Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

Business Laws for CA Foundation

Created by: Sushil Kumar

CA CPT : Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

The document Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev is a part of the CA CPT Course Business Laws for CA Foundation.
All you need of CA CPT at this link: CA CPT

RISK PRIMA FACIE PASSES WITH PROPERTY (SECTIONS 26):

According to section 26, unless otherwise agreed, the goods remain at the seller’s risk until the property therein is transferred to the buyer, but when the property therein is transferred to the buyer, the goods are at the buyer’s risk whether delivery has been made or not:
Provided that, where delivery has been delayed through the fault of either buyer or seller, the goods are at the risk of the party in fault as regards any loss which might not have occurred but for such fault.

Provided also that nothing in this section shall affect the duties or liabilities of either seller or buyer as bailee of the goods of the other party.

Analysis:
The general rule is, “unless otherwise agreed, the goods remain at the seller’s risk until the property therein is transferred to the buyer, but when the property therein is transferred to the buyer, the goods are at the buyer’s risk whether delivery has been made or not”.

However, Section 26 also lays down an exception to the rule that ‘risk follows ownership.’ It provides that where delivery of the goods has been delayed through the fault of either buyer or seller, the goods are at the risk of the party in fault as regards any loss which might not have occurred but for such fault.

Thus in ordinary circumstances, risk is borne by the buyer only when the property in the goods passes over to him. However, the parties may by special agreement stipulate that ‘risk’ will pass sometime after or before the ‘property’ has passed.

Risk prima facie passes with ownership: The owner of goods must bear the loss or damage of goods unless otherwise is agreed to. Under Section 26 of the Sale of Goods Act, unless otherwise agreed, the goods remain at the seller’s risk until property therein has passed to the buyer. After that event they are at the buyer’s risk, whether delivery has been made or not.

Example: A bids for an antique painting at a sale by auction. After the bid, when the auctioneer struck his hammer to signify acceptance of the bid, he hit the antique which gets damaged. The loss will have to be borne by the seller, because the ownership of goods has not yet passed from the seller to the buyer.

The aforesaid rule is, however, subject to two qualifications:
(i) If delivery has been delayed by the fault of the seller or the buyer, the goods shall be at the risk of the party in default, as regards loss which might not have arisen but for the default.
(ii) The duties and liabilities of the seller or the buyer as bailee of goods for the other party remain unaffected even when the risk has passed generally.

Example: A contracted to sell 100 bales of cotton to B to be delivered in February. B took the delivery of the part of the cotton but made a default in accepting the remaining bales. Consequently the cotton becomes unfit for use. The loss will have to be borne by the buyer. It should, however, be remembered that the general rule shall not affect the duties or liabilities of either seller or buyer as a bailee of goods for the other, even when the risk has passed.

As noted above, the risk (i.e., the liability to bear the loss in case property is destroyed, damaged or deteriorated) passes with ownership. The parties may, however, agree to the contrary. For instance, the parties may agree that risk will pass sometime after or before the property has passed from the seller to the buyer.

TRANSFER OF TITLE (SECTIONS 27 – 30):

Sale by person not the owner (Section 27): Subject to the provisions of this Act and of any other law for the time being in force, where goods are sold by a person who is not the owner thereof and who does not sell them under the authority or with the consent of the owner, the buyer acquires no better title to the goods than the seller had, unless the owner of the goods is by his conduct precluded from denying the seller’s authority to sell.
Provided that, where a mercantile agent is, with the consent of the owner, in possession of the goods or of a document of title to the goods, any sale made by him, when acting in the ordinary course of business of a mercantile agent, shall be as valid as if he were expressly authorised by the owner of the goods to make the same; provided that the buyer acts in good faith and has not at the time of the contract of sale notice that the seller has no authority to sell.
Analysis:
In general the seller sells only such goods of which he is the absolute owner. But sometimes a person may sell goods of which he is not the owner, then the question arises as to what is the position of the buyer who has bought the goods by paying price. The general rule regarding the transfer of title is that the seller cannot transfer to the buyer of goods a better title than he himself has. If the seller is not the owner of goods, then the buyer also will not become the owner i.e. the title of the buyer shall be the same as that of the seller. This rule is expressed in the Latin maxim “Nemo dat quod non habet” which means that no one can give what he has not got.

Example 1:  If A sells some stolen goods to B, who buys them in good faith, B will get no title to that and the true owner has a right to get back his goods from B.

Example 2: P, the hirer of vehicle under a hire purchase agreement, sells them to Q. Q, though a bona fide purchaser, does not acquire the ownership in the vehicle. At the most he acquires the same right as that of the hirer.

If this rule is enforced rigidly then the innocent buyers may be put to loss in many cases. Therefore, to protect the interests of innocent buyers, a number of exceptions have been provided to this rule.

Exceptions: In the following cases, a non-owner can convey better title to the bona fide purchaser of goods for value.
(1) Sale by a Mercantile Agent: A sale made by a mercantile agent of the goods for document of title to goods would pass a good title to the buyer in the following circumstances; namely;
(a) If he was in possession of the goods or documents with the consent of the owner;
(b) If the sale was made by him when acting in the ordinary course of business as a mercantile agent; and
(c) If the buyer had acted in good faith and has at the time of the contract of sale, no notice of the fact that the seller had no authority to sell (Proviso to Section 27).
(2) Sale by one of the joint owners (Section 28): If one of several joint owners of goods has the sole possession of them by permission of the co-owners, the property in the goods is transferred to any person who buys them of such joint owner in good faith and has not at the time of the contract of sale notice that the seller has no authority to sell. Example: A, B, and C are three brothers and joint owners of a T.V and VCR and with the consent of B and C, the VCR was kept in possession of A. A sells the T.V and VCR to P who buys it in good faith and without notice that A had no authority to sell. P gets a good title to VCR and TV.
(3) Sale by a person in possession under voidable contract: A buyer would acquire a good title to the goods sold to him by a seller who had obtained possession of the goods under a contract voidable on the ground of coercion, fraud, misrepresentation or undue inuence provided that the contract had not been rescinded until the time of the sale (Section 29).

Example: X fraudulently obtains a diamond ring from Y. This contract is voidable at the option of Y. But before the contract could be terminated, X sells the ring to Z, an innocent purchaser. Z gets the good title and Y cannot recover the ring from Z even if the contract is subsequently set aside.

(4) Sale by one who has already sold the goods but continues in possession thereof: If a person has sold goods but continues to be in possession of them or of the documents of title to them, he may sell them to a third person, and if such person obtains the delivery thereof in good faith and without notice of the previous sale, he would have good title to them, although the property in the goods had passed to the first buyer earlier. A pledge or other disposition of the goods or documents of title by the seller in possession are equally valid [Section 30(1)].

Example: During ICL matches, P buys a TV set from R. R agrees to deliver the same to P after some days. In meanwhile R sells the same to S, at a higher price, who buys in good faith and without knowledge about the previous sale. S gets a good title.
(5) Sale by buyer obtaining possession before the property in the goods has vested in him: Where a buyer with the consent of the seller obtains possession of the goods before the property in them has passed to him, he may sell, pledge or otherwise dispose of the goods to a third person, and if such person obtains delivery of the goods in good faith and without notice of the lien or other right of the original seller in respect of the goods, he would get a good title to them [Section 30(2)].

However, a person in possession of goods under a ‘hire-purchase’ agreement which gives him only an option to buy is not covered within the section unless it amounts to a sale.

Example: A took a car from B on this condition that A would pay a monthly installment of Rs. 5,000 as hire charges with an option to purchase it by payment of Rs. 1,00,000 in 24 installments.

After the payment of few installments, A sold the car to C. B can recover the car from C since A had neither bought the car, nor had agreed to buy the car. He had only an option to buy the car.
(6) Effect of Estoppel: Where the owner is estopped by the conduct from denying the seller’s authority to sell, the transferee will get a good title as against the true owner. But before a good title by estoppel can be made, it must be shown that the true owner had actively suffered or held out the other person in question as the true owner or as a person authorized to sell the goods.

Example: ‘A’ said to ‘B’, a buyer, in the presence of ‘C’ that he (A) is the owner of the horse.  But ‘C’ remained silent though the horse belonged to him. ‘B’ bought the horse from ‘A’.  Here the buyer (B) will get a valid title to the horse even though the seller (A) had not title to the horse.  In this case, ‘C’, by his own conduct, is prevented from denying ‘A’s authority to sell the horse.
(7) Sale by an unpaid seller: Where an unpaid seller who had exercised his right of lien or stoppage in transit resells the goods, the buyer acquires a good title to the goods as against the original buyer [Section 54 (3)].
(8) Sale under the provisions of other Acts:

(i) Sale by an Official Receiver or Liquidator of the Company will give the purchaser a valid title.
(ii) Purchase of goods from a finder of goods will get a valid title under circumstances [Section 169 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872]
(iii) A s ale by pawnee can convey a good title to the buyer [Section 176 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872]

Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Complete Syllabus of CA CPT

Dynamic Test

Content Category

Related Searches

pdf

,

Extra Questions

,

Important questions

,

mock tests for examination

,

ppt

,

Summary

,

study material

,

1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

,

Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act

,

Exam

,

MCQs

,

1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

,

Viva Questions

,

Semester Notes

,

video lectures

,

Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act

,

past year papers

,

Objective type Questions

,

Transfer of Ownership and Delivery of Goods (Part-2) - The Sale of Goods Act

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Sample Paper

,

practice quizzes

,

Free

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

1930 CA CPT Notes | EduRev

;