person acknowledges to the buyer that he holds the goods on his behalf. Provided that nothing in this section shall affect the operation of the issue or transfer of any document of title to goods. [Section 36(3)]
(vii) Time for tender of delivery: 
Demand or tender of delivery may be treated as ineffectual unless made at a reasonable hour. What is reasonable hour is a question of fact. [Section 36(4)].
(viii)Expenses for delivery:
The expenses of and incidental to putting the goods into a deliverable state must be borne by the seller in the absence of a contract to the contrary. [Section 36(5)].
(ix) Delivery of wrong quantity [Section 37]: 
Where the seller delivers to the buyer a quality of goods less than he contracted to sell, the buyer may reject them, but if the buyer accepts the goods so delivered he shall pay for them at the contract rate. [Sub-section (1)]
Where the seller delivers to the buyer a quantity of goods larger than he contracted to sell, the buyer may accept the goods included in the contract and reject the rest, or he may reject the whole. If the buyer accepts the whole of the goods so delivered, he shall pay for them at the contract rate. [Subsection (2)]
Where the seller delivers to the buyer the goods he contracted to sell mixed with goods of a different description not included in the contract, the buyer may accept the goods which are in accordance with the contract and reject, or may reject the whole. [Sub-section (3)]
The provisions of this section are subject to any usage of trade, special agreement or course of dealing between the parties. [Sub-section (4)]
Example: 
A agrees to sell 100 quintals of wheat to B at Rs. 1,000 per quintal. A delivers 1,100 quintals. B may reject the whole lot, or accept only 1,000 quintals and reject the rest or accept the whole lot and pay for them at the contract of sale.
(x) Instalment deliveries: Unless otherwise agreed, the buyer is not bound to accept delivery in instalments. The rights and liabilities in cases of delivery by instalments and payments thereon may be determined by the parties of contract. (Section 38)
(xi) Delivery to carrier: Subject to the terms of contract, the delivery of the goods to the carrier for transmission to the buyer, is prima facie deemed to be delivery to the buyer. [Section 39(1)]
(xii) Deterioration during transit: 
Where goods are delivered at a distant place, the liability for deterioration necessarily incidental to the course of transit will fall on the buyer, though the seller agrees to deliver at his own risk. (Section 40)

Example: P sold to Q a certain quantity of iron rods which was to be sent by proper vessel. It was rusted before it reached the buyer. The rust of the rod was so minimal and was not effecting the merchantable quality and the deterioration was not necessarily incidental to its transmission. It was held that Q was bound to accept the goods.
(xiii) Buyer’s right to examine the goods: Where goods are delivered to the buyer, who has not previously examined them, he is entitled to a reasonable opportunity of examining them in order to ascertain whether they are in conformity with the contract. Unless otherwise agreed, the seller is bound, on request, to afford the buyer a reasonable opportunity of examining the goods. (Section 41)
Rule related to Acceptance of Delivery of Goods (Section 42):

The buyer is deemed to have accepted the goods when he intimates to the seller that he has accepted them, or when the goods have been delivered to him and he does any act in relation to them which is inconsistent with the ownership of the seller, or when, after the lapse of a reasonable time, he retains the goods without intimating to the seller that he has rejected them.
Analysis:
Acceptance is deemed to take place when the buyer
(a) intimates to the seller that he had accepted the goods; or
(b) does any act to the goods, which is inconsistent with the ownership of the seller; or
(c) retains the goods after the lapse of a reasonable time, without intimating to the seller that he has rejected them.

Buyer not bound to return rejected goods (Section 43): Unless otherwise agreed, where goods are delivered to the buyer and he refuses to accept them, having the right so to do, he is not bound to return them to the seller, but it is suffcient if he intimates to the seller that he refuses to accept them.
Liability of buyer for neglecting or refusing delivery of goods (Section 44): When the seller is ready and willing to deliver the goods and requests the buyer to take delivery, and the buyer does not within a reasonable time after such request take delivery of the goods, he is liable to the seller for any loss occasioned by his neglect or refusal to take delivery and also for a reasonable charge for the care and custody of the goods. Provided further that nothing in this section shall affect the rights of the seller where the neglect or refusal of the buyer to take delivery amounts to a repudiation of the contract.

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