Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRev

Principles and Practice of Accounting

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CA CPT : Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRev

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Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRev
5.1 Cash Book - A Subsidiary Book and a Principal Book
Cash transactions are straightaway recorded in the Cash Book and on the basis of such a record, ledger accounts are prepared. Therefore, the Cash Book is a subsidiary book. But the Cash Book itself serves as the cash account and the bank account; the balances are entered in the trial balance directly. The Cash Book, therefore, is part of the ledger also. Hence, it has also to be treated as the principal book. The Cash Book is thus both a subsidiary book and a principal book.

5.2 Kinds of Cash Book
The main Cash Book may be of the three types:
(i) Simple Cash Book;
(ii) Two-column Cash Book;
(iii) Three-column Cash Book.
In addition to the main Cash Book, firms also generally maintain a petty cash book but that is purely a subsidiary book.
Simple Cash Book
Such a cash book appears like an ordinary account, with one amount column on each side. The left-hand side records receipts of cash and the right-hand side the payments.
Balancing of the Cash Book: The cash book is balanced like other accounts. The total of receipts column is always greater than total of payments column. The difference is written on the credit side as 'By balance c/d'. The totals are then entered in the two columns opposite one another and then on the debit side the balance is written as "To Balance b/d", to show cash balance in hand in the beginning of next period.

ILLUSTRATION 1
Enter the following transactions in a Simple Cash Book:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevSolution:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevNote: One can see the following:
(i) In the simple cash book only the cash receipts and cash payments are recorded.
(ii) The total of debit side is always greater than the total of credit side since the payment cannot exceed the available cash.
(iii) The simple cash book is like an ordinary account.

Double-Column Cash Book
If along with columns for amounts to record cash receipts and cash payments another column is added on each side to record the cash discount allowed or the discount received, or a column on the debit side showing bank receipts and another column on the credit side showing payments through bank. It is a double-column cash book.
Cash discount is an allowance which often accompanies cash payments. For example, if a customer owes ' 500 but is promised that 2% will be deducted if payment is made within a certain period, the customer can clear his account by paying promptly ' 490. Cash received will be ' 490 and ' 10 will be the discount for the firm receiving the payment discount is a loss; for the person making the payment it is a gain.
Since cash discount is allowed only if cash is paid, it is convenient to add a column for discount allowed on the receipt side of the cash book and a column for discount received on the payment side of the cash book. In the cash column on the debit side, actual cash received is entered; the amount of the discount allowed, if any, to the customer concerned is entered in the discount column.
Similarly, actual cash paid is entered in the cash column on the payments side and discount received in the discount column. Also the bank column on the debit side records all receipts through bank and the same column on the credit side shows payment through bank.
Balancing: It should be noted that the discount columns are not balanced. They are merely totalled. The total of the discount column on the receipts side shows total discount allowed to customers and is debited to the Discount Account. The total of the column on the payments side shows total discount received and is credited to the Discount Account. The Cash columns are balanced, as already shown. The bank columns are also balanced and the balancing figure is called bank balance. Thus a double column cash book should have two columns on each side comprising of either cash and discount transaction or cash and bank transactions.

ILLUSTRATION 2
Ganesh commenced business on 1st April, 2017 with ' 2,000 as capital. He had the following cash transactions in the month of April 2017:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevMake out the two-column Cash Book (Cash and discount column) for the month of April, 2017.
Solution:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevTo summarise:
(i) the discount columns in the cash book are totalled;
(ii) they are not balanced; and
(iii) their totals are entered in the discount received/paid account in the ledger.
Note: The person who pays, is credited by both the cash paid by him and the discount allowed to him. Similarly, the person to whom payment is made, is debited with both the amount paid and the discount allowed by him.
Three-Column Cash Book
A firm normally keeps the bulk of its funds at a bank; money can be deposited and withdrawn at will if it is current account. Probably payments into and out of the bank are more numerous than strict cash transactions. There is only a little difference between cash in hand and money at bank. Therefore, it is very convenient if, on each side in the cash book, another column is added to record cash deposited at bank (on the receipt side of the cash book) and payments out of the bank (on the payment side of the cash book).
For writing up the three-column cash book the under mentioned points should be noted:
1. While commencing a new business, the amount is written in the cash column if cash is introduced and in the bank column if it is directly put into the bank with the description "To Capital Account". If a new cash book is being started for an existing business, the opening balances are written as : "To Balance b/d"
2. All receipts are written on the receipts side, cash in the cash column and cheques in the bank column. If any discount is allowed to the party paying the amount, the discount is entered in the discount column. In the particulars column the name of the account in respect of which payment has been received is written.
3. All payments are written on the payments side, cash payment in the cash column and payments by cheques in the bank column. If some discount has been received from the party receiving the payment, it is entered in the discount column.
4. Contra Entries: Often cash is withdrawn from bank for use in the office. In such a case the amount is entered in the bank column on the payments side and also in the cash column on the receipts side. In the reverse case of cash being sent to the bank, the amount is recorded in the bank column on the receipts side and in cash column on payment side. Against such entries, the letter "C" should be written in the LF. column, to indicate that these are contra transaction and no further posting is required for them.
Note: If initially cheques received are entered in the cash column and then sent to the bank, the entry is as if cash has been sent to the bank.
While recording contra entries, the basic but important rules should be followed -
(a) The Receiver Dr.
The Giver   Cr.
(b) All what comes in Dr.
All what goes out Cr.
e.g. where a Cash Book with separate columns for Bank Account is maintained.
(a) If cash is deposited in Bank Account, the Bank will be the Receiver, hence it will be Debited and as the cash is going out, cash will be credited.
(b) If cash is withdrawn from the Bank Account, the Bank will be the Giver, hence it will be Credited and, as the cash is coming in, cash will be Debited.
5. If some cheque sent to the bank is dishonoured, i.e., the bank is not able to collect the amount, it is entered in the bank column on the credit side with the name of the related party in the particulars column.
6. If some cheque issued by the firm is not paid on presentation, it is entered in the Bank column on the debit side with the name of the party to whom the cheque was given.
7. In a rare case, a cheque received may be given to some other party, i.e., endorsed. On receipt, it must have been entered in the bank column on the debit side; on endorsement the amount will be written in the bank column on the credit side.
The advantages of such type of Cash Book are that -
(a) the Cash Account and the Bank Account are prepared simultaneously, therefore the double entry is completed in the Cash Book itself. Thus the contra entries can be easily cross-checked in Cash column in one side and the Bank column in the other side of the Cash Book. Also the chances of error are reduced.
(b) the information regarding Cash in Hand and the Bank Balance can be obtained very easily and quickly as there is no need to prepare Ledger of the Bank Account.
In case of maintaining more than one Bank Account, separate column can be add for each Bank Account. Transactions between these two or more Bank Accounts can be recorded and tallied with a much less effort.
Suppose, there are two Bank Accounts namely PNB Current Account and SBI-Cash Credit Account. Now, if a cheque is deposited of PNB to SBI Account, the receiver - i.e., SBI Account will be debited and the giver i.e. the PNB Account shall be credited.
Balancing: The discount columns are totalled but not balanced. The cash columns are balanced exactly in the same manner as indicated for the simple cash book. The process is similar for balancing the bank columns also. It is possible, however, that the bank may allow the firm to withdraw more than the amount deposited i.e., to have an overdraft, In such a case, the total of the bank column on the credit side is bigger than the one on the debit side. The difference is written on the debit side as "To Balance c/d." Then the totals are written on the two sides opposite one another, the balance is then entered on the credit side as "By Balance b/d"
However, the usual case is that payments into the bank will exceed the withdrawals or payments out of the bank. Then the bank columns are balanced just like the cash columns.

ILLUSTRATION 3
Enter the following transactions in Cash Book with Discount and Bank Columns. Cheques are first treated as cash receipt.
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevSolution:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRev
5.3 Posting the Cash Book Entries
Students would have seen that the cash columns in the cash book is actually the cash account and the bank column is actually bank account. Also, the discount columns are memorandum columns, meant only to provide information about the total discount allowed and total discount received.
The debit side columns for cash and bank indicate receipts. Therefore, the amounts debited in the cash book should be put to the credit of the account in respect of which cash or cheque has been received. For instance, in the cash book given above we see that '175 have been received for sale of goods. For posting, the amount is credited to the Sales Account as "By Cash '175." We also see M/s. Warsi have paid '450 and also they have been allowed ' 35 as discount; thus they have discharged a debt of '485. In the account of M/s. Warsi, the posting is on the credit side as
By Cash ₹ 450
By Discount ₹ 35
or
as:By Sundries ₹ 485
All payments are recorded on the credit side. The particulars columns show on what account payments have been made. In the ledger accounts concerned the amount is put on the debit side. For example, the cash book shows that a cheque for ₹ 330 has been issued to M/s. Ratan & Co. and also that they have allowed a discount of ₹ 20; thus an obligation of ₹ 350 has been met. In the account of M/s. Ratan & Co. the posting is:
To Bank ₹ 330
To Discount ₹ 20
Or
To Sundries ₹ 350
The rule thus develops: From the debit side of the cash book credit the various accounts with their respective amounts (including any discount that may have been allowed); from the credit side of cash book the posting will be to the debit of the accounts mentioned in the particular column with their respective amounts (including the discount which may have been received).
As has been shown already, the total of the discount columns on the debit side is debited to the discount account; the total of the column on the credit side is credited to the discount account. From the cash book given on the previous page ₹ 35 is debited and ₹ 20 be credited to the discount account.

5.4 Petty Cash Book
In a business house a number of small payments, such as for telegrams, taxi fare, cartage, etc., have to be made. If all these payments are recorded in the cash book, it will become unnecessarily heavy. Also, the main cashier will be overburdened with work. Therefore, it is usual for firms to appoint a person as 'Petty Cashier' and to entrust the task of making small payments say below ₹ 200, to him. Of course he will be reimbursed for the payments made. Later, on an analysis, the respective account may be debited.
Imprest System of Petty Cash
It is convenient to entrust a definite sum of money to the petty cashier in the beginning of a period and to reimburse him for payments made at the end of the period. Thus, he will have again the fixed amount in the beginning of the new period. Such a system is known as the imprest system of petty cash.
The system is very useful specially if an analytical Petty Cash Book is used. The book has one column to record receipt of cash (which is only from the main cashier) and other columns to record payments of various types. The total of the various columns show why payments have been made and then the relevant accounts can be debited.
(i) The amount fixed for petty cash should be sufficient for the likely small payments for a relatively short period, say for a week or a fortnight.
(ii) The reimbursement should be made only when petty cashier prepares a statement showing total payments supported by vouchers, i.e., documentary evidence and should be limited to the amount of actual disbursements.
(iii) The vouchers should be filed in order.
(iv) No payment should be made without proper authorization. Also, payments above a certain specified limit should be made only by the main cashier.
(v) The petty cashier should not be allowed to receive any cash except for reimbursement.
In the petty cash book the extreme left-hand column records receipts of cash. The money column towards the right hand shows total payments for various purposes; a column is usually provided for sundries to record infrequent payments. The sundries column is analysed. At the end of the week or the fortnight the petty cash book is balanced. The method of balancing is the same as for the simple cash book.

ILLUSTRATION 4
Prepare a Petty Cash Book on the imprest System from the following:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevSolution:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRev
Advantages of Petty Cash Book
There are mainly three advantages:
(i) Saving of time of the chief cashier;
(ii) Saving in labour in writing up the cash book and posting into the ledger; and
(iii) Control over small payments.

Posting the Petty Cash Book
In the ledger, a petty cash account is maintained; when an amount is given to the petty cashier, the petty cash account is debited. Each week or forthnight, the total of the payments made is credited to this account. The petty cash account will then show the balance in the hand of the cashier; on demand he should be able to produce it for counting. At the end of the year, the balance is shown in the balance sheet as part of cash balance.
Of course, the payments must be debited to their respective amounts as shown by the petty cash book. For this two methods may be used:
(i) From the petty cash book the total of the various columns may be directly debited to the concerned accounts; or
(ii) A journal entry may first be prepared on the basis of the petty cash book, debiting the accounts shown by the various analysis columns, and crediting the total of the payment of the petty cash accounts.
For Illustration 4 the journal entry and relevant accounts are as follows:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevPetty Cash Account
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRev
5.5 Entries for Sale through Credit/Debit Cards  
Now-a-days sales through Credit/Debit Cards are issued by almost every Bank in India either directly or with collaboration of some other agencies. HSBC Card, SBI Card, BOB Card, ICICI Bank Card, HDFC Card and Andhra Bank Card are some of the popular Cards.
The procedure for issuing Credit/Debit Cards are as follows -
1. A small Plastic Card, called Credit Card is issued by bank to a prospective customer, after verifying his credibility, which is generally measured by his income sources. Debit Card is issued by bank to a customer who has an account with the bank, maintaining a minimum balance. Now a days ATM Card issued by the bank can also be used as Debit Card. This card would contain an embossed 16 digit number and also the name of the cardholder.
2. Generally Bank charges annual subscription fees from the credit card holder. No fee is charged in case of Debit Card, though some banks charge a nominal fee on Debit Card.
3. When the Card holder intends to buy some goods or services through Credit or Debit Card, the seller fills in a form, generally in triplicate, the details of the goods a with the amount of sales and uses the embossed card with the help of the Credit Card machine to print the data on that form. Also the customer has to countersign the form. One carbon copy of the form is given to the customer for the record.
4. The seller sums up the different amounts sold like this and submits, generally everyday, to his bank all the forms. The amount is credited by the bank to the seller's account and debited to the account of the Bank or the company issuing the Credit/Debit Card.
5. The bank issuing the Card, charges commission for each such transaction, which varies between 1% to 4% and is immediately debited to seller's bank account.
6. The bank sends a monthly statement to the card holder. In case of Debit Card the account is immediately debited to the card holder's account, whereas in case of Credit Card, card holder has to pay the amount in full or part. However, if not paid in full, the interest is charged.
Accounting For Credit/Debit Card Sale
From the seller's point of view, this type of sale is equivalent to a cash sale. Commission charged by the bank will be treated as selling expenses. The following journal entries will be made in the seller's books of accounts.
1. Bank A/c Dr.
To Sales Account
(Sales made through Credit/Debit Card)
2. Commission Account Dr.
To Bank Account
(Commission charged by bank)

ILLUSTRATION 5
Enter the following transaction in Cash Bank with Discount and Bank columns. Cheques are first treated as cash receipts -
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevUnit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevSolution:
Unit 5: Cash Book CA CPT Notes | EduRevIf the received cheque is endorsed to other party on the same day then no entry is required. However in the above case posting has been done through cash coloum as the endorsement is done on the next day.

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