CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1


34 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2020 | CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1


Description
This mock test of CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 34 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other CAT Verbal And RC MCQ - 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There is a widespread myth that Hitler had a personal ambition to kill all the Jews in the world. Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leadership in Germany and starting World War II was to kill the Jews. This is not supported by any part of the historical record, which indicates instead that his overt political motivation was to avenge Germany's defeat in World War I, and that his covert personal motivation was probably to glorify himself.
The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust was all too real, but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews. Instead, the millions of innocent civilians including women and children who perished in horrifying death camps were the collateral damage of a war that had no mercy for any segment of humanity. The poor Jewish victims of the Holocaust had been left helpless because they lacked the protection of their own nation during an era of violent nationalism. The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator, and it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees during the many years that Nazi bureaucrats tried to arrange their deportation.
The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.
The Nazi movement's most active opposition during the period of Hitler's rise to power were the various German Communist parties, which also strove to overthrow the weak Weimar Republic. In the years after World War I in Europe, Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were. A coalition of Jewish and non-Jewish Communists had taken over Russia in the final year of World War I and fear of Jewish/Communist revolution was absolutely rampant all over Europe after the war was over. Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.
Today when we think of European Jews, we think of Anne Frank or Schindler's list. But the fear of Communist revolution formed the entire context for the political meaning of the term "Jew" among the parties fighting for power in 1920s and 1930s Germany. Just as today in the United States of America the word "Muslim” is often used (unfairly) as a synonym for "terrorist", in Weimar Germany the word "Jew" was often used as a synonym for "Communist". This important but often forgotten fact explains a lot about the root causes of the Holocaust.

Q.An appropriate title for this passage would be:

Solution:

- The passage does not speak praises of Hitler. Hence, option 1 can be ruled out.

- The passage talks about Hitler as a leader, an aggressive patriot after World War I, but not a hater of Jews. Therefore, option 2 can be ruled out.

- The passage states - "The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.", thus option 4 is incorrect.

- The first paragraph mentions- “There is a widespread myth ... motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews.”, validates option 3.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 2

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There is a widespread myth that Hitler had a personal ambition to kill all the Jews in the world. Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leadership in Germany and starting World War II was to kill the Jews. This is not supported by any part of the historical record, which indicates instead that his overt political motivation was to avenge Germany's defeat in World War I, and that his covert personal motivation was probably to glorify himself.
The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust was all too real, but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews. Instead, the millions of innocent civilians including women and children who perished in horrifying death camps were the collateral damage of a war that had no mercy for any segment of humanity. The poor Jewish victims of the Holocaust had been left helpless because they lacked the protection of their own nation during an era of violent nationalism. The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator, and it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees during the many years that Nazi bureaucrats tried to arrange their deportation.
The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.
The Nazi movement's most active opposition during the period of Hitler's rise to power were the various German Communist parties, which also strove to overthrow the weak Weimar Republic. In the years after World War I in Europe, Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were. A coalition of Jewish and non-Jewish Communists had taken over Russia in the final year of World War I and fear of Jewish/Communist revolution was absolutely rampant all over Europe after the war was over. Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.
Today when we think of European Jews, we think of Anne Frank or Schindler's list. But the fear of Communist revolution formed the entire context for the political meaning of the term "Jew" among the parties fighting for power in 1920s and 1930s Germany. Just as today in the United States of America the word "Muslim” is often used (unfairly) as a synonym for "terrorist", in Weimar Germany the word "Jew" was often used as a synonym for "Communist". This important but often forgotten fact explains a lot about the root causes of the Holocaust.

Q.Which of these statements is FALSE about the Holocaust as mentioned in the passage?

Solution:

- Option 1 is true as supported by - “...it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees...”

- Option 2 is true as supported by - but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews.”

- Option 3 is true as the passage states - “The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator”

- Option 4 is false as the passage does not mention that Hitler empathized or regretted the deaths of innocent women and children.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 3

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There is a widespread myth that Hitler had a personal ambition to kill all the Jews in the world. Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leadership in Germany and starting World War II was to kill the Jews. This is not supported by any part of the historical record, which indicates instead that his overt political motivation was to avenge Germany's defeat in World War I, and that his covert personal motivation was probably to glorify himself.
The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust was all too real, but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews. Instead, the millions of innocent civilians including women and children who perished in horrifying death camps were the collateral damage of a war that had no mercy for any segment of humanity. The poor Jewish victims of the Holocaust had been left helpless because they lacked the protection of their own nation during an era of violent nationalism. The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator, and it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees during the many years that Nazi bureaucrats tried to arrange their deportation.
The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.
The Nazi movement's most active opposition during the period of Hitler's rise to power were the various German Communist parties, which also strove to overthrow the weak Weimar Republic. In the years after World War I in Europe, Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were. A coalition of Jewish and non-Jewish Communists had taken over Russia in the final year of World War I and fear of Jewish/Communist revolution was absolutely rampant all over Europe after the war was over. Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.
Today when we think of European Jews, we think of Anne Frank or Schindler's list. But the fear of Communist revolution formed the entire context for the political meaning of the term "Jew" among the parties fighting for power in 1920s and 1930s Germany. Just as today in the United States of America the word "Muslim” is often used (unfairly) as a synonym for "terrorist", in Weimar Germany the word "Jew" was often used as a synonym for "Communist". This important but often forgotten fact explains a lot about the root causes of the Holocaust.

Q.“Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were.” From the above we can infer that: 

Solution:

- Option 2 with just “Jews” is incorrect as the quoted text states “they often were” and not “all”.

- Option 3 with “Christianity” is out of context.

- Option 4 is incorrect with “Communist Revolution”. The quoted text only talks about being a Communist and not being part of the Communist Revolution.

- Option 1 is appropriate with “most” and “Communists”. Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 4

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There is a widespread myth that Hitler had a personal ambition to kill all the Jews in the world. Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leadership in Germany and starting World War II was to kill the Jews. This is not supported by any part of the historical record, which indicates instead that his overt political motivation was to avenge Germany's defeat in World War I, and that his covert personal motivation was probably to glorify himself.
The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust was all too real, but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews. Instead, the millions of innocent civilians including women and children who perished in horrifying death camps were the collateral damage of a war that had no mercy for any segment of humanity. The poor Jewish victims of the Holocaust had been left helpless because they lacked the protection of their own nation during an era of violent nationalism. The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator, and it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees during the many years that Nazi bureaucrats tried to arrange their deportation.
The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.
The Nazi movement's most active opposition during the period of Hitler's rise to power were the various German Communist parties, which also strove to overthrow the weak Weimar Republic. In the years after World War I in Europe, Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were. A coalition of Jewish and non-Jewish Communists had taken over Russia in the final year of World War I and fear of Jewish/Communist revolution was absolutely rampant all over Europe after the war was over. Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.
Today when we think of European Jews, we think of Anne Frank or Schindler's list. But the fear of Communist revolution formed the entire context for the political meaning of the term "Jew" among the parties fighting for power in 1920s and 1930s Germany. Just as today in the United States of America the word "Muslim” is often used (unfairly) as a synonym for "terrorist", in Weimar Germany the word "Jew" was often used as a synonym for "Communist". This important but often forgotten fact explains a lot about the root causes of the Holocaust.

Q.Which of the following weakens what is said about Hitler in the passage? 

Solution:

- Options 1 and 2 can be ruled out as they are supported by the first paragraph of the passage.

- Option 3 can be ruled out as the passage states - “Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leardership in Germany and starting World War I was to kill the Jews.”

- From the passage, we can infer that Hitler was insecure and scared of the Communist Parties as he used an aggressive political strategy to wipe out as many Communists as possible. This validates option 4.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 5

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There is a widespread myth that Hitler had a personal ambition to kill all the Jews in the world. Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leadership in Germany and starting World War II was to kill the Jews. This is not supported by any part of the historical record, which indicates instead that his overt political motivation was to avenge Germany's defeat in World War I, and that his covert personal motivation was probably to glorify himself.
The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust was all too real, but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews. Instead, the millions of innocent civilians including women and children who perished in horrifying death camps were the collateral damage of a war that had no mercy for any segment of humanity. The poor Jewish victims of the Holocaust had been left helpless because they lacked the protection of their own nation during an era of violent nationalism. The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator, and it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees during the many years that Nazi bureaucrats tried to arrange their deportation.
The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.
The Nazi movement's most active opposition during the period of Hitler's rise to power were the various German Communist parties, which also strove to overthrow the weak Weimar Republic. In the years after World War I in Europe, Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were. A coalition of Jewish and non-Jewish Communists had taken over Russia in the final year of World War I and fear of Jewish/Communist revolution was absolutely rampant all over Europe after the war was over. Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.
Today when we think of European Jews, we think of Anne Frank or Schindler's list. But the fear of Communist revolution formed the entire context for the political meaning of the term "Jew" among the parties fighting for power in 1920s and 1930s Germany. Just as today in the United States of America the word "Muslim” is often used (unfairly) as a synonym for "terrorist", in Weimar Germany the word "Jew" was often used as a synonym for "Communist". This important but often forgotten fact explains a lot about the root causes of the Holocaust.

Q.Rosa Luxembourg was:

A. A German

B. A Jew

C. A Communist

Solution:

The passage clearly states - “Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.” Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 6

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

There is a widespread myth that Hitler had a personal ambition to kill all the Jews in the world. Some go so far as to believe that Hitler's primary motivation in rising to leadership in Germany and starting World War II was to kill the Jews. This is not supported by any part of the historical record, which indicates instead that his overt political motivation was to avenge Germany's defeat in World War I, and that his covert personal motivation was probably to glorify himself.
The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust was all too real, but it was not motivated by Hitler's personal feelings about Jews. Instead, the millions of innocent civilians including women and children who perished in horrifying death camps were the collateral damage of a war that had no mercy for any segment of humanity. The poor Jewish victims of the Holocaust had been left helpless because they lacked the protection of their own nation during an era of violent nationalism. The sickening extremities of Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Treblinka are too massive to be blamed on any single perpetrator, and it's tragic to realize that most of the horror could have been avoided if nations like the United States of America had been willing to take in Jews as refugees during the many years that Nazi bureaucrats tried to arrange their deportation.
The Holocaust happened, but there is no historical basis at all for the idea that Hitler had ever had a master plan to slaughter Jews.
The Nazi movement's most active opposition during the period of Hitler's rise to power were the various German Communist parties, which also strove to overthrow the weak Weimar Republic. In the years after World War I in Europe, Jews were widely considered to be Communists, as indeed they often were. A coalition of Jewish and non-Jewish Communists had taken over Russia in the final year of World War I and fear of Jewish/Communist revolution was absolutely rampant all over Europe after the war was over. Most significantly, there had been an attempted German Communist revolution in 1919, led by two prominent and heroic German Jews, Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Liebknecht.
Today when we think of European Jews, we think of Anne Frank or Schindler's list. But the fear of Communist revolution formed the entire context for the political meaning of the term "Jew" among the parties fighting for power in 1920s and 1930s Germany. Just as today in the United States of America the word "Muslim” is often used (unfairly) as a synonym for "terrorist", in Weimar Germany the word "Jew" was often used as a synonym for "Communist". This important but often forgotten fact explains a lot about the root causes of the Holocaust.

Q.“The unspeakable pathos of the Holocaust” implies 

Solution:

- In the quoted text, “pathos” refers to ‘a feeling evoking pain or misery’, which relates to the loss of life and the agony associated with it. Thus, option 1 is valid implication.

- Option 2 with loss of property wouldn’t hold as much importance as the loss of life.

- Option 3 is a consequence rather than an implication.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 7

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

After the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, the German defence establishment was eager to improve its compromised communications system, and recognised the potential of a signalling device that had originally been made for the business market. Dr. Arthur Scherbius had developed his 'Enigma' machine, capable of transcribing coded information, in the hope of interesting commercial companies in secure communications. In 1923 he set up his Cipher Machines Corporation in Berlin to manufacture this product, and within three years the German navy was producing its own version, followed in 1928 by the army and in 1933 by the air force. Enigma allowed an operator to type in a message, then scramble it by means of three to five notched wheels, or rotors, which displayed different letters of the alphabet. The receiver needed to know the exact settings of these rotors in order to reconstitute the coded text. Over the years the basic machine became more complicated, as German code experts added plugs with electronic circuits. Britain and her allies first understood the problems posed by this machine in 1931, when a German spy, Hans Thilo Schmidt, allowed his French spymasters to photograph stolen Enigma operating manuals, although neither French nor British cryptanalysts could at first make headway in breaking the Enigma cipher. It was only after they had handed over details to the Polish Cipher Bureau that progress was made. Helped by its closer links to the German engineering industry, the Poles managed to reconstruct an Enigma machine, complete with internal wiring, and to read the Wehrmacht's messages between 1933 and 1938.

Q.Why did the German defence establishment become interested in the ‘Enigma’ machine?

Solution:

- Options 1 and 2 are vindicated by “...the German defence establishment was eager to improve its compromised communications system,...'Enigma' machine, capable of transcribing coded information, in the hope of interesting commercial companies in secure communications.”.

- According to the passage, the machine was built to facilitate secure communication within the business market. Secure communication is different from business communication. Eliminate option 3.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 8

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

After the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, the German defence establishment was eager to improve its compromised communications system, and recognised the potential of a signalling device that had originally been made for the business market. Dr Arthur Scherbius had developed his 'Enigma' machine, capable of transcribing coded information, in the hope of interesting commercial companies in secure communications. In 1923 he set up his Cipher Machines Corporation in Berlin to manufacture this product, and within three years the German navy was producing its own version, followed in 1928 by the army and in 1933 by the air force. Enigma allowed an operator to type in a message, then scramble it by means of three to five notched wheels, or rotors, which displayed different letters of the alphabet. The receiver needed to know the exact settings of these rotors in order to reconstitute the coded text. Over the years the basic machine became more complicated, as German code experts added plugs with electronic circuits. Britain and her allies first understood the problems posed by this machine in 1931, when a German spy, Hans Thilo Schmidt, allowed his French spymasters to photograph stolen Enigma operating manuals, although neither French nor British cryptanalysts could at first make headway in breaking the Enigma cipher. It was only after they had handed over details to the Polish Cipher Bureau that progress was made. Helped by its closer links to the German engineering industry, the Poles managed to reconstruct an Enigma machine, complete with internal wiring, and to read the Wehrmacht's messages between 1933 and 1938.

Q.It can be inferred from the passage that:

I. The Enigma machine was useful to the German Navy, Airforce and Army.
II. The German spy was possibly a double agent.
III. The Poles were on Germany's side.

Solution:

- Statement I can be inferred from “In 1923 he set up his Cipher Machines Corporation in Berlin to manufacture this product, and within three years the German navy was producing its own version, followed in 1928 by the army and in 1933 by the airforce.”.

- Statement II can be inferred as the German spy allowed his French spymasters to photograph the operating manuals.

- Statement III is contrary to the data given in the passage as the Poles helped in cracking the Enigma cipher which helped decipher the German army communications. This implies they were not with the Germans but against them.

- Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 9

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.

After the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, the German defence establishment was eager to improve its compromised communications system, and recognised the potential of a signalling device that had originally been made for the business market. Dr Arthur Scherbius had developed his 'Enigma' machine, capable of transcribing coded information, in the hope of interesting commercial companies in secure communications. In 1923 he set up his Cipher Machines Corporation in Berlin to manufacture this product, and within three years the German navy was producing its own version, followed in 1928 by the army and in 1933 by the air force. Enigma allowed an operator to type in a message, then scramble it by means of three to five notched wheels, or rotors, which displayed different letters of the alphabet. The receiver needed to know the exact settings of these rotors in order to reconstitute the coded text. Over the years the basic machine became more complicated, as German code experts added plugs with electronic circuits. Britain and her allies first understood the problems posed by this machine in 1931, when a German spy, Hans Thilo Schmidt, allowed his French spymasters to photograph stolen Enigma operating manuals, although neither French nor British cryptanalysts could at first make headway in breaking the Enigma cipher. It was only after they had handed over details to the Polish Cipher Bureau that progress was made. Helped by its closer links to the German engineering industry, the Poles managed to reconstruct an Enigma machine, complete with internal wiring, and to read the Wehrmacht's messages between 1933 and 1938.

Q.Which among the following most likely helped the Polish Cipher Bureau in deciphering the Enigma code?

Solution:

- The passage mentions photographs of stolen manuals and not actual manuals or machines. Eliminate options 1 and 4.

- Option 3 is eliminated as the German armed forces of the years prior to and during World War II was called Wehrmacht.

- Option 2 can be inferred from “Helped by its closer links to the German engineering industry, the Poles managed to reconstruct an Enigma machine...”.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 10

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

A country where 270 million people live below the 'poverty line', obesity seems to be a distant issue, meant for the rich kids of first world. But India is under siege: junk food, alcohol and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self-destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight.
According to a study published in the noted journal Lancet, India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people. The study titled 'Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' - used data collected by international bodies and organisations in various countries like India over three decades. The US topped the list with 13 percent of the obese people worldwide in 2013, while China and India together accounted for 15 percent of the world's obese population, with 46 million and 30 million obese people, respectively. According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population.
Overweight in adults is categorised as Body Mass Index of 25 kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2 and obesity as Body Mass Index of more than 30 kg/m2. In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 percent of years of life lost, and 3.8 percent of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide, the study said. If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.
With lifestyle disorders forcing more and more people to reel under excess body weight, even relatively younger people are developing joint disorders and knee pain. Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments. Experts say the prevalence of obesity is greater among women than men and is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.

Q.Which of these is not true according to the passage? 

Solution:

Option 1 is stated in the third paragraph - "According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population."

- Option 3 is supported by the second paragraph - "India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people.

- Option 4 is supported by the first paragraph -".... making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight."

- Option 2 is not validated from the passage. Although obesity is said to be prevalent among rich kids around the world, it is not specific to Indians.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 11

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

A country where 270 million people live below the 'poverty line', obesity seems to be a distant issue, meant for the rich kids of first world. But India is under siege: junk food, alcohol, and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self-destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight.
According to a study published in the noted journal Lancet, India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people. The study titled 'Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' - used data collected by international bodies and organisations in various countries like India over three decades. The US topped the list with 13 percent of the obese people worldwide in 2013, while China and India together accounted for 15 percent of the world's obese population, with 46 million and 30 million obese people, respectively. According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population.
Overweight in adults is categorised as Body Mass Index of 25 kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2 and obesity as Body Mass Index of more than 30 kg/m2. In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 percent of years of life lost, and 3.8 percent of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide, the study said. If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.
With lifestyle disorders forcing more and more people to reel under excess body weight, even relatively younger people are developing joint disorders and knee pain. Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments. Experts say the prevalence of obesity is greater among women than men and is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.

Q.Obesity is said to cause all of the following except:

A. Premature deaths

B. Carcinogenic ailments

C. Lifestyle disorders

Solution:

- Option A can be inferred from “In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 per cent of years of life lost...”

- The passage does not talk about obesity resulting in carcinogenic ailments or cancer. Thus, B cannot be inferred from the passage.

- The passage states “Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments.” Hence, C can be inferred from the passage.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 12

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

A country where 270 million people live below the 'poverty line', obesity seems to be a distant issue, meant for the rich kids of first world. But India is under siege: junk food, alcohol and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self-destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight.
According to a study published in the noted journal Lancet, India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people. The study titled 'Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' - used data collected by international bodies and organisations in various countries like India over three decades. The US topped the list with 13 percent of the obese people worldwide in 2013, while China and India together accounted for 15 percent of the world's obese population, with 46 million and 30 million obese people, respectively. According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population.
Overweight in adults is categorised as Body Mass Index of 25 kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2 and obesity as Body Mass Index of more than 30 kg/m2. In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 percent of years of life lost, and 3.8 percent of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide, the study said. If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.
With lifestyle disorders forcing more and more people to reel under excess body weight, even relatively younger people are developing joint disorders and knee pain. Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments. Experts say the prevalence of obesity is greater among women than men and is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.

Q.The passage says that obesity is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.
From the above we can assume that:

Solution:

- The passage does not talk about a correlation between stress and obesity. Hence, option 1 cannot be corroborated

- Option 3 with “nomadic” contradicts the sedentary lifestyle mentioned in the passage. Thus option 3 can be ruled out.

- Option 4 may be a result of obesity or being overweight but not an assumption.

- Option 2 can be logically assumed as young people eating unhealthy food are likely to gain excess weight.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 13

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

A country where 270 million people live below the 'poverty line', obesity seems to be a distant issue, meant for the rich kids of first world. But India is under siege: junk food, alcohol and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self-destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight.
According to a study published in the noted journal Lancet, India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people. The study titled 'Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' - used data collected by international bodies and organisations in various countries like India over three decades. The US topped the list with 13 percent of the obese people worldwide in 2013, while China and India together accounted for 15 percent of the world's obese population, with 46 million and 30 million obese people, respectively. According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population.
Overweight in adults is categorised as Body Mass Index of 25 kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2 and obesity as Body Mass Index of more than 30 kg/m2. In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 percent of years of life lost, and 3.8 percent of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide, the study said. If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.
With lifestyle disorders forcing more and more people to reel under excess body weight, even relatively younger people are developing joint disorders and knee pain. Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments. Experts say the prevalence of obesity is greater among women than men and is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.

Q.Which of these would weaken the precautious stance towards obesity/being overweight? 

Solution:

- Option 1 is a cautious attempt by the English to keep a check on the consumption of sodium and sugar levels. Hence, option 1 can be eliminated.

- Option 2 is definitely a positive step to avoid obesity. It does not weaken the precautious stance towards obesity.
Option 3 gives preference to nutritious products, in this case it refers to dark chocolate.

- In option 4, “bread rolls” are not necessarily considered very healthy, whereas a complete meal is regarded as a healthy choice.
Among the given options, option 4 is the weakest.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 14

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

A country where 270 million people live below the 'poverty line', obesity seems to be a distant issue, meant for the rich kids of first world. But India is under siege: junk food, alcohol and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self-destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight.
According to a study published in the noted journal Lancet, India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people. The study titled 'Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' - used data collected by international bodies and organisations in various countries like India over three decades. The US topped the list with 13 percent of the obese people worldwide in 2013, while China and India together accounted for 15 percent of the world's obese population, with 46 million and 30 million obese people, respectively. According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population.
Overweight in adults is categorised as Body Mass Index of 25 kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2 and obesity as Body Mass Index of more than 30 kg/m2. In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 percent of years of life lost, and 3.8 percent of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide, the study said. If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.
With lifestyle disorders forcing more and more people to reel under excess body weight, even relatively younger people are developing joint disorders and knee pain. Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments. Experts say the prevalence of obesity is greater among women than men and is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.

Q.Which of these is a reason for the increasing obesity rates in India?

Solution:

- The passage states “If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.” This supports option 1.

- Options 2 and 4 may be facts which we know, however they cannot be corroborated from the passage.

- Option 3 also makes for an interesting perspective but it is not supported by the passage.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 15

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

A country where 270 million people live below the 'poverty line', obesity seems to be a distant issue, meant for the rich kids of first world. But India is under siege: junk food, alcohol and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self-destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight.
According to a study published in the noted journal Lancet, India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people. The study titled 'Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' - used data collected by international bodies and organisations in various countries like India over three decades. The US topped the list with 13 percent of the obese people worldwide in 2013, while China and India together accounted for 15 percent of the world's obese population, with 46 million and 30 million obese people, respectively. According to the study, number of overweight and obese people globally increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This is one-third of the world's population.
Overweight in adults is categorised as Body Mass Index of 25 kg/m2 to 30 kg/m2 and obesity as Body Mass Index of more than 30 kg/m2. In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3 to 4 million deaths, 3.9 percent of years of life lost, and 3.8 percent of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide, the study said. If we see the graph of obesity, from 1999 onwards Indians started gaining weight due to urbanisation. There has been gradual economical improvement in our status. The entrance of modern technology and Internet has turned people lazy and stagnant.
With lifestyle disorders forcing more and more people to reel under excess body weight, even relatively younger people are developing joint disorders and knee pain. Excessive weight is associated with a series of health problems, including blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments. Experts say the prevalence of obesity is greater among women than men and is increasing among children and adolescents rapidly.

Q.Which of the following is an irony mentioned in the passage? 

Solution:

- Option 1 is stating a half fact. There is nothing in the passage to confirm whether women work harder than men.

- Option 3 also states something that is not mentioned in the passage. The statistics of the death toll is fabricated and false.

- Option 4 is incorrect as the passage does not give us statistics of the food supply.

- Option 2 is apt and can be validated by the first paragraph. Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 16

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Gender is not an easy conversation to have. It makes people uncomfortable, sometimes even irritable. Both men and women are resistant to talk about gender, or are quick to dismiss the problems of gender. Because thinking of changing the status quo is always uncomfortable.
Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general - but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women. That the problem was not about being human, but specifically about being a female human. For centuries, the world divided human beings into two groups and then proceeded to exclude and oppress one group. It is only fair that the solution to the problem acknowledge that.
Some men feel threatened by the idea of feminism. This comes, I think, from the insecurity triggered by how boys are brought up, how their sense of self-worth is diminished if they are not "naturally" in charge as men.
We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them. We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.
We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves, because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.
In secondary school, a boy and a girl go out, both of them teenagers with meager pocket money. Yet the boy is expected to pay the bills, always, to prove his masculinity. (And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.) What if both boys and girls were raised not to link masculinity and money? What if their attitude was not "the boy has to pay," but rather, "whoever has more should pay." Of course, because of their historical advantage, it is mostly men who will have more today. But if we start raising children differently, then in fifty years, in a hundred years, boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.

Q. According to the passage, what can we say about the “status quo”?

Solution:

- Option 1 contradicts what is stated in the passage.

- Option 2 with “women’ is incorrect, “gender” would be appropriate here.

- Option 3 cannot be corroborated. People may or may not consider gender a pressing issue.

- Option 4 is corroborated with words like “uncomfortable” and “quick to dismiss”. The first paragraph of the passage states - "Gender is not an easy conversation to have... changing the status quo is always uncomfortable." This validates option 4.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 17

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Gender is not an easy conversation to have. It makes people uncomfortable, sometimes even irritable. Both men and women are resistant to talk about gender, or are quick to dismiss the problems of gender. Because thinking of changing the status quo is always uncomfortable.
Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general - but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women. That the problem was not about being human, but specifically about being a female human. For centuries, the world divided human beings into two groups and then proceeded to exclude and oppress one group. It is only fair that the solution to the problem acknowledge that.
Some men feel threatened by the idea of feminism. This comes, I think, from the insecurity triggered by how boys are brought up, how their sense of self-worth is diminished if they are not "naturally" in charge as men.
We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them. We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.
We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.
In secondary school, a boy and a girl go out, both of them teenagers with meager pocket money. Yet the boy is expected to pay the bills, always, to prove his masculinity. (And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.) What if both boys and girls were raised not to link masculinity and money? What if their attitude was not "the boy has to pay," but rather, "whoever has more should pay." Of course, because of their historical advantage, it is mostly men who will have more today. But if we start raising children differently, then in fifty years, in a hundred years, boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.

Q. “And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.” We can assume from the quoted text that: 

Solution:

- Option 1 is not apt as the passage states that both boys and girls receive a meagre amount as pocket money. Even if girls receive a meagre amount of pocket money it does not hold any ground for the boys’ stealing behaviour.

- Option 3 is an incorrect assumption. If both boys and girls are socialized to have the same value, then the quoted text would not hold true.

- Option 4 with “social situations” is not apt. Stealing is an anti-social behaviour. If the quoted text were about “dating”, then option 4 would be apt.

- The quoted text is talking about stealing and how more boys (than girls) are engaging in this behaviour. Thus, it is safe to assume that society expects boys to pay the bills because of which there is an increased pressure on them to obtain money by alternative means.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 18

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Gender is not an easy conversation to have. It makes people uncomfortable, sometimes even irritable. Both men and women are resistant to talk about gender, or are quick to dismiss the problems of gender. Because thinking of changing the status quo is always uncomfortable.
Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general - but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women. That the problem was not about being human, but specifically about being a female human. For centuries, the world divided human beings into two groups and then proceeded to exclude and oppress one group. It is only fair that the solution to the problem acknowledge that.
Some men feel threatened by the idea of feminism. This comes, I think, from the insecurity triggered by how boys are brought up, how their sense of self-worth is diminished if they are not "naturally" in charge as men.
We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them. We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.
We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves, because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.
In secondary school, a boy and a girl go out, both of them teenagers with meager pocket money. Yet the boy is expected to pay the bills, always, to prove his masculinity. (And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.) What if both boys and girls were raised not to link masculinity and money? What if their attitude was not "the boy has to pay," but rather, "whoever has more should pay." Of course, because of their historical advantage, it is mostly men who will have more today. But if we start raising children differently, then in fifty years, in a hundred years, boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.

Q. Which of these is true about “a hard man” that the author talks about?

A. He is perceived to be strong

B. He is weak and vulnerable

C. He conceals his sentiments

Solution:

- The passage states “We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves, because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.” Since he is taught to keep his guards up and not express these emotions or feelings, he is perceived to be strong. This validates statement A and C.

- Statement B is not true as the paragraph states that we as a society teach boys to be afraid of vulnerability and weakness and not that hard men are vulnerable or weak necessarily.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 19

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Gender is not an easy conversation to have. It makes people uncomfortable, sometimes even irritable. Both men and women are resistant to talk about gender, or are quick to dismiss the problems of gender. Because thinking of changing the status quo is always uncomfortable.
Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general - but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women. That the problem was not about being human, but specifically about being a female human. For centuries, the world divided human beings into two groups and then proceeded to exclude and oppress one group. It is only fair that the solution to the problem acknowledge that.
Some men feel threatened by the idea of feminism. This comes, I think, from the insecurity triggered by how boys are brought up, how their sense of self-worth is diminished if they are not "naturally" in charge as men.
We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them. We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.
We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves, because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.
In secondary school, a boy and a girl go out, both of them teenagers with meager pocket money. Yet the boy is expected to pay the bills, always, to prove his masculinity. (And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.) What if both boys and girls were raised not to link masculinity and money? What if their attitude was not "the boy has to pay," but rather, "whoever has more should pay." Of course, because of their historical advantage, it is mostly men who will have more today. But if we start raising children differently, then in fifty years, in a hundred years, boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.

Q.The statement “Boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.”- implies:

Solution:

- The quoted text does not talk about gender discrimination but not having to prove masculinity. Hence, option 1 can be ruled out.

- For option 3 to be a valid implication, the quoted text should have spoken about values or the role of education or socialization.

- Option 4 diverts from the central idea of the quoted text and focuses on feminism instead.

- Option 2 is a valid implication. Masculinity will certainly be redefined if the current status quo changes.

Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 20

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Gender is not an easy conversation to have. It makes people uncomfortable, sometimes even irritable. Both men and women are resistant to talk about gender, or are quick to dismiss the problems of gender. Because thinking of changing the status quo is always uncomfortable.
Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general - but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women. That the problem was not about being human, but specifically about being a female human. For centuries, the world divided human beings into two groups and then proceeded to exclude and oppress one group. It is only fair that the solution to the problem acknowledge that.
Some men feel threatened by the idea of feminism. This comes, I think, from the insecurity triggered by how boys are brought up, how their sense of self-worth is diminished if they are not "naturally" in charge as men.
We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them. We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.
We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.
In secondary school, a boy and a girl go out, both of them teenagers with meager pocket money. Yet the boy is expected to pay the bills, always, to prove his masculinity. (And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.) What if both boys and girls were raised not to link masculinity and money? What if their attitude was not "the boy has to pay," but rather, "whoever has more should pay." Of course, because of their historical advantage, it is mostly men who will have more today. But if we start raising children differently, then in fifty years, in a hundred years, boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.

Q. According to the author, why should we use the word feminist?

Solution:

- Option 1 talks about the present but fails to acknowledge the injustice faced by women in the past. Thus, can be eliminated.

- Option 2 is a fact in terms of a universal truth but doesn't acknowledge the question stem.

- Although option 3 is correct, it does not highlight the need for the use of the word 'feminist'.

- According to the passage, women's issues have long been overshadowed by other human problems, hence there is a need for a word to distinguish the former from the broader term. This is represented well by option 4.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 21

Answer the following question based on the information given below.

Gender is not an easy conversation to have. It makes people uncomfortable, sometimes even irritable. Both men and women are resistant to talk about gender, or are quick to dismiss the problems of gender. Because thinking of changing the status quo is always uncomfortable.
Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general - but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women. That the problem was not about being human, but specifically about being a female human. For centuries, the world divided human beings into two groups and then proceeded to exclude and oppress one group. It is only fair that the solution to the problem acknowledge that.
Some men feel threatened by the idea of feminism. This comes, I think, from the insecurity triggered by how boys are brought up, how their sense of self-worth is diminished if they are not "naturally" in charge as men.
We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them. We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.
We teach boys to be afraid of fear, of weakness, of vulnerability. We teach them to mask their true selves, because they have to be, in Nigerian-speak—a hard man.
In secondary school, a boy and a girl go out, both of them teenagers with meager pocket money. Yet the boy is expected to pay the bills, always, to prove his masculinity. (And we wonder why boys are more likely to steal money from their parents.) What if both boys and girls were raised not to link masculinity and money? What if their attitude was not "the boy has to pay," but rather, "whoever has more should pay." Of course, because of their historical advantage, it is mostly men who will have more today. But if we start raising children differently, then in fifty years, in a hundred years, boys will no longer have the pressure of proving their masculinity by material means.

Q.Which of these statements weakens the author’s views on gender in the passage?

Solution:
  • Option 2 strengthens the author's views about the role of society in one’s self worth and gender identity.
  • Option 3 strengthens the author's views about ow we as a society need to socialize people of both genders in the same way and that achievement is not determined by gender.
  • Option 4 cannot be associated with the author's views.Thus, can be eliminated.
  • Option 1 weakens the author's views expressed in the passage. Gender discrimination very much exists in our society and according to the author, needs to be addressed. Thus, calling it obsolete or redundant would be inappropriate.

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 22

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions.

Choose the most appropriate A deal with the Devil, pact with the Devil or Faustian bargain is a cultural motif widespread in the West. According to traditional Christian belief in witchcraft, the pact is between a person and Satan or any other demon (or demons); the person offers his or her soul in exchange for diabolical favors. Those favors vary by the tale but tend to include youth, knowledge, wealth, or power. Regardless, the bargain is a dangerous one, for the price of the Fiend's service is the wagerer's soul. It was usually thought that the person who had made a pact also promised the demon to kill children or consecrate them to the Devil at the moment of birth (many midwives were accused of this, due to the number of children that died at birth in the Middle Ages and Renaissance), take part in Sabbaths, have relations with demons, and sometimes engender children from a succubus, or incubus in the case of women.
The pact can be oral or written. An oral pact is made by means of invocations, conjurations, or rituals to attract the demon; once the conjurer thinks the demon is present, he asks for the wanted favour and offers his soul in exchange, and no evidence is left of the pact; but according to some witch trials and inquisitions that were performed, even the oral pact left evidence, namely the diabolical mark, an indelible mark where the marked person had been touched by the devil to seal the pact. The mark could be used as a proof to determine that the pact was made. It was also believed that on the spot where the mark was left, the marked person could feel no pain. A written pact consists in the same forms of attracting the demon but includes a written act, usually signed with the conjurer's blood. Forms of these include contracts or simply signing your name into Satan's Red Book.

Q.Which word comes closest to replacing the word “diabolical” in the passage?

Solution:
  • The mean of the word “diabolical” is “having the qualities of a devil; devilish; fiendish; outrageously wicked.” “Hellenic” means “of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the ancient Greeks.”. Eliminate option 4.
  • Option 2 means “in accord with the Bible.” So, eliminate option 2.
  • Option 3 means “obsolete”. So, eliminate option 3.
  • “Infernal” means “hellish; fiendish.” and is closest in meaning to the word "diabolical".

Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 23

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions.

Choose the most appropriate A deal with the Devil, pact with the Devil, or Faustian bargain is a cultural motif widespread in the West. According to traditional Christian belief in witchcraft, the pact is between a person and Satan or any other demon (or demons); the person offers his or her soul in exchange for diabolical favors. Those favors vary by the tale, but tend to include youth, knowledge, wealth, or power. Regardless, the bargain is a dangerous one, for the price of the Fiend's service is the wagerer's soul. It was usually thought that the person who had made a pact also promised the demon to kill children or consecrate them to the Devil at the moment of birth (many midwives were accused of this, due to the number of children that died at birth in the Middle Ages and Renaissance), take part in Sabbaths, have relations with demons, and sometimes engender children from a succubus, or incubus in the case of women.
The pact can be oral or written. An oral pact is made by means of invocations, conjurations, or rituals to attract the demon; once the conjurer thinks the demon is present, he asks for the wanted favour and offers his soul in exchange, and no evidence is left of the pact; but according to some witch trials and inquisitions that were performed, even the oral pact left evidence, namely the diabolical mark, an indelible mark where the marked person had been touched by the devil to seal the pact. The mark could be used as a proof to determine that the pact was made. It was also believed that on the spot where the mark was left, the marked person could feel no pain. A written pact consists in the same forms of attracting the demon, but includes a written act, usually signed with the conjurer's blood. Forms of these include contracts or simply signing your name into Satan's Red Book.

Q.Which of the following isn’t a characteristic of an oral Faustian bargain?

Solution:
  • Option 1 is stated - “An oral pact is made by means of invocations, conjurations, or rituals to attract the demon.”
  • Options 2 and 4 are stated - “according to some witch trials and inquisitions that were performed, even the oral pact left evidence, namely the diabolical mark, an indelible mark where the marked person had been touched by the devil to seal the pact.”
  • Option 3 cannot be associated with the entire process of the 'sealing of the pact'. The ‘sense of pain’ mentioned in the passage is subjective in nature.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 24

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions.

Choose the most appropriate A deal with the Devil, pact with the Devil, or Faustian bargain is a cultural motif widespread in the West. According to traditional Christian belief in witchcraft, the pact is between a person and Satan or any other demon (or demons); the person offers his or her soul in exchange for diabolical favors. Those favors vary by the tale, but tend to include youth, knowledge, wealth, or power. Regardless, the bargain is a dangerous one, for the price of the Fiend's service is the wagerer's soul. It was usually thought that the person who had made a pact also promised the demon to kill children or consecrate them to the Devil at the moment of birth (many midwives were accused of this, due to the number of children that died at birth in the Middle Ages and Renaissance), take part in Sabbaths, have relations with demons, and sometimes engender children from a succubus, or incubus in the case of women.
The pact can be oral or written. An oral pact is made by means of invocations, conjurations, or rituals to attract the demon; once the conjurer thinks the demon is present, he asks for the wanted favour and offers his soul in exchange, and no evidence is left of the pact; but according to some witch trials and inquisitions that were performed, even the oral pact left evidence, namely the diabolical mark, an indelible mark where the marked person had been touched by the devil to seal the pact. The mark could be used as a proof to determine that the pact was made. It was also believed that on the spot where the mark was left, the marked person could feel no pain. A written pact consists in the same forms of attracting the demon, but includes a written act, usually signed with the conjurer's blood. Forms of these include contracts or simply signing your name into Satan's Red Book.

Q.Which of the following is a service the devil performs in a Faustian bargain? 

Solution:
  • Option 1 is wrong as the passage states that the devil’s job is to grant the conjurer whatever he wishes for, in exchange for the “conjurer’s” soul, not the devil’s.
  • Option 2 is wrong as the object of sacrifice is “children” and not just human beings.
  • Option 3 is wrong as the soul is not acquired forcibly, but as a mutually agreed deal.

Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 25

Choose the odd one out from the sentences given below.

1. To be thought of as a spontaneous person is to own a certain kind of devil-may-care cool, to seem open to new experiences.
2. True spontaneity, as Jean-Paul Sartre noted, is also terrifying.
3. Spontaneity is indeed the materialization of the dream of liberty.
4. And spontaneity, it seems, is a virtue that we sorely wish to have ascribed to us but don’t actually want to act out rigorously.


Solution:
  • In the given sequence, statements 2 and 4 take a somewhat speculative stance on spontaneity. Thus, they belong together and can be linked to each other.
  • While statements 1 and 3 throw some positive light on the aspect of spontaneity, statement 3 takes an extremely positive stance on it, which is not substantiated by the other statements in the sequence.

Hence, the correct answer is 3.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 26

Choose the odd one out from the sentences given below.

1. The concepts of heaven and hell recognised moral gradations between individuals and promised the righting of wrongs in a future life.

2. The contingent realities of human existence - that the righteous can suffer and the wicked can prosper - spurred the emergence of rewards and punishments from the undifferentiated Sheol and Hades.

3. Some today think of hell as a morally unsophisticated, pre-modem doctrine that has survived long past its prime, the emergence of hell could be seen as offering, rather than obstructing, ethical nuance.

4. The idea of hell has not gone uncontested, people argued over its duration, with some advocating a temporary instead of eternal hell.


Solution:
  • All of the given statements pertain to the perceptions of heaven and hell over the years. Statement 2 makes for an appropriate introduction since it mentions how a reality where righteous behaviour is not always rewarded and wickedness not always punished, might have triggered the conception of heaven and hell.
  • Statement 1 follows statement 2 since it mentions the “righting of wrongs” in reference to the “contingent realities” mentioned in statement 2.
  • Statement 3 must follow statement 1 since it mentions the contemporary perspective on hell being an ethical construct from the past.
  • Statement 4 does not belong with the given set of statements since it pertains to the experience of being in hell rather than speculating on the existence of the same.

Hence, the correct answer is 4.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 27

Carefully read the statements in the questions below and arrange them in a logical order.

1. Instead, the new organ would grow from the patient’s own extracted cells, thereby circumventing not only the current shortages but also the risk for organ rejection.

2. Presently, a donor is usually required when an organ is transplanted.

3. Growing out of the unmet demand of shortage of donated organs is the work of a group of enthusiastic scientists - they have developed a new method of transplantation that obviates the need for a human donor.

4. The developing technology of extracting a patient's own cells has the potential to completely eliminate the main concerns involved in donor-patient transplants, but for some also raises ethical questions.

5. While organ transplants frequently result in success stories, issues still persist, predominantly the constant shortage of donated organs.


Solution:
  • The sequence details upon how the shortage of donated organs can be addressed through the new technology of transplantation that makes the need for a human donor unnecessary. The sequence briefly explains this technology and the consequences it can lead to.
  • The “ethical questions” mentioned in statement 4 have not been expanded upon in any of the other statements. Thus, it cannot be placed in the middle of the sequence and qualifies as an appropriate concluding statement of the sequence.
  • The insertion of statement 2 after statements 5, 3 and 1 does not make any sense. The entire sequence is about how the problem of donor shortage can be overcome. Thus, to suddenly state that “Presently, a donor is usually required...” does not make sense.Hence, 2 makes for a suitable opening sentence.

    Hence, the correct sequence is 25314.
*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 28

The following question consists of a certain number of sentences. Some sentences are grammatically incorrect or inappropriate. Identify the number of sentences that are grammatically incorrect.

1. Comparison, for example, can be readily made among the parts of the caterpillar and the butterfly, whose story was sketched in the first chapter of this book, widely different though caterpillar and butterfly may appear at a superficial glance.

2. And the survey of variety in form, food, and habit of insect larvae given in the chapter enforce surely the conclusion that the larva is eminently plastic, adaptable, capable of changing so as to suit the most diverse surroundings.

3. In a most suggestive recent discussion on the transformation of insects, Deegener has claimed that the larva must be regarded as the more modified stage.

4. This is because while all the adult’s structures are represented in the larva, even if only as imaginal buds, they are commonly present in the larva, special adaptive organs not found in the imago, for example the pro-legs of caterpillars or the skin-gills of midge-grubs.

5. A certain amount of difficulty may be felt with regard to the theory of divergent evolution between imago and larva, in the case of those insects with complete transformation whose grubs and adults live in much the same conditions.

 


Solution:
  • In a comparison of two things, the preposition ‘between’ is used and not “among”. Therefore, ‘between’ should replace “among” in statement 1.
  • Statement 2 has a subject-verb agreement error. The verb should be ‘enforces’, in line with the “survey” (the subject which is singular).
  • Statement 4 is a slightly difficult one, as it is not easily spotted. In 4, ‘there’ should replace “they”, as ‘there’ (demonstrative) demonstrates the “special adaptive organs” mentioned in the sentence.

The other statements are grammatically correct.
Hence, the correct answer is 3.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 29

The following question consists of a certain number of sentences. Some sentences are grammatically incorrect or inappropriate. Identify the number of sentences that are grammatically incorrect.

1. Their only homes were rude huts which they could put up or tear down at very short notice; and so when they heard of more fertile lands across the mountains to the south, they used to pull up stakes and migrate in a body, never to return.

2. It was always the more savage and uncivilized people who were most likely to migrate.

3. The other tribes were more civilized and peaceful, having gradually turned to trade and agriculture from their former habits of hunting and fighting.

4. Sometimes these more civilized and peace-loving people were able, at their better weapons and superior knowledge of the art of fortifying, to beat back the invasion of the immigrating barbarians.

5. Oftener, though, the rougher, ruder tribes were the victors, and settled down among the people they had conquered, to rule them, doing no work themselves, but forcing the conquered ones to feed and cloth them.


Solution:
  • In Sentence 4, the preposition “at” should be replaced by ‘with’ (able with their better weapons), or ‘because of.
  • Sentence 5 has an error in word usage. In sentence 5, the word should be ‘clothe’ and not “cloth”. ‘Clothe’ means ‘to provide with clothes (the intended meaning here) or be dressed in’.

Hence, the correct answer is 2.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 30

Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.

1. A large male leopard straddled the giraffe, its mouth blood-red.
2. Many animals roam the savannas of the Sabi Sand Game Reserve in South Africa.
3. Sometimes, these animals turn up in unexpected places - such as the young giraffe that game guides found up in a tree, hung over a fork, dead.
4. Apparently, the leopard had hoisted the giraffe several metres up the tree.


Solution:
  • From an initial reading, we get the idea that the paragraph is a narrative. Sentence 2 starts the narrative by talking about the Sabi Sand Reserve in South Africa and the animals present there. Hence, this will be the first sentence of the passage.
  • Sentence 3 continues the narrative and talks about how these animals sometimes are found in unexpected places and then the sentence brings in a dead giraffe hanging on a tree fork. Hence, this will come after Sentence 2.
  • Sentence 1 talks about a leopard-spotted in the vicinity of the giraffe mentioned in Sentence 3, with evidence that it was responsible for killing the giraffe. Hence, this will come after Sentence 3.
  • Sentence 4 makes an apparent conclusion based on sentence 1. Hence it will come after Sentence 1.

    Therefore, the correct order of the sentence is 2314.
*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 31

In this questions below contains a paragraph followed by alternative summaries. Choose the option that best captures the essence of the paragraph.

Thousands of officials from all over the world met for two weeks of difficult talks in Bonn under the United Nations’ climate convention. But they were conscious that even more difficult and probably more important negotiations were under way in Beijing. America’s most senior climate-change officials were meeting their Chinese counterparts. The two countries are by far the world’s biggest emitters of greenhouse gases. They will determine whether a worthwhile global treaty to limit emissions can be concluded as planned in Copenhagen in December. The treaty is to replace the Kyoto protocol, which expires in 2012. Some 180 countries will take part in the negotiations, but many feel that, on this issue more than any other, China and America make up a “G2” that determines the global post-Kyoto agenda.

1. The United Nations’ climate convention may not be able to determine the global post-Kyoto agenda on green house gases unless China and America jointly ratifies it.

2. In 2012, China and America, the two biggest emitters of green house gases have the potential to determine the global post-Kyoto agenda to limit emissions.

3. At the next United Nations’ climate convention, China and America, the two biggest emitters of green house gases, will determine the global post-Kyoto agenda to limit emissions.

4. At the next United Nations’ climate convention, China and America, the two biggest emitters of green house gases, will determine the global post-Kyoto agenda to limit emissions, overriding 180 other nations.


Solution:
  • Option 1 stresses the ‘UN may not be able to aspect unnecessarily which may be implicit in the paragraph, but is not stated explicitly.
  • Option 2 erroneously mentions the year as 2012, the conference is in December (year is unimportant); the Kyoto Protocol expires in 2012.
  • Option 4 is eliminated because of the word ‘overriding’ which cannot be accommodated in the gist as the paragraph does not imply or state it.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 32

From among the options, choose the summary of the passage that is written in the same style as that of the passage.

Asia’s economic dynamism is beginning to find a parallel in the region’s diplomacy, particularly where security is concerned. Indeed, we may now be “present at the creation,” which described the construction of the post-World War II global security order. This time, what is being created is a security order for Asia that reflects its newfound primacy in world affairs, though what that order will ultimately look like remains to be determined.

1. Unlike the security order that emerged post-World War II, the evolving security order of Asia driven by its economic power seems uncertain.

2. Similar to the post-W orld War II security order, a diplomatic global security order is emerging driven by Asia’s economic primacy in world affairs.

3. Similar to the creation of the post-World War II global security order, a new security order for Asia is being driven by its current economic supremacy.

4. The current emergence of an Asian security order similar to the world security order of post World War II seems to have an uncertain future.


Solution:
  • Option 1 distorts the ideas in the passage with “seems uncertain”.
  • In option 2, “a diplomatic global security order is emerging driven by Asia’s...” is incorrect.
  • Option 4 is incorrect because of “ an uncertain future.” All these options have other deficiencies too.
  • Option 3 on the other hand captures the essence without distortion.

Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
QUESTION: 33

Complete the paragraph with the appropriate option.

It has become fashionable in certain smart circles to regard atheism as a sign of superior education, of a more highly evolved civilization, of enlightenment. Recent bestsellers suggest that religious faith is really a sign of backwardness, the mark of primitives stuck in the dark ages who are yet to catch up with scientific reason.____

1. Since I have never had either the benefits or the misfortunes of adhering to any religion, it might smack of hypocrisy for me to defend those who have.

2. Indeed, are there cases where religious faith comes to the rescue even of those who don’t have it?

3. Buddhism, for example, has been a religion in different parts of Asia for many centuries, and, like any other belief, it can be used to justify violent acts.

4. None of these


Solution:

None of the options are related to the paragraph. We will be forcing a relationship between the paragraph and the option, if we choose any of the other options for our answer. Something else may be possible but none of the given options fit.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 34

In questions given below, a part of the sentence is italicised and underlined. Below are given alternatives to the italicised part which may improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative. In case no improvement is needed, option 'D' is the answer.

The workers are hell bent at getting what is due to them.

Solution:

Replace the word hell bent at getting :- hell bent upon getting

hell bent upon getting means :- fully committed to achieving a goal

Therefore , hell bent at getting is replaced by hell bent upon getting in above given sentence .

So , option C is correct answer .

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