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Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Banking Exams MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test - Test: Type III (Conjunctions)

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) for Banking Exams 2024 is part of Banking Exams preparation. The Test: Type III (Conjunctions) questions and answers have been prepared according to the Banking Exams exam syllabus.The Test: Type III (Conjunctions) MCQs are made for Banking Exams 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) below.
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Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 1

Fill in the blank with the best possible option:

Spicy food such _____ the curry which we had yesterday is not good for health.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 1

The given sentence is about the different types of spicy food. To introduce the examples or the types of a particular banner, we pair 'as' with 'such' and create the idiom or phrase 'such as'. Hence option B is correct. 'That' when paired with 'such' refers to an extent of something as in 'It was such an interesting story that I finished reading it in one sitting'. It does not refer to an example. Hence, option A is incorrect. 'If' refers to a condition, a hypothetical situation that may or may not be true as in 'I'll go if you come with me'. There isn't any hypothetical situation here, and 'if' doesn't pair up with 'such' as they have different meanings, hence option C is incorrect. 'Or' is used to present a choice between two things 'this or that'. There isn't a choice between the hobbies in this sentence, hence it can't be paired with 'such' and option D is incorrect.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 2

Choose the option that best fills in the blank

_________ you called, he was holding his newborn baby. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 2

A conjunction combines or connects two sentences as one. When one of them depends on the other for its full meaning, that clause is the subordinate clause and the clause it depends on is the main clause. Here, we require a time-related conjunction as both clauses are in terms of the events (you called, he was holding his newborn baby) occurring at a particular time. From the options, 'when' is the most suitable option, as it demonstrates an interruption, there's a very short lapse in time between 'you calling and him picking up the phone', they both don't occur at the same time, but the second activity interrupts the first, hence we use 'when' and not 'while'. 'While' is used when two activities are taking place simultaneously, but here they aren't. Hence option A is correct and B is incorrect.
 'But' is a coordinating conjunction used when both clauses are independent and do not depend on the other for their full meaning, and is used to express a contrast in meaning between these clauses. But here we don't need a coordinating conjunction, and the clauses are not contrast-related, hence option C is incorrect. 'For' is also a coordinating conjunction, used when one clause is inferred or deduced from another, and that isn't the case here, hence option D is incorrect.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 3

Choose the option that best fills in the blank:
 
We stopped playing _________ we received his call.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 3

A conjunction combines or connects two sentences as one. When one of them depends on the other for its full meaning, that clause is the subordinate clause and the clause it depends on is the main clause. Here, we require a time-related conjunction as both clauses are in terms of the events (we stopped playing, we received his call) occurring at a particular time. From the options, 'when' is the most suitable option, as it demonstrates an interruption, there's a very short lapse in time between the two events, they both don't occur at the same time, but the second activity interrupts the first, hence we use 'when' and not 'while'. 'While' is used when two activities are taking place simultaneously, but here they aren't. Hence option A is correct and B is incorrect.
 'But' is a coordinating conjunction used when both clauses are independent and do not depend on the other for their full meaning, and is used to express a contrast in meaning between these clauses. But here we don't need a coordinating conjunction, and the clauses are not contrast-related, hence option C is incorrect. 'For' is also a coordinating conjunction, used when one clause is inferred or deduced from another, and that isn't the case here, hence option D is incorrect.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 4

Choose the correct option:

Hardly had I closed my eyes ________ the alarm rang.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 4

When a story is told in the past tense, the adverbials hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are often used to emphasize that one event quickly followed another. The verb describing the earlier event is usually in the past perfect tense. If hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted.
Note that hardly, scarcely and barely are followed by when, while no sooner is followed by than.
Than provides a form of contrast between two events.
When is obviously related to time.
Hence, Option A - 'when' is correct, and the other options cancel out.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 5

Fill in the blank with the most appropriate option:

I had hardly reached the corner of the street ________ I heard someone's steps behind me.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 5

When a story is told in the past tense, the adverbials hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are often used to emphasize that one event quickly followed another. The verb describing the earlier event is usually in the past perfect tense. If hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted.
Note that hardly, scarcely and barely are followed by when, while no sooner is followed by than.
Than provides a form of contrast between two events.
When is obviously related to time.
Hence, Option A - 'when' is correct, and the other options cancel out.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 6

Fill in the blank with the most appropriate conjunction.
No sooner did the mariner set the sails __________ it began to rain.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 6

In the given sentence, the two events are: (1) The mariner set the sails; and (2) It began to rain. The second event happened immediately after the first. 
If there are two activities or events and the second event occurs immediately after the first, we can express the same using the conjunction, 'No sooner... than'.  The phrase, 'No sooner' introduces the first event. This is already given in the sentence. The word, 'than' introduces the second event. Hence, the most appropriate conjunction to fill the blank and precede the second event (It began to rain) is, 'than'. Option B is the correct answer. 
Option A: The word 'then' when used alone (without the word, 'If) in a sentence is an adverb, which means 'at that time'. Hence, this is not the correct answer. 
Option C: When the word 'then' is used alone in a sentence (i.e. without the word, 'If), it acts an adverb of time and means 'at that time'. It cannot be used in a sentence when the conjunction, 'No sooner' is used. The appropriate way of using it is: 'When the mariner set the sails, it began to rain'. Hence, option C is incorrect. 
Option D: The word 'after' is a conjunction which means, 'during the period of time following (an event)'. It cannot be used in a sentence when the conjunction, 'No sooner' is used. The appropriate way of using it is: 'After the mariner set the sails, it began to rain'. Hence, option D is incorrect. 

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 7

Fill in the blank with the most appropriate option:

Hardly had I reached the bus-stop _________ the bus arrived.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 7

When a story is told in the past tense, the adverbials hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are often used to emphasize that one event quickly followed another. The verb describing the earlier event is usually in the past perfect tense. If hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted.
Note that hardly, scarcely and barely are followed by when, while no sooner is followed by than.
Than provides a form of contrast between two events.
When is obviously related to time.
Hence, Option B - 'when' is correct, and the other options cancel out.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 8

Combine the sentences correctly using 'so...that':
The earrings were beautiful. I had to buy them. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 8

'So that' is used to talk about a purpose. In the given sentence, the purpose is buying the earrings. 'So' is followed by an adjective. Options B, C and D are grammatically wrong. Thus, option A is the correct answer. 

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 9

Combine the sentences correctly using 'so...that':
James is arrogant. He would never ask for help. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 9

A conjunction combines or connects two sentences as one. They can be a word or a phrase (like even if, as well as, etc). Correlative conjunctions are words in pairs that connect two sentences, but they're not written together, for example, either...or, but...and, such...that etc, where a word or phrase is in between the pair, (either rice or noodles). 'So that' and 'so...that' have different meanings. 'So that' refers to purpose, it expresses the reason for which an action is carried out, as in 'I left early so that I could attend the party'. The given sentence does not focus on purpose, but the result, 'so' emphasizes the quality of being arrogant, which results in "he would never ask for help". This can be seen in option A, hence it's correct. 'So that' in option B refers to a purpose, the sentence changes the meaning to 'for the purpose of not asking for help, James is arrogant', which isn't true, hence option B is incorrect. The construction of 'So arrogant James is' is incorrect, as a sentence of this type cannot begin with 'so', hence C is incorrect. 'That' in D functions as a demonstrative adjective, referring to James, whereas 'so...that' is supposed to focus on the effect of being arrogant. the order has also changed, where 'that' precedes 'so', making option D incorrect for these reasons.

Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 10

Choose the option that best fills the blank:
No sooner had I received her text, ____ I left for her house.

Detailed Solution for Test: Type III (Conjunctions) - Question 10

Conjunctions are words that link other words, phrases, or clauses together.
The structure no sooner is used to talk about something that happens immediately after something else. When no sooner comes at the beginning of a sentence, we use inverted word order. That means the auxiliary verb comes before the subject. The conjunction 'No sooner ---- than' is also used to denote simultaneous actions. The given sentence depicts that as soon as I received her text, I left for her house immediately. These two activities take place almost simultaneously. There is no real time difference between them. Thus Option B is correct. Option A can be ruled out as but is used to introduce a word or phrase that contrasts with what was said before.'For' explains reason or sights purpose.Thus Option D can be ruled out.We can use 'when' to introduce a single completed event that takes place in the middle of a longer activity or event. In these cases, we usually use a continuous verb in the main clause to describe the background event. Thus Option C is incorrect as it cannot be used along with 'no sooner'.

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