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Class 5 EVS Question Answers - Documents

I. Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)
1.    Which tributary of Indus originates from Himachal Pradesh?
(a)    Satluj
(b)    Beas
(c)    Ravi
(d)    Chenab

2.    Which is the largest tributary of the Ganga?
(a)    Godavari
(b)    Gandak
(c)    Mahanadi
(d)    Yamuna

3.    Which river is known as the ‘sorrow of West Bengal’?
(a)    Damodar
(b)    Indus
(c)    Tapi  
(d)    Narmada

4.    Which river flows through Ladakh, Gilgit and Pakistan?
(a)    Kaveri
(b)    Narmada
(c)    Indus
(d)    Bharmaputra

5.    Which river has no tributaries? 
(a)    Narmada
(b)    Mahanadi
(c)    Yamuna
(d)    Chenab

6.    When does a Trellis pattern develop?
(a)    When the river channel follows the slope of the terrain.
(b)    When a river joined by its tributaries at approximately right angles.
(c)    When a pattern develops on a strongly jointed rocky terrain.
(d)    When streams flow in different directions from a central peak or dome like structure. 

7.    The headwaters of the Ganga is called the
(a)    Bhagirathi
(b)    Alaknanda
(c)    Gangotri Glacier
(d)    None of these

8.    Name the drainage pattern that resembles the branches of a tree.
(a)    Dendritic pattern     
(b)    Rectangular pattern 
(c)    Radial pattern
(d)    Trellis pattern

9.    Where do the Ghaghara, the Gandak and the Kosi rise?
(a)    Punjab Himalaya    
(b)    Nepal Himalaya
(c)    Himachal Himalaya    
(d)    Kumaon Himalaya

10.    Which one is not the tributary of Krishna?
(a)    Koyana
(b)    Musi
(c)    Tungabhadra
(d)    Dibang

11.    The Sundarban delta is the home of which animal?
(a)    Royal Bengal Tiger    
(b)    One-horned rhinoceros
(c)    Tibetan wild ass
(d)    Asiatic lion

12.    Which one of the following rivers makes the second largest waterfall in India?
(a)    Mahanadi
(b)    Tungabhadra
(c)    Kaveri
(d)    Yamuna

13.    The river Brahmaputra is known as Jamuna in 
(a)    Tibet
(b)    Bangladesh
(c)    Nepal
(d)    Bhutan

14.    Which one of the following is the westward flowing river of Peninsular India?
(a)    Mahanadi
(b)    Godavari
(c)    Krishna
(d)    Narmada

Ans.    1.(d)    2.(d)    3.(a)    4.(c)     5.(a)     6.(b)    7.(a)    8.(a)      9.(b)    10.(d)    11.(a)    12.(c)    13.(b)    14.(d).

II. Very Short Answer Type Questions
Q1.    What is called a drainage basin?
Ans.    The area drained by a single river system is called a drainage basin.

Q2.    Which is the world’s largest drainage basin?
Ans.    The Amazon river is the world’s largest drainage basin.

Q3.    What controls the drainage systems of India?
Ans.    The broad relief features of the subcontinent control the drainage systems of India.

Q4.    Name the two major groups the Indian rivers are divided into.
Ans. (i) The Himalayan rivers    (ii) The Peninsular rivers

Q5.    What are perennial rivers?
Ans.    The rivers that have water throughout the year are called perennial rivers.

Q6.    Where do perennial rivers receive water from?
Ans.    Perennial rivers receive water from rain as well as from melted snow from the lofty mountains.

Q7.    Which are the three major Himalayan rivers?
Ans.    The three major Himalayan rivers are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra.

Q8.    Where do most of the rivers of Peninsular India originate? Where do these rivers flow?
Ans.    Most of the rivers of Peninsular India originate in the Western Ghats. These rivers flow towards the Bay of Bengal.

Q9.    Mention two features of the Himalayan rivers.
Ans. (i) The Himalayan rivers are long.    (ii) These rivers are joined by many large and important tributaries.

Q10.    Where does the river Indus rise?
Ans.    The river Indus rises in Tibet, near Lake Mansarovar.

Q11.    Name the tributaries that join the river Indus in the Kashmir region.
Ans.    The Zaskar, the Nubra, the Shyok and the Hunza.

Q12.    What is the total length of the Indus?
Ans.    The total length of the Indus is 2900 km.

Q13.    Which states of India are benefited by the Indus?
Ans.    Punjab, Haryana and the southern and western parts of Rajasthan are benefited by the Indus.

Q14.    List the major tributaries of the river Ganga.
Ans.    The Yamuna, the Ghaghara, the Gandak and the Kosi are the major tributaries of the river Ganga.

Q15.    Where does the Yamuna meet the Ganga?
Ans.    The Yamuna meets the Ganga at Allahabad.

Q16.    Write two facts about the Ghaghara, the Gandak and the Kosi.
Ans. (i)    These rivers flood parts of the northern plains every year, causing widespread damage to life and property.
(ii)    But at the same time they enrich the soil for agriculture.

Q17.    Which are the main tributaries that come from the peninsular uplands?
Ans.    They are the Chambal, the Betwa and the Son.

Q18.    Which is the world’s largest and fastest growing delta?
Ans.    The Sundarban delta is the world’s largest and fastest growing delta.

Q19.    Which city is located on the water divide between the Indus and the Ganga river systems?
Ans.    Ambala is located on the water divide between the Indus and the Ganga river systems.

Q20.    Give one feature of the river Brahmaputra.
Ans.    The Brahmaputra has a braided channel in its entire length in Assam and forms many riverine islands.

Q21.    Name the peninsular rivers of India.
Ans.    The Mahanadi, the Godavari, the Krishna and the Kaveri.

Q22.    Mention two features of the peninsular rivers.
Ans. (i)    The peninsular rivers flow eastwards and drain into the Bay of Bengal.
(ii)    These rivers make deltas at their mouths.

Q23.    The Narmada Basin creates many picturesque locations. Name two of them.
Ans. (i) The ‘Marble rocks’ near Jabalpur.     (ii) The ‘Dhuadhar falls’.

Q24.    Where does the river Tapi rise?
Ans.    The river Tapi rises in the Satpura ranges in the Betul district of Madhya Pradesh.

Q25.    Which are the major west-flowing rivers?
Ans.    Sabarmati, Mahi, Bharathpuzha and Periyar are the major west-flowing rivers.

Q26.    Which is the largest peninsular river?
Ans.    The Godavari is the largest peninsular river.

Q27.    Where does the river Godavari rise?
Ans.    The river Godavari rises from the slopes of the Western Ghats in the Nasik district of Maharashtra.

Q28.    Name the tributaries of the river Godavari.
Ans.    The Purna, the Wardha, the Pranhita, the Manjra, the Wainganga and the Penganga.

Q29.    Why are the Manjra, the Wainganga and the Penganga together known as the ‘Dakshin Ganga’?
Ans.    These rivers are very large and cover a large area. Therefore, they are known as the ‘Dakshin Ganga’.

Q30.    Which are the main tributaries of the river Krishna?
Ans.    The Tungabhadra, the Koyana, the Ghatpraba, the Musi and the Bhenia are the main tributaries of the river Krishna.

Q31.    Name some freshwater lakes of India.
Ans.    The Wular lake, the Dal lake, Bhimtal, Nainital, Loktak and Barapani.

Q32.    Write two uses of lakes.
Ans. (i)    Lakes help to regulate the flow of rivers.   (ii)    They moderate the climate of the surroundings.

Q33.    Mention two reasons due to which the pollution level of many rivers has been rising.
Ans. (i) Increasing urbanisation    (ii)     Increasing industrialisation.

Q34.    What is water pollution?
Ans.    Water pollution refers to any unwanted waste material is added to water which makes it poisonous and useless.

III. Short Answer Type Questions
Q1.    Define the term ‘drainage’. Describe different drainage patterns.
Ans.    The term ‘drainage’ describes the river system of an area. The streams within a drainage basin (the area drained by a single river system) form certain patterns which are given below:

Class 5 EVS Question Answers - Documents     
Drainage Patterns

(i)    Dendritic pattern: The dendritic drainage pattern develops where the river channel follows the slope of the terrain. The stream with its tributaries resembles the branches of a tree, thus the name ‘dendritic’.
(ii)    Trellis pattern: This drainage pattern develops when a river is joined by its tributaries at approximately right angles. This drainage pattern also develops where hard and soft rocks exist parallel to each other.
(iii)    Rectangular pattern: This drainage pattern develops on a strongly jointed rocky terrain.
(iv)    Radial pattern: This drainage pattern develops when streams flow in different directions from a central peak or a dome-like structure.

Q2.    Enumerate some important features of the Himalayan rivers.    [HOTS]
Ans.        Some important features of the Himalayan rivers are given below:
(i)    Most of the Himalayan rivers are perennial in nature. It means that they have water throughout the year. These rivers receive water from rain as well as from melting of snow.
(ii)    The Himalayan rivers have long courses from their sources to the sea.
(iii)    They perform intensive erosional activity in their upper courses and carry huge loads of silt and sand. In the middle and the lower courses, these rivers form meanders, ox-bow lakes and many other depositional features in their floodplains.
(iv)    They also have well-developed deltas.

Q3.    Give a brief description of the Ganga river system.
Ans. (i) The headwaters of the Ganga, called the Bhagirathi, is fed by the Gangotri glacier and joined by the Alaknanda at Devprayag in Uttarakhand. At Haridwar the Ganga emerges from the mountains on to the plains.
(ii)    The Ganga is joined by many tributaries from the Himalayas. These are the Yamuna, the Ghaghara, the Gandak and the Kosi.
(iii)    The river Yamuna flows parallel to the Ganga and as a right bank tributary, meets the Ganga at Allahabad.
(iv)    The Ghaghara, the Gandak and the Kosi rise in the Nepal Himalayas. The main tributaries which come from the peninsular uplands are the Chambal, the Betwa and the Son.
(v)    Enlarged with the water from its right and left bank tributaries, the Ganga flows eastwards till Farakka in West Bengal. The length of the Ganga is over 2500 km.

Q4.    Mention some important features of the Brahmaputra river system.
Ans.    Some important features of the Brahmaputra river system are: 
(i)    The Brahmaputra rises in Tibet, east of Mansarovar lake. It is slightly longer than the Indus and most of its course lies outside India.
(ii)    It has a braided channel in its entire length in Assam and forms many riverine islands.
(iii)    Every year during the rainy season, the river overflows its banks, causing widespread devastation due to floods in Assam and Bangladesh.
(iv)    The Brahmaputra is marked by huge deposits of silt on its bed causing the river bed rise. 
(v)    The river also shifts its channel frequently.

Q5.    Give an account of the Godavari Basin.
                    Or
        Write the important features of the Godavari Basin.
Ans. (i) The Godavari is the largest peninsular river. It rises from the slopes of the Western Ghats in the Nasik district of Maharashtra.
(ii)    Its length is about 1500 km. It drains into the Bay of Bengal. Its drainage basin is also the largest among the peninsular rivers.
(iii)    The basin covers parts of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha and Andhra Pradesh. The Godavari is joined by a number of tributaries such as the Purna, the Wardha, the Pranhita, the Manjra, the Wainganga and the Penganga.
(v)    The Manjra, the Wainganga and the Penganga are very large. They are together known as the ‘Dakshin Ganga’ because of their length and the area they cover.

Q6.    In what different ways do rivers get polluted?            [HOTS]
Or
What are the causes that pollute rivers?
Ans.    Rivers get polluted in the following ways:
(i)    River water is used for domestic, municipal, industrial and agricultural purposes. This affects the quality of water. The volume of river is also reduced because more and more water is being drained out of them.
(ii)    A heavy load of untreated sewage and industrial effluents are emptied into the rivers. This affects not only the quality of water but also the self-cleansing capacity of the river.
(iii)    The increasing urbanisation and industrialisation also contribute to the river pollution. Due to these reasons the pollution level of many rivers has been rising.

Q7.    Classify lakes in three categories. Also give examples.
Ans.    Indian lakes are classified into three categories namely—
(i)    Freshwater lakes: They are mainly found in Himalayan region. They are of glacial origin. They are formed when glaciers dug out a basin, which was later filled with snowmelt. The Wular lake is the largest fresh water lake of India. Other freshwater lakes are the Dal lake, Bhimtal, Loktak and Barapani.
(ii)    Salt water lakes: They are mainly found in Rajasthan. The Sambhar Lake in the desert region of Rajasthan is a salt water lake. Its water is used for making salt.
(iii)    Lagoon: It is a shallow body of water separated from the sea by a narrow strip of land or by a sand bar. Spits and bars form lagoons in the coastal areas. The Chilka Lake in Odisha and the Pulicat lake near Chennai are examples of lagoons on the eastern coast of India.

Q8.    How is Sundarban Delta formed?        [HOTS]
Ans.    When the Ganga flows towards West Bengal, it splits into two the Bhagirathi-Hooghly (a distributary) flows southwards through the deltaic plains to the Bay of Bengal. The main stream flows southwards into Bangladesh and is joined by the Brahmaputra, thus resulting in the formation of a delta. The delta formed by these rivers is known as the Sundarban Delta. The Sundarban Delta derived its name from the Sundari tree which grows well in marsh land. It is the world’s largest and fastest growing delta.

Q9.    Why are the peninsular rivers not navigable?            [HOTS]
Ans.    The peninsular rivers are not navigable because of the following reasons:
(i)    A large number of the peninsular rivers are seasonal. The flow of these rivers depends upon rainfall and they usually get dried up in the summer.
(ii)    River beds are uneven, rocky and have sharp slopes.
(iii)    Construction of dams is difficult as a result of which navigation is not possible.

Q10.    Write some important facts about the Narmada Basin.
Ans. (i) The Narmada rises in the Amarkantak hills in Madhya Pradesh. It flows towards the west in a rift valley formed due to faulting.
(ii)    On its way to the sea, the Narmada creates many picturesque locations. The ‘Marble Rocks’ near Jabalpur where the Narmada flows through a deep gorge and the ‘Dhuadhar Falls’ where the river plunges over steep rocks, are some of the notable ones.
(iii)    All the tributaries of Narmada are very short and most of these join the main stream at right angles. The Narmada Basin covers parts of Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat.

Q11.    Write a short note on the Krishna Basin.
Ans. (i) The Krishna river from a spring near Mahabaleshwar flows for about 1400 km and reaches the Bay of Bengal.
(ii)    Some of its tributaries are the Tungabhadra, the Koyana, the Ghatprabha, the Musi and the Bhima.
(iii)    Its drainage basin is shared by Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh.

Q12.    What are the characteristic features of the Tapi Basin?
Ans. (i) The Tapi rises in the Satpura ranges in the Betul district of Madhya Pradesh.
(ii)    It also flows in a rift valley parallel to the Narmada but it is much shorter in length.
(iii)    Its basin covers parts of Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat and Maharashtra.
(iv)    The main west-flowing rivers are Sabarmati, Mahi, Bharathpuzha and Periyar.

Q13.    Why is pollution rate of rivers increasing day by day?    [HOTS]
Ans.    The pollution rate of rivers is increasing because—
(i)    Heavy load of untreated sewage and industrial effluents are emptied into rivers.
(ii)    Increasing urbanisation has raised the pollution level of rivers.
(iii)    Domestic, municipal and agricultural wastages are emptied into rivers.

Q14.    Write a short note on National River Conservation Plan (NRCP).
Ans.    The river cleaning programme in India started with the launching of the Ganga Action Plan (GAP) in 1985. The Ganga Action Plan was expanded to cover other rivers under the National River Conservation Plan (NRCP) in the year 1995. The objective of the NRCP is to improve the water quality of rivers, which are major water sources in the country, through the implementation of pollution abatement work.

IV. Long Answer Type Questions
Q1.    Describe the major peninsular rivers of India.
Ans.    The major peninsular rivers are the Mahanadi, the Godavari, the Krishna and the Kaveri. These rivers flow eastwards and drain into the Bay of Bengal. They make deltas at their mouths.
(i)    The Godavari Basin: The Godavari is the largest peninsular river. It rises from the slopes of the Western Ghats in the Nasik district of Maharashtra. Its length is about 1500 km. It is joined by a number of tributaries such as the Purna, the Wardha, the Pranhita, the Manjra, the Wainganga and the Penganga. The last three tributaries are very large and collectively called the ‘Dakshin Ganga’.
(ii)    The Mahanadi Basin: It rises in the high lands of Chhattisgarh. It flows through Odisha to reach the Bay of Bengal. The length of the river is about 860 km. Its drainage basin is shared by Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and Odisha.
(iii)    The Krishna Basin: It rises from a spring near Mahabaleshwar. It flows for about 1400 km and reaches the Bay of Bengal. The Tungabhadra, the Koyana, the Ghatprabha, the Musi and the Bhima are some of its tributaries. Its drainage basin is shared by Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh.
(iv)    The Kaveri Basin: It rises in the Brahmagiri range of the Western Ghats and it reaches the Bay of Bengal in south of Cuddalore, in Tamil Nadu. Total length of this river is about 760 km. Its main tributaries are Amravati, Bhavani, Hemavati and Kabini. Its basin drains part of Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu.

Q2.    Give an account of the Himalayan rivers of India.
Ans.    The major Himalayan rivers are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. These rivers are long and are joined by many large and important tributaries. 
(i)    The Indus River System: The Indus river rises in Tibet, near Lake Mansarovar. Flowing west, it enters India in the Ladakh district of Jammu and Kashmir. Several tributaries like the Zaskar, the Nubra, the Shyok and the Hunza join it in the Kashmir region. The Indus flows through Baltistan and Gilgit and emerges from the mountains at Attock. The Satluj, the Beas, the Ravi, the Chenab and the Jhelum join together to enter the Indus near Mithankot in Pakistan. Beyond this, the Indus flows southwards eventually reaching the Arabian Sea, east of Karachi. The total length of this river is 2900 km.
(ii)    The Ganga River System: The headwaters of the Ganga, called the Bhagirathi, is led by the Gangotri Glacier and joined by the Alaknanda at Devprayag in Uttarakhand. At Haridwar the Ganga emerges from the mountains on to the plains. The Ganga is joined by many tributaries from the Himalayas. These are the Yamuna, the Ghaghara, the Kosi and the Gandak. The river Yamuna rises from the Yamunotri Glacier in the Himalayas. It flows parallel to the Ganga and as a right bank tributary, meets the Ganga at Allahabad. The Ghaghara, the Gandak and the Kosi rise in the Nepal Himalayas. The main tributaries that come from the peninsular uplands are the Chambal, the Betwa and the Son. Enlarged with the waters from its right and left bank tributaries, the Ganga flows eastwards till Farakka in West Bengal. This is the northernmost point of the Ganga delta. The river bifurcates here. The Bhagirathi-Hooghly here flows southwards through the deltaic plains to the Bay of Bengal. The length of the Ganga is over 2500 km.
(iii)    The Brahmaputra River System: The Brahmaputra rises in Tibet east of Mansarovar lake very close to the sources of the Indus and the Satluj. It is slightly longer than the Indus, and most of its course lies outside India. It flows eastwards parallel to the Himalayas. On reaching the Namcha Barwa, it takes a ‘U’-turn and enters India in Arunachal Pradesh through a gorge. Here it is called the Dihang and it is joined by the Dibang, the Lohit, and many other tributaries to form Brahmaputra in Assam.

Q3.    How do lakes of India differ from each other in the size and other characteristics? Explain with examples.            [HOTS]
Ans. (i) We find many lakes in India. These lakes differ from each other in the size and other characteristics. Most lakes are permanent, some contain water only during the rainy season, like the lakes in the basins of inland drainage of semi-arid regions. There are some of the lakes which are the result of the action of glaciers and ice sheets, while the others have been formed by wind, river action, and human activities.
(ii)    A meandering river across a floodplain forms cut-offs that later develop into ox-bow lakes. Spits and bars form lagoons in the coastal area, for instance, the Chilika lake, the Pulicat lake, the Kolleru lake. Lakes in the region of inland drainage are sometimes seasonal. For instance, the Sambhar lake in Rajasthan.
(iii)    Most of the fresh water lakes are located in the Himalayan region. These lakes are of glacial origin. It means that they formed when glaciers dug out a basin, which was later filled with snowmelt.
The Wular lake in Jammu and Kashmir, in contrast, is the result of the tectonic activity. It is the largest freshwater lake in India. Other freshwater lakes are the Dal lake, Bhimtal, Loktak, Nainital and Barapani.
(iv)    Some lakes are artificial, i.e., they are created by humans for the generation of hydel power. Guru Gobind Sagar is such a lake.

Q5.    Differentiate between the Ganga and the Godavari river system.
Ans.

S.No. Ganga River System Godavari River System
   It is a Himalayan river. It is a peninsular river.
  At Haridwar the Ganga emerges from the mountains onto the plains.  
     
     

(i)       
(ii)        It rises from the slopes of the Western Ghats in the Nashik district of Maharashtra.
(iii)    The length of the Ganga is over 2,500 km.    Its length is 
1,500 km.
(iv)    Its tributaries are: Ghaghara, Kosi, Gandak, Son, Betwa, Chambal, etc.    Its tributaries are: Purna, Wardha, Pranhirta, etc.
 

Class 5 EVS Question Answers - Documents

Q6.    Discuss the significant difference between the Himalayan and the Peninsular rivers.
Himalayan rivers    Peninsular rivers
(i) These rivers are perennial as they receive water both from rainfall and melting of the snow.    These rivers are seasonal, as there flow is dependent on rainfall.
(ii) These rivers have longer courses from source to the sea.    These rivers have shorter and shallower courses
(iii) They perform intensive  activities and carry loads of silt and sand. They  make features like gorges, oxbow lakes, meanders etc.    Due to hard rocks and lack of silt and sediment they do not form meanders and oxbow lakes.
(iv) They flow in levelled northern plains, and they are useful for irrigation and navigation.    They flow an uneven rocky surface. Therefore, they are not useful for irrigation and navigation.
(v) They bring with them fertile alluvium which they deposit in the Indo-Gangetic plains.    As the current is swift, so they do not bring with them enough alluvium.
(vi) The porous soil absorbs a lot of water which is later used as groundwater by digging wells and tubewells.    The rocky soil does not absorb any water, so digging wells is not possible.
(vii) Examples:  Ganga, Yamuna, Ghagra, Gandak, Kosi, etc.    Examples: Mahanadi, Godavari, Krishna, Kaveri, Narmada, Tapi, etc.

    Q7.    Describe the major steps in brief taken by government of India to control the pollution level in rivers.
Ans.    The government of India has taken some major steps to control the pollution level in rivers:
    (i)    Treating of waste before dumping in rivers.
    (ii)    Taking projects to control water pollution in rivers, for example—
    ∑    The river cleaning programme in the country was initiated with the launching of the Ganga Action Plan (GAP) in 1985. Its objective is to improve the water quality of rivers, which are major water sources in the country, through the implementation of pollution abatement work.
    ∑    In June 2014, the Central Government approved a flagship programme ‘Namami Gange’ which integrates the effects to clean and protect the national river Ganga in a comprehensive manner.
    ∑    The Narmada river conservation mission has been undertaken by the government of Madhya Pradesh by a scheme named ‘Namami Devi Narmade’.
V. Map Skills
    Q1.    Identify the following rivers marked on an outline map of India:    
(as per the CBSE Map List 2017-18)
    (i)    Three Himalayan River Systems (ii) Six Peninsular Rivers

Ans.    1. (a) Indus (b) Ganges (c) Satluj
        2. (a) Narmada (b) Tapi (c) Kaveri (d) Krishna (e) Godavari (f ) Mahanadi
    Q2.    Identify the following lakes marked on an outline map of India.
(as per the CBSE Map List 2017-18)
    

Ans.    1. Wular 2. Pulicat 3. Sambhar 4. Chilika 5. Vembanad 6. Kolleru
VI. Value-based Questions
    Q1.    Lakes play an important role in making a place attractive to tourists. Apart from attraction for tourists, lakes are also useful to human beings in many ways. How can you contribute to maintain its attraction? Express your views in brief.
Ans.    I can contribute to maintain its attraction in the following:
(i)    Creating awareness among the tourists.
(ii)    Minimising environmental pollution.
(iii)    Asking tourists not to throw any foreign material into the lakes.
(iv)    Avoiding crowd around the lakes.
    Q2.    Rivers have been of fundamental importance throughout the human history. Water from the rivers is a basic natural resource, essential for various human activities. How can you contribute to keep them away from pollution? Express your views in brief.
Ans.(i) Creating awareness among the people.
(ii)    Dumping waste material in a proper place.
(iii)    Checking animal bath in the rivers.
(iv)    Checking the speedy growth of urbanisation and industrialisation.
(v)    Prohibiting people from immersing idols into the rivers.
test your skills
    1.    Give a brief description of the Indus river system.
    2.    Which is the world’s largest and fastest growing delta?
    3.    What are the major features of the peninsular rivers?
    4.    Name the east-flowing and the west-flowing rivers of the peninsular plateau.
    5.    What is the length of the river Mahanadi? Where does it rise?


The document Class 5 EVS Question Answers - Documents is a part of the Class 9 Course Extra Documents & Tests for Class 9.
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FAQs on Class 5 EVS Question Answers - Documents

1. What is the exam pattern for Class 9?
Ans. The exam pattern for Class 9 usually consists of a combination of objective and subjective questions. It may include multiple-choice questions, short answer questions, long answer questions, and practical assessments depending on the subject.
2. How can I prepare effectively for the Class 9 exams?
Ans. To prepare effectively for the Class 9 exams, it is important to create a study schedule and stick to it. Revise the topics regularly, practice sample papers, solve previous years' question papers, and seek help from teachers or classmates for any doubts or clarifications.
3. What are the important topics to focus on for the Class 9 exams?
Ans. The important topics to focus on for the Class 9 exams vary based on the subjects. However, some common subjects like Mathematics, Science, Social Science, and English have key topics that should be given extra attention. It is recommended to refer to the syllabus and consult teachers for a better understanding of the important topics.
4. Are there any tips to manage time effectively during the Class 9 exams?
Ans. Yes, there are a few tips to manage time effectively during the Class 9 exams. Firstly, read the question paper thoroughly before starting to answer. Divide the time for each section based on the marks allotted. Start with the easier questions to gain confidence and save time for the tougher ones. Avoid spending too much time on a single question and move on if you get stuck. Lastly, leave some time for revision at the end.
5. How can I overcome exam stress and perform well in Class 9 exams?
Ans. Exam stress is common, but there are ways to overcome it and perform well in Class 9 exams. Practice regular breathing exercises or meditation to relax the mind. Break down the study material into smaller portions and set achievable goals. Take short breaks in between study sessions to refresh the mind. Stay positive, maintain a healthy lifestyle, and get enough sleep to stay focused and perform to the best of your abilities.
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