Worksheet Solutions: The Beggar Notes | Study English Class 9 - Class 9

Class 9: Worksheet Solutions: The Beggar Notes | Study English Class 9 - Class 9

The document Worksheet Solutions: The Beggar Notes | Study English Class 9 - Class 9 is a part of the Class 9 Course English Class 9.
All you need of Class 9 at this link: Class 9

Q.1. Sergei’s anger had vanished and he now began to feel a little sorry and ashamed of himself for having set a spoiled, drunken, perhaps sick man to work at menial labour in the cold. An hour later Olga came in and announced that the wood had all been chopped.

(i) Why was Sergei angry in the first place?

Because Lushkoff had told him several lies to him to get money.

(ii) What job had Sergei given to the beggar?

To chop the woods.

(iii) Who was Olga?

Sergei’s cook

(iv) What is the irony in the above lines?

It was Olga who actually used to chop all the woods for Lushkoff.


Q.2. What reasons does Lushkoff give to Sergei for telling lies?

Lushkoff said that he was sent away from a Russian choir for drunkenness. He couldn’t get along without lying. No one would give him anything if he told the truth. Hence, he had nothing else to do but lie.


Q.3. What job did Sergei assign to Lushkoff that changed his life?

After moving to another house, Sergei sent for Lushkoff. He asked him to carry a letter to his friend’s house for the work of copying. From that day onwards, Lushkoff never looked back.


Q.4. Describe Lushkoff’s first attempt to work at Sergei’s.

Lushkoff irresolutely pulled a billet of wood towards him, set it up between his feet, and tapped it feebly with the axe. The billet wavered and fell down. He again pulled it to him, blew on his freezing hands, and tapped it with his axe cautiously, as if afraid of hitting his overshoe or of cutting off his finger; the stick of wood again fell to the ground.


Q.5. Sergei says, “I am happy that my words have taken effect.” Why does he say so? Is he justified in saying this?

Sergei says, “I am happy that my words have taken effect.” He says this to Lushkoff because he thinks that Lushkoff changes his ways because of the roasting given by him. Sergei offers a job of chopping woods to the beggar Lushkoff and later on assigns him several tasks/jobs. Lushkoff starts earning. Eventually, he becomes a notary and earns thirty-five roubles a month. Sergei thinks that all this happens because of him. However, he is not justified in thinking so, because in reality, it was Olga, his cook, who compelled Lushkoff to change his ways through her harsh words and noble deeds. She puts herself in misery and cried before Lushkoff while yelling at him and chopping woods for him. This brings a positive change in his heart. So actually, Olga’s words take effect, not Sergei’s.


Q.6. “KIND sir, have pity; turn your attention to a poor, hungry man! For three days I have had nothing to eat; I haven’t five copecks for a lodging, I swear it before God. For eight years I was a village schoolteacher and then I lost my place through intrigues. I fell a victim to calumny. It is a year now since I have had anything to do.”

(i) Who is the speaker in the above lines?

Lushkoff (the beggar)

(ii) What does the speaker try to do in the above lines?

The speaker tries to beg and persuade Sergei to give him money.

(iii) Does the speaker get the help that he asks for? Why?

No, because Sergei realises that the speaker is lying to get money.

(iv) Pick out the word from the extract which means the same as ‘defamation’.

Calumny


Q.7. “I wouldn’t refuse to do that, but in these days even skilled wood-cutters find themselves sitting without bread.” – What does this say about Lushkoff?

The given lines tell that Lushkoff is not a willing worker. He tries to avoid working to the extent possible. However, he gets trapped in his own words to eventually work for Sergei.


Q.8. “Here’s for your pains. I see you are sober and have no objection to work.” Why did Sergei say this to Lushkoff?

Sergei said these words to Lushkoff because the latter was now no longer a beggar or a drunkard. He worked hard to earn himself a living and now had no objection to work.


Q.9. What advice does Sergei give Lushkoff after hearing his reasons for begging?

Sergei advices Lushkoff to work instead of begging. He says that there is plenty of work out there and he should earn himself a living. He should not lead his life by begging.


Q.10. Give a pen-portrait of Olga (Sergei’s cook) in about 100-150 words.

Olga, Sergei’s cook, was a grounded and nice-hearted woman. She was loyal and hardworking as she served Sergei for several years. She was a woman full of sympathy, empathy and emotions for others. This is evident from the fact that it was she who turned Lushkoff from a beggar to a respected and earning individual. She did so through her harsh words and noble deeds. She would sit down opposite him and grow sad, look into his face and weep and tell him that there was no pleasure for him and that he would burn in hell. She shed tears and suffered misery while chopping woods for him. Even Lushkoff couldn’t figure out why he stopped drinking at the sight of her and changed. She brought a change in his heart and set him right.

The document Worksheet Solutions: The Beggar Notes | Study English Class 9 - Class 9 is a part of the Class 9 Course English Class 9.
All you need of Class 9 at this link: Class 9

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