English Full Test-1


40 Questions MCQ Test English for CLAT | English Full Test-1


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This mock test of English Full Test-1 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT English Full Test-1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this English Full Test-1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this English Full Test-1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other English Full Test-1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been given in bold and Underlined to help locate them while answering some of the questions.

The union government’s present position vis-à-vis the upcoming United Nations conference on racial and related discrimination world-wide seems to be the following: discuss race please, not a caste; caste is our very own and not at all bad as you think. The gross hypocrisy of that position has been lucidly underscored by Kancha Ilaiah. Explicitly, the world community is to be cheated out of considering the matter on the technicality that caste is not, as a concept, tantamount to a racial category. Internally, however, allowing the issue to be put on agenda at the said conference would, we are patriotically admonished, damage the country’s image. Somehow, India’s ritual beliefs elbow out concrete actualities. Inverted representations, as we know, have often been deployed in human histories as a "balm for the forsaken" – religion being the most persistent of such inversions.

Yet, we would humbly submit that if globalizing our markets are thought good for the ‘national’ pocket, "globalizing our social inequities" might not be so bad for the mass of our people. After all, racism was uniquely institutionalized in South Africa as caste discrimination has been within our society: why then can’t we permit the world community to express itself on the latter with a function of the zeal with which, through the years, we pronounced what on the former?

As to the technically about whether or not caste is admissible into an agenda about race (that the conference is also about ‘related discriminations’ tends to be forgotten), a reputed sociologist has recently argued that where race is a "biological" construct, caste is a "social" one. Having earlier fiercely opposed the implementation of the Mandal Commission Report, the said sociologist is at least to be complemented now for admitting, however tangentially, that caste discrimination is a reality, although, in his view, incompatible with racial discrimination. One would like quickly to offer the hypothesis that biology, in important ways that affect the lives of many millions, is in itself perhaps a social construct. But let us look at the matter in another way.

If it is agreed – as per the position today at which anthropological and allied scientific determinations rest – that the entire race of homo sapiens derived from an original black African female (called ‘Eve’) then one is hard put to understand how, on some subsequent ground, ontological distinctions are to be drawn either between races or castes. Let us also underline the distinction between the supposition that we are all God's children and the rather more substantiated argument about our descent from ‘Eve’, lest both positions are thought to be equally diversionary. It then stands to reason that all subsequent distinctions are, in modern parlance, ‘constructed’ ones, and, like all ideological constructions, attributable to changing equations between knowledge and power among human communities through contested histories here, there, and elsewhere.

This line of thought receives, thankfully, extremely consequential buttress from the findings of the Human Genome Project. Contrary to earlier (chiefly 19th-century colonial) persuasions on the subject of race, as well as, one might add, the somewhat infamous Jensen offerings in the 20th century from America, those findings deny the genetic difference between "races". If anything, they suggest that environmental factors impinge on gene-function, as dialectic seems to unfold between nature and culture. It would thus seem that ‘biology’ as the constitution of pigmentation enters the picture first only as a part of that dialectic. Taken together, the original mother stipulation and the Genome findings ought indeed to furnish ground for human equality across the board, as well as yield policy initiatives towards equitable material dispensations aimed at building a global order where, in Hegel’s stirring formulation, only the rational constitutes the right. Such, sadly, is not the case as every day, fresh arbitrary grounds for discrimination are constructed in the interests of sectional dominance.

Q. When the author writes “globalizing our social inequities”, the reference is to

Solution:

Read these lines "Yet, we would humbly submit that if globalising our markets are thought good for the ‘national’ pocket, globalising our social inequities might not be so bad for the mass of our people. After all, racism was as uniquely institutionalised in South Africa as caste discrimination has been within our society; why then can’t we permit the world community to express itself on the latter with a fraction of the zeal with which, through the years, we pronounced on the former?" The issue at the hand is to openly discuss the social inequities.Hence option A is correct. Option C is incorrect as delimitation means to fix the limits which is nowhere mentioned in the passage

QUESTION: 2

The union government’s present position vis-à-vis the upcoming United Nations conference on racial and related discrimination world-wide seems to be the following: discuss race please, not a caste; caste is our very own and not at all bad as you think. The gross hypocrisy of that position has been lucidly underscored by Kancha Ilaiah. Explicitly, the world community is to be cheated out of considering the matter on the technicality that caste is not, as a concept, tantamount to a racial category. Internally, however, allowing the issue to be put on agenda at the said conference would, we are patriotically admonished, damage the country’s image. Somehow, India’s ritual beliefs elbow out concrete actualities. Inverted representations, as we know, have often been deployed in human histories as a "balm for the forsaken" – religion being the most persistent of such inversions.

Yet, we would humbly submit that if globalizing our markets are thought good for the ‘national’ pocket, "globalizing our social inequities" might not be so bad for the mass of our people. After all, racism was uniquely institutionalized in South Africa as caste discrimination has been within our society: why then can’t we permit the world community to express itself on the latter with a function of the zeal with which, through the years, we pronounced what on the former?

As to the technically about whether or not caste is admissible into an agenda about race (that the conference is also about ‘related discriminations’ tends to be forgotten), a reputed sociologist has recently argued that where race is a "biological" construct, caste is a "social" one. Having earlier fiercely opposed implementation of the Mandal Commission Report, the said sociologist is at least to be complemented now for admitting, however tangentially, that caste discrimination is a reality, although, in his view, incompatible with racial discrimination. One would like quickly to offer the hypothesis that biology, in important ways that affect the lives of many millions, is in itself perhaps a social construct. But let us look at the matter in another way.

If it is agreed – as per the position today at which anthropological and allied scientific determinations rest – that the entire race of homo sapiens derived from an original black African female (called ‘Eve’) then one is hard put to understand how, on some subsequent ground, ontological distinctions are to be drawn either between races or castes. Let us also underline the distinction between the supposition that we are all God's children and the rather more substantiated argument about our descent from ‘Eve’, lest both positions are thought to be equally diversionary. It then stands to reason that all subsequent distinctions are, in modern parlance, ‘constructed’ ones, and, like all ideological constructions, attributable to changing equations between knowledge and power among human communities through contested histories here, there, and elsewhere.

This line of thought receives, thankfully, extremely consequential buttress from the findings of the Human Genome Project. Contrary to earlier (chiefly 19th-century colonial) persuasions on the subject of race, as well as, one might add, the somewhat infamous Jensen offerings in the 20th century from America, those findings deny the genetic difference between "races". If anything, they suggest that environmental factors impinge on gene-function, as dialectic seems to unfold between nature and culture. It would thus seem that ‘biology’ as the constitution of pigmentation enters the picture first only as a part of that dialectic. Taken together, the original mother stipulation and the Genome findings ought indeed to furnish ground for human equality across the board, as well as yield policy initiatives towards equitable material dispensations aimed at building a global order where, in Hegel’s stirring formulation, only the rational constitutes the right. Such, sadly, is not the case as every day, fresh arbitrary grounds for discrimination are constructed in the interests of sectional dominance.

Q. According to the author, “inverted representations as a balm for the forsaken”

Solution:

The Answer is option c

In the given passage, in the following santanza it is clear that the Answer is option C

Inverted representations, as we know, have often been deployed in human histories as a "balm for the forsaken" – religion being the most persistent of such inversions.

QUESTION: 3

The union government’s present position vis-à-vis the upcoming United Nations conference on racial and related discrimination world-wide seems to be the following: discuss race please, not a caste; caste is our very own and not at all bad as you think. The gross hypocrisy of that position has been lucidly underscored by Kancha Ilaiah. Explicitly, the world community is to be cheated out of considering the matter on the technicality that caste is not, as a concept, tantamount to a racial category. Internally, however, allowing the issue to be put on agenda at the said conference would, we are patriotically admonished, damage the country’s image. Somehow, India’s ritual beliefs elbow out concrete actualities. Inverted representations, as we know, have often been deployed in human histories as a "balm for the forsaken" – religion being the most persistent of such inversions.

Yet, we would humbly submit that if globalizing our markets are thought good for the ‘national’ pocket, "globalizing our social inequities" might not be so bad for the mass of our people. After all, racism was uniquely institutionalized in South Africa as caste discrimination has been within our society: why then can’t we permit the world community to express itself on the latter with a function of the zeal with which, through the years, we pronounced what on the former?

As to the technically about whether or not caste is admissible into an agenda about race (that the conference is also about ‘related discriminations’ tends to be forgotten), a reputed sociologist has recently argued that where race is a "biological" construct, caste is a "social" one. Having earlier fiercely opposed the implementation of the Mandal Commission Report, the said sociologist is at least to be complemented now for admitting, however tangentially, that caste discrimination is a reality, although, in his view, incompatible with racial discrimination. One would like quickly to offer the hypothesis that biology, in important ways that affect the lives of many millions, is in itself perhaps a social construct. But let us look at the matter in another way.

If it is agreed – as per the position today at which anthropological and allied scientific determinations rest – that the entire race of homo sapiens derived from an original black African female (called ‘Eve’) then one is hard put to understand how, on some subsequent ground, ontological distinctions are to be drawn either between races or castes. Let us also underline the distinction between the supposition that we are all God's children and the rather more substantiated argument about our descent from ‘Eve’, lest both positions are thought to be equally diversionary. It then stands to reason that all subsequent distinctions are, in modern parlance, ‘constructed’ ones, and, like all ideological constructions, attributable to changing equations between knowledge and power among human communities through contested histories here, there, and elsewhere.

This line of thought receives, thankfully, extremely consequential buttress from the findings of the Human Genome Project. Contrary to earlier (chiefly 19th-century colonial) persuasions on the subject of race, as well as, one might add, the somewhat infamous Jensen offerings in the 20th century from America, those findings deny the genetic difference between "races". If anything, they suggest that environmental factors impinge on gene-function, as dialectic seems to unfold between nature and culture. It would thus seem that ‘biology’ as the constitution of pigmentation enters the picture first only as a part of that dialectic. Taken together, the original mother stipulation and the Genome findings ought indeed to furnish ground for human equality across the board, as well as yield policy initiatives towards equitable material dispensations aimed at building a global order where, in Hegel’s stirring formulation, only the rational constitutes the right. Such, sadly, is not the case as every day, fresh arbitrary grounds for discrimination are constructed in the interests of sectional dominance.

Q.

Based on the passage, which broad areas unambiguously fall under the purview of the UN conference being discussed?
A) Racial prejudice
B) Racial pride
C) Discrimination, racial or otherwise
D) Caste-related discrimination
E) Race-related discrimination

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

The union government’s present position vis-à-vis the upcoming United Nations conference on racial and related discrimination world-wide seems to be the following: discuss race please, not a caste; caste is our very own and not at all bad as you think. The gross hypocrisy of that position has been lucidly underscored by Kancha Ilaiah. Explicitly, the world community is to be cheated out of considering the matter on the technicality that caste is not, as a concept, tantamount to a racial category. Internally, however, allowing the issue to be put on agenda at the said conference would, we are patriotically admonished, damage the country’s image. Somehow, India’s ritual beliefs elbow out concrete actualities. Inverted representations, as we know, have often been deployed in human histories as a "balm for the forsaken" – religion being the most persistent of such inversions.

Yet, we would humbly submit that if globalizing our markets are thought good for the ‘national’ pocket, "globalizing our social inequities" might not be so bad for the mass of our people. After all, racism was uniquely institutionalized in South Africa as caste discrimination has been within our society: why then can’t we permit the world community to express itself on the latter with a function of the zeal with which, through the years, we pronounced what on the former?

As to the technically about whether or not caste is admissible into an agenda about race (that the conference is also about ‘related discriminations’ tends to be forgotten), a reputed sociologist has recently argued that where race is a "biological" construct, caste is a "social" one. Having earlier fiercely opposed the implementation of the Mandal Commission Report, the said sociologist is at least to be complemented now for admitting, however tangentially, that caste discrimination is a reality, although, in his view, incompatible with racial discrimination. One would like quickly to offer the hypothesis that biology, in important ways that affect the lives of many millions, is in itself perhaps a social construct. But let us look at the matter in another way.

If it is agreed – as per the position today at which anthropological and allied scientific determinations rest – that the entire race of homo sapiens derived from an original black African female (called ‘Eve’) then one is hard put to understand how, on some subsequent ground, ontological distinctions are to be drawn either between races or castes. Let us also underline the distinction between the supposition that we are all God's children and the rather more substantiated argument about our descent from ‘Eve’, lest both positions are thought to be equally diversionary. It then stands to reason that all subsequent distinctions are, in modern parlance, ‘constructed’ ones, and, like all ideological constructions, attributable to changing equations between knowledge and power among human communities through contested histories here, there, and elsewhere.

This line of thought receives, thankfully, extremely consequential buttress from the findings of the Human Genome Project. Contrary to earlier (chiefly 19th-century colonial) persuasions on the subject of race, as well as, one might add, the somewhat infamous Jensen offerings in the 20th century from America, those findings deny the genetic difference between "races". If anything, they suggest that environmental factors impinge on gene-function, as dialectic seems to unfold between nature and culture. It would thus seem that ‘biology’ as the constitution of pigmentation enters the picture first only as a part of that dialectic. Taken together, the original mother stipulation and the Genome findings ought indeed to furnish ground for human equality across the board, as well as yield policy initiatives towards equitable material dispensations aimed at building a global order where, in Hegel’s stirring formulation, only the rational constitutes the right. Such, sadly, is not the case as every day, fresh arbitrary grounds for discrimination are constructed in the interests of sectional dominance.
 

Q.

According to the author, the sociologist who argued that race is a ‘biological’ construct and caste is a ‘social’ one

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

The union government’s present position vis-à-vis the upcoming United Nations conference on racial and related discrimination world-wide seems to be the following: discuss race please, not a caste; caste is our very own and not at all bad as you think. The gross hypocrisy of that position has been lucidly underscored by Kancha Ilaiah. Explicitly, the world community is to be cheated out of considering the matter on the technicality that caste is not, as a concept, tantamount to a racial category. Internally, however, allowing the issue to be put on agenda at the said conference would, we are patriotically admonished, damage the country’s image. Somehow, India’s ritual beliefs elbow out concrete actualities. Inverted representations, as we know, have often been deployed in human histories as a "balm for the forsaken" – religion being the most persistent of such inversions.

Yet, we would humbly submit that if globalizing our markets are thought good for the ‘national’ pocket, "globalizing our social inequities" might not be so bad for the mass of our people. After all, racism was uniquely institutionalized in South Africa as caste discrimination has been within our society: why then can’t we permit the world community to express itself on the latter with a function of the zeal with which, through the years, we pronounced what on the former?

As to the technically about whether or not caste is admissible into an agenda about race (that the conference is also about ‘related discriminations’ tends to be forgotten), a reputed sociologist has recently argued that where race is a "biological" construct, caste is a "social" one. Having earlier fiercely opposed the implementation of the Mandal Commission Report, the said sociologist is at least to be complemented now for admitting, however tangentially, that caste discrimination is a reality, although, in his view, incompatible with racial discrimination. One would like quickly to offer the hypothesis that biology, in important ways that affect the lives of many millions, is in itself perhaps a social construct. But let us look at the matter in another way.

If it is agreed – as per the position today at which anthropological and allied scientific determinations rest – that the entire race of homo sapiens derived from an original black African female (called ‘Eve’) then one is hard put to understand how, on some subsequent ground, ontological distinctions are to be drawn either between races or castes. Let us also underline the distinction between the supposition that we are all God's children and the rather more substantiated argument about our descent from ‘Eve’, lest both positions are thought to be equally diversionary. It then stands to reason that all subsequent distinctions are, in modern parlance, ‘constructed’ ones, and, like all ideological constructions, attributable to changing equations between knowledge and power among human communities through contested histories here, there, and elsewhere.

This line of thought receives, thankfully, extremely consequential buttress from the findings of the Human Genome Project. Contrary to earlier (chiefly 19th-century colonial) persuasions on the subject of race, as well as, one might add, the somewhat infamous Jensen offerings in the 20th century from America, those findings deny the genetic difference between "races". If anything, they suggest that environmental factors impinge on gene-function, as dialectic seems to unfold between nature and culture. It would thus seem that ‘biology’ as the constitution of pigmentation enters the picture first only as a part of that dialectic. Taken together, the original mother stipulation and the Genome findings ought indeed to furnish ground for human equality across the board, as well as yield policy initiatives towards equitable material dispensations aimed at building a global order where, in Hegel’s stirring formulation, only the rational constitutes the right. Such, sadly, is not the case as every day, fresh arbitrary grounds for discrimination are constructed in the interests of sectional dominance.

Q.

An important message in the passage, if one accepts a dialectic between nature and culture, is that

Solution:

Option A is out . Option D is also out as caste is completely social construct. Out of B and C , B can be inferred from the last part of the passage. 

QUESTION: 6

Directions (Q. 6 - 15): In the following passage there are blanks each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below, four of five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.
Find out the appropriate words for No. 6

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Find out the appropriate words for No. 7

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Find out the appropriate words for No. 8

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Find out the appropriate words for No. 9

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Find out the appropriate words for No. 10

Q.

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Find out the appropriate words for No. 11

Q.

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Find out the appropriate words for No. 12

Q.

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Find out the appropriate words for No. 13

Q.

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Find out the appropriate words for No. 14

Q.

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Find out the appropriate words for No. 15

Q.

The Earth is one of the known planets that circle the sun. In (6)                     times, the men who studied the (7)                noticed that while certain heavenly (8)              seemed fixed in the sky, others seemed to (9)                 about. The latter they named planets or wanderers (10)             astronomers have discovered that the four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus (11)                Neptune, are surrounded by poisonous gases and are so (12)                 that any living thing attempting to (13)                one them would instantly be frozen to death. Of the five remaining (14)                   Venus most closely  (15)                the Earth in size.

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Directions (Q. 16 - 20): Fill in the blanks with Appropriate Words

How many of the books published each year in India make a …………… contribution towards improving men’s ………..with each other?

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Due to ..... rainfall this year they had to ......... cut in water supply

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

The ………….man treated everyone in a …….. manner

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Mr. Johnson …………. a boat and ………… across the bay

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

Those suffering from glaucoma find that their …….. vision is ……… and that they can no longer see objects not directly in front of them

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Directions (Q. 21 - 25): In the following sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in underline letter. For each underline part, four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the underline part.
The import of technology as an alternative to "indigenous" technology has not been discussed fully.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

The "ascending" temperature in many parts of the world confirms global warming which is an environmental hazard.

Solution:

Use the process of elimination when in confusion, or the process of substitution when in further doubt.
The mounting temperature in many parts- incorrect.The shooting temperature in many parts- has a chance, but shooting indicates rapid, sudden growth and that is not true in the context of temperature.The falling temperature in many parts confirms global- contradictory. The rising temperature in many parts confirms global- correct.Rising indicates steady growth, like that of temperature.

QUESTION: 23

Reading fiction is an "absorbing", creative and entertaining hobby.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The data is "misleading".

Solution:

In statistics, a misleading graph, also known as a distorted graph, is a graph that misrepresents data, constituting a misuse of statistics and with the result that an incorrect conclusion may be derived from it. Graphs may be misleading through being excessively complex or poorly constructed.

QUESTION: 25

Graduation day is a "momentous" day for most students.

Solution:

Melancholy and Hectic cant be the answer as they mean sadness and being busy respectively. Momentous means being very important and since its graduation the answer is important.

QUESTION: 26

Directions (Q. 26 - 30): Fill in the Blanks

Some students are …….. and want to take only the courses for which they see immediate value.

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

It was a ……………. moment for Ravi when he finally gathered up his courage and told Aruna that he loved her.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

The …….. is working on wood.

Solution:

An artist creates something whose only value is aesthetic. An artisan creates something that is functional bread, furniture, etc. but attempts to imbue some element of artistry or aesthetics in his craft

QUESTION: 29

In Spite of some ………, Ashish is a good sportsman.

Solution:

A misdemeanor is a criminal offense that is less serious than a felony and more serious than an infraction. Misdemeanors are generally punishable by a fine and incarceration in a local county jail, unlike infractions which impose no jail time.

QUESTION: 30

We must ……….. students on subjects like health and sanitation besides the usual subjects.

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Directions (Q. 31 - 35): In each of the following sentence, five options are given. You are required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the context of the correct usage of standard written English. While doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.

Q. If he was to decide to go to college, one would recommend that he plan go to IIM, Ahmedabad.

Solution:

Here we are talking about a hypothetical situation and hence the use of was is incorrect. Was is used when we talk about a definite event. We always use "were" with "if". 

QUESTION: 32

Except for you and I, everyone brought a present for the little birthday boy.

Solution:

The correct answer corrects the incorrect use of subjective pronoun ‘I’ in the other sentences. After ‘except’ we use objective case pronouns.

QUESTION: 33

When one reads the Hindi literature of the twentieth century, you find a striking contrast between the writings of Munshi Premchand and later day written of popular Hindi fiction.

Solution:

The answer is D ill tell you why the rest 3 are incorrect

Option A = when we use ONE as the subject then we can't use YOU afterwards in the sentence due to parallelism

Option B = When we use YOU for the subject we cant use ONE again due to the same reason

Option C = Incorrect use of HE, we need to use ONE again parallelism 

Option D starts with ONE and use ONE afterwards also. 

QUESTION: 34

Because of his tennis elbow injury, Limba Ram has not and possibly never will be able to pick up the bat again.

Solution:

The omission of the past participle ‘been’ is corrected in Choice D.

QUESTION: 35

Had he realized how close he was to failing, he would not have gone to the party.

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Directions (36-40): In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.

Q. The people in a theatre or cinema

Solution:

A movie theater or movie theatre is a place where movies are shown on a big screen. People or "patrons" (the audience) watch movies, usually in chairs inside an auditorium. A movie theatre is sometimes called a cinema.

QUESTION: 37

To examine one’s own thoughts and feelings

Solution:

Introspection is the examination of one's own conscious thoughts and feelings. In psychology, the process of introspection relies exclusively on observation of one's mental state, while in a spiritual context it may refer to the examination of one's soul. 

QUESTION: 38

A man who operates on sick people

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Woman who offers the use of her body for sexual intercourse to anyone who will pay for this

Solution:

Prostitution is the business or practice of engaging in sexual activity in exchange for payment. Prostitution is sometimes described as sexual services, commercial sex or, colloquially, hooking. It is sometimes referred to euphemistically as "the world's oldest profession" in the English-speaking world.

QUESTION: 40

A book containing summarized information on all branches of knowledge

Solution:

Encyclopedia-a book or set of books giving information on many subjects or on many aspects of one subject and typically arranged alphabetically.

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