General Questions & Current Affairs - 2


30 Questions MCQ Test Mock Test Series for CLAT 2022 | General Questions & Current Affairs - 2


Description
This mock test of General Questions & Current Affairs - 2 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 30 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT General Questions & Current Affairs - 2 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this General Questions & Current Affairs - 2 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this General Questions & Current Affairs - 2 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other General Questions & Current Affairs - 2 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Passage - 1

Tiny zircon crystals in {1} are helping scientists unlock the ancient history of our planet's first {2}, which disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago.
And the crystals show that this field was a lot more powerful than anyone believed. That, in turn, could help answer a question about why life emerged on Earth. Those tiny, old crystals are locked in rocks that date to well over half a billion years ago.
At the time, tiny zircon magnetic particles floated in the molten rock. But as that rock cooled, the particles, which aligned to the {2} orientation at the time, locked into place. And those particles still sit in a pose suggesting that they were influenced by a much more powerful {2} than scientists had assumed, a new study reveals.
Earth's {2} is generated by the planet's solid iron inner core spinning in a liquid-iron outer core. Extending far beyond our atmosphere, this field protects the planet from dangerous particles blasting through space, such as solar wind and cosmic rays. But because its visible effects on the planet's surface are so minimal, studying the field's long history is difficult.
However, this history is important for understanding the future of our own planet and other planets in the universe. We know our planet has had a strong magnetic shield for a long time, because it kept its surface water and sprouted life. Otherwise, cosmic radiation would have blasted both life and water off the surface long ago.
In that scenario, Earth would look a lot like Mars, where the old {2} collapsed as the planet cooled and its core stopped spinning, according to a statement from the researchers.

Q. Tiny zircon crystals in {1} are helping scientists unlock the ancient history of our planet's first {2}, which disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago. Which of the following countries is redacted with {1} in the above passage?

Solution:

Tiny crystals in Australia are helping scientists unlock the ancient history of our planet's first magnetic field, which disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago.

QUESTION: 2

Passage - 1

Tiny zircon crystals in {1} are helping scientists unlock the ancient history of our planet's first {2}, which disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago.
And the crystals show that this field was a lot more powerful than anyone believed. That, in turn, could help answer a question about why life emerged on Earth. Those tiny, old crystals are locked in rocks that date to well over half a billion years ago.
At the time, tiny zircon magnetic particles floated in the molten rock. But as that rock cooled, the particles, which aligned to the {2} orientation at the time, locked into place. And those particles still sit in a pose suggesting that they were influenced by a much more powerful {2} than scientists had assumed, a new study reveals.
Earth's {2} is generated by the planet's solid iron inner core spinning in a liquid-iron outer core. Extending far beyond our atmosphere, this field protects the planet from dangerous particles blasting through space, such as solar wind and cosmic rays. But because its visible effects on the planet's surface are so minimal, studying the field's long history is difficult.
However, this history is important for understanding the future of our own planet and other planets in the universe. We know our planet has had a strong magnetic shield for a long time, because it kept its surface water and sprouted life. Otherwise, cosmic radiation would have blasted both life and water off the surface long ago.
In that scenario, Earth would look a lot like Mars, where the old {2} collapsed as the planet cooled and its core stopped spinning, according to a statement from the researchers.

Q. Who among following discovered the magnetic fields are produced by moving charges (current)?

Solution:

A French scientist named Andre-Marie Ampere studied the relationship between electricity and magnetism. He discovered that magnetic fields are produced by moving charges (current).

QUESTION: 3

Passage - 1

Tiny zircon crystals in {1} are helping scientists unlock the ancient history of our planet's first {2}, which disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago.
And the crystals show that this field was a lot more powerful than anyone believed. That, in turn, could help answer a question about why life emerged on Earth. Those tiny, old crystals are locked in rocks that date to well over half a billion years ago.
At the time, tiny zircon magnetic particles floated in the molten rock. But as that rock cooled, the particles, which aligned to the {2} orientation at the time, locked into place. And those particles still sit in a pose suggesting that they were influenced by a much more powerful {2} than scientists had assumed, a new study reveals.
Earth's {2} is generated by the planet's solid iron inner core spinning in a liquid-iron outer core. Extending far beyond our atmosphere, this field protects the planet from dangerous particles blasting through space, such as solar wind and cosmic rays. But because its visible effects on the planet's surface are so minimal, studying the field's long history is difficult.
However, this history is important for understanding the future of our own planet and other planets in the universe. We know our planet has had a strong magnetic shield for a long time, because it kept its surface water and sprouted life. Otherwise, cosmic radiation would have blasted both life and water off the surface long ago.
In that scenario, Earth would look a lot like Mars, where the old {2} collapsed as the planet cooled and its core stopped spinning, according to a statement from the researchers.

Q. The White Zircon is also known as:

Solution:

Top Quality flawless white zircons that are graded as Top Colorless Flawless zircons are also referred to as "Matura Diamond" for their similarity in beauty and shine with Diamonds.

QUESTION: 4

Passage - 1

Tiny zircon crystals in {1} are helping scientists unlock the ancient history of our planet's first {2}, which disappeared hundreds of millions of years ago.
And the crystals show that this field was a lot more powerful than anyone believed. That, in turn, could help answer a question about why life emerged on Earth. Those tiny, old crystals are locked in rocks that date to well over half a billion years ago.
At the time, tiny zircon magnetic particles floated in the molten rock. But as that rock cooled, the particles, which aligned to the {2} orientation at the time, locked into place. And those particles still sit in a pose suggesting that they were influenced by a much more powerful {2} than scientists had assumed, a new study reveals.
Earth's {2} is generated by the planet's solid iron inner core spinning in a liquid-iron outer core. Extending far beyond our atmosphere, this field protects the planet from dangerous particles blasting through space, such as solar wind and cosmic rays. But because its visible effects on the planet's surface are so minimal, studying the field's long history is difficult.
However, this history is important for understanding the future of our own planet and other planets in the universe. We know our planet has had a strong magnetic shield for a long time, because it kept its surface water and sprouted life. Otherwise, cosmic radiation would have blasted both life and water off the surface long ago.
In that scenario, Earth would look a lot like Mars, where the old {2} collapsed as the planet cooled and its core stopped spinning, according to a statement from the researchers.

Q. Cosmic rays are characterized as:

Solution:

Cosmic rays are high-energy protons and atomic nuclei which move through space at nearly the speed of light. They originate from the sun, from outside of the solar system, and from distant galaxies.

QUESTION: 5

Passage - 2

The {1} launched India's first model sports village {2} program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the {3}for the ambitious {2} plan.
Under the {2} program, {1} in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in the twin villages.
This will be carried out by distributing free booklets, sports magazines and books that will provide the villagers with basic knowledge. All verandahs, courtyards will be developed as primary sports ground management.
One hour every day from 4pm-5pm will be the designated time to play sports. {1} will also provide all Olympic related sports equipment to every child in every house and talent hunt will be carried with the help of several inter and intra village tournaments among other things.
"When we went to the villages to talk about sports and depression, sports and labour management, we found out that people there dont know what is sports. That's how the idea of sport literacy and culture came into the picture,".
Javelin thrower Devendra Jhajharia, who was present during the launch, said: "I like the concept of working in the rural sector. Because if we see, 80 per cent of India's Olympic medallist have come from the villages. Talent is in plenty in villages but facilities are less." "This will develop a sports culture in the country and also send out a message that India is working on the sports sector," he added.

Q. What is the name of the Indian institute which launched the India's first model sports village {2} program redacted with {1} in the above passage?

Solution:

The Institute of management and technology IMT Ghaziabad launched the India's first model sports village (Adarsh Khel gram) program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the Western Uttar Pradesh for the ambitious Adarsh Khel gram plan.

QUESTION: 6

Passage - 2

The {1} launched India's first model sports village {2} program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the {3}for the ambitious {2} plan.
Under the {2} program, {1} in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in the twin villages.
This will be carried out by distributing free booklets, sports magazines and books that will provide the villagers with basic knowledge. All verandahs, courtyards will be developed as primary sports ground management.
One hour every day from 4pm-5pm will be the designated time to play sports. {1} will also provide all Olympic related sports equipment to every child in every house and talent hunt will be carried with the help of several inter and intra village tournaments among other things.
"When we went to the villages to talk about sports and depression, sports and labour management, we found out that people there dont know what is sports. That's how the idea of sport literacy and culture came into the picture,".
Javelin thrower Devendra Jhajharia, who was present during the launch, said: "I like the concept of working in the rural sector. Because if we see, 80 per cent of India's Olympic medallist have come from the villages. Talent is in plenty in villages but facilities are less." "This will develop a sports culture in the country and also send out a message that India is working on the sports sector," he added.

Q. Who is the only Olympic medalist to serve as the Minister of Youth Affairs and Sports of India?

Solution:

Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore is the first sportsperson to become sports minister.

QUESTION: 7

Passage - 2

The {1} launched India's first model sports village {2} program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the {3}for the ambitious {2} plan.
Under the {2} program, {1} in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in the twin villages.
This will be carried out by distributing free booklets, sports magazines and books that will provide the villagers with basic knowledge. All verandahs, courtyards will be developed as primary sports ground management.
One hour every day from 4pm-5pm will be the designated time to play sports. {1} will also provide all Olympic related sports equipment to every child in every house and talent hunt will be carried with the help of several inter and intra village tournaments among other things.
"When we went to the villages to talk about sports and depression, sports and labour management, we found out that people there dont know what is sports. That's how the idea of sport literacy and culture came into the picture,".
Javelin thrower Devendra Jhajharia, who was present during the launch, said: "I like the concept of working in the rural sector. Because if we see, 80 per cent of India's Olympic medallist have come from the villages. Talent is in plenty in villages but facilities are less." "This will develop a sports culture in the country and also send out a message that India is working on the sports sector," he added.

Q. Under the {2} program, {1} in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in India's first model sports village. Name the program redacted with {2} in the above passage.

Solution:

Under the 'Adarsh Khel Gram' program, Institute of Management and Technology IMT Ghaziabad in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in the twin villages.

QUESTION: 8

Passage - 2

The {1} launched India's first model sports village {2} program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the {3}for the ambitious {2} plan.
Under the {2} program, {1} in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in the twin villages.
This will be carried out by distributing free booklets, sports magazines and books that will provide the villagers with basic knowledge. All verandahs, courtyards will be developed as primary sports ground management.
One hour every day from 4pm-5pm will be the designated time to play sports. {1} will also provide all Olympic related sports equipment to every child in every house and talent hunt will be carried with the help of several inter and intra village tournaments among other things.
"When we went to the villages to talk about sports and depression, sports and labour management, we found out that people there dont know what is sports. That's how the idea of sport literacy and culture came into the picture,".
Javelin thrower Devendra Jhajharia, who was present during the launch, said: "I like the concept of working in the rural sector. Because if we see, 80 per cent of India's Olympic medallist have come from the villages. Talent is in plenty in villages but facilities are less." "This will develop a sports culture in the country and also send out a message that India is working on the sports sector," he added.

Q. The {1} launched India's first model sports village {2} program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in {3} for the ambitious {2} plan. Which of the following Indian states is redacted with {3} in the above passage?

Solution:

The Institute of Management and Technology IMT Ghaziabad launched India's first model sports village (Adarsh Khel gram) program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the Uttar Pradesh for the ambitious Adarsh Khel gram plan.

QUESTION: 9

Passage - 2

The {1} launched India's first model sports village {2} program and picked up Bahadarpur and Khedi-Viran villages in the {3}for the ambitious {2} plan.
Under the {2} program, {1} in association with NGO 'Sports: A Way of Life', will evolve sports culture and increase sports literacy in the twin villages.
This will be carried out by distributing free booklets, sports magazines and books that will provide the villagers with basic knowledge. All verandahs, courtyards will be developed as primary sports ground management.
One hour every day from 4pm-5pm will be the designated time to play sports. {1} will also provide all Olympic related sports equipment to every child in every house and talent hunt will be carried with the help of several inter and intra village tournaments among other things.
"When we went to the villages to talk about sports and depression, sports and labour management, we found out that people there dont know what is sports. That's how the idea of sport literacy and culture came into the picture,".
Javelin thrower Devendra Jhajharia, who was present during the launch, said: "I like the concept of working in the rural sector. Because if we see, 80 per cent of India's Olympic medallist have come from the villages. Talent is in plenty in villages but facilities are less." "This will develop a sports culture in the country and also send out a message that India is working on the sports sector," he added.

Q. Name the first woman sportsperson to be decorated with the Padma Vibhushan in 2020.

Solution:

The first woman sportsperson to be decorated with the Padma Vibhushan is celebrated boxer MC Mary Kom.

QUESTION: 10

Passage - 3

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the [1 ] massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar. On April 13, 2019, the then British Prime Minister Theresa May described the [1 ] massacre on April 13, 1919 as a "shameful scar" on the British Indian history. She, however, stopped short of a formal apology demanded by a cross-section of British parliamentarians in the previous debates.
[1] massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the [1], which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. The [2] pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face. Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short. Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets. Eyewitnesses described the aftermath saying that heaps of dead bodies lay there, some on their backs and some with their faces upturned.

Q. On April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Which of the following massacres has been redacted with [1] in the passage above?

Solution:

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar.

QUESTION: 11

Passage - 3

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the [1 ] massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar. On April 13, 2019, the then British Prime Minister Theresa May described the [1 ] massacre on April 13, 1919 as a "shameful scar" on the British Indian history. She, however, stopped short of a formal apology demanded by a cross-section of British parliamentarians in the previous debates.
[1] massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the [1], which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. The [2] pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face. Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short. Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets. Eyewitnesses described the aftermath saying that heaps of dead bodies lay there, some on their backs and some with their faces upturned.

Q. At the [1], a large gathering of people with a majority of Sikhs had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. Which one of the following festivals has been redacted with [2] in the passage above?

Solution:

Jallianwala Bagh massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the Jallianwala Bagh, which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate Baisakhi, the Punjabi harvest festival.

QUESTION: 12

Passage - 3

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the [1 ] massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar. On April 13, 2019, the then British Prime Minister Theresa May described the [1 ] massacre on April 13, 1919 as a "shameful scar" on the British Indian history. She, however, stopped short of a formal apology demanded by a cross-section of British parliamentarians in the previous debates.
[1] massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the [1], which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. The [2] pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face. Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short. Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets. Eyewitnesses described the aftermath saying that heaps of dead bodies lay there, some on their backs and some with their faces upturned.

Q. At the [1], People had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. Which one of the following acts has been redacted with [3] in the passage above?

Solution:

Jallianwala Bagh massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the Jallianwala Bagh, which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate Baisakhi, the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive Rowlatt Act of 1919 that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial.

QUESTION: 13

Passage - 3

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the [1 ] massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar. On April 13, 2019, the then British Prime Minister Theresa May described the [1 ] massacre on April 13, 1919 as a "shameful scar" on the British Indian history. She, however, stopped short of a formal apology demanded by a cross-section of British parliamentarians in the previous debates.
[1] massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the [1], which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. The [2] pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face. Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short. Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets. Eyewitnesses described the aftermath saying that heaps of dead bodies lay there, some on their backs and some with their faces upturned.

Q. At the [1], People also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. Who among the following two leaders were redacted with [4] in the passage above?

Solution:

Jallianwala Bagh massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the Jallianwala Bagh, which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate Baisakhi, the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive Rowlatt Act that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders - Satya Pal and Dr Saifuddin Kitchlew. The Baisakhi pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face.

QUESTION: 14

Passage - 3

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the [1 ] massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar. On April 13, 2019, the then British Prime Minister Theresa May described the [1 ] massacre on April 13, 1919 as a "shameful scar" on the British Indian history. She, however, stopped short of a formal apology demanded by a cross-section of British parliamentarians in the previous debates.
[1] massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the [1], which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. The
[2] pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face. Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short. Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets. Eyewitnesses described the aftermath saying that heaps of dead bodies lay there, some on their backs and some with their faces upturned.

Q. On April 13, 2019, British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. Who among the following commanders has been redacted with [5] in the passage above?

Solution:

Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by General Reginald Dyer and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short.Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets.

QUESTION: 15

Passage - 3

April 13, 2019 marked 100 years of the [1] massacre. Considered one of the deadliest attacks in the history of the world, the [1 ] massacre led to the deaths of hundreds of unarmed Indians by the soldiers of the British Indian Army in Amritsar. On April 13, 2019, the then British Prime Minister Theresa May described the [1 ] massacre on April 13, 1919 as a "shameful scar" on the British Indian history. She, however, stopped short of a formal apology demanded by a cross-section of British parliamentarians in the previous debates.
[1] massacre was one of deadliest attacks in the history of the world and also marked a turning point in India's freedom struggle. At the [1], which is a garden spread across 6 to 7 acres in Amritsar in Punjab, a large gathering of 15,000-20,000 people with a majority of Sikhs, had gathered to celebrate [2], the Punjabi harvest festival. They had also gathered to revolt against the repressive [3] that led to stricter control of the press, arrests without warrant and indefinite detention without trial. They also came together in solidarity to condemn the arrest and deportation of two national leaders [4]. The [2] pilgrims had no idea on what they were about to face. Around 50 soldiers of the British Indian Army marched into the garden space, commanded by [5] and sealed the exits. On his orders, the troops indiscriminately fired on the group of gathered civilians for about 10 minutes till the ammunition ran short. Unable to escape, people tried to climb the walls of the park but failed. Many jumped in the only well inside the garden to save themselves from the bullets. Eyewitnesses described the aftermath saying that heaps of dead bodies lay there, some on their backs and some with their faces upturned.

Q. Who was the Viceroy of India at the time of [1] massacre?

Solution:

Viscount Chelmsford was a British statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1916 to 1921, where he was responsible for the creation of the Montagu- Chelmsford reforms. He was the Viceroy of India at the time of Jallianwala Bagh massacre which took place on April 13, 1919. Rabindranath Tagore renounced his knighthood in response to the Jallianwala Bagh massacre in 1919.

QUESTION: 16

Passage - 4

The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of [1 ] and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carrier [1] Express and ground-handling arm AISATS. The government has offered to hive off liabilities worth nearly Rs 40,000 crore to sweeten the deal.
On the table is 100% stake in [1], 100% stake in [1] Express Limited and all of the government's 50% stake in AISATS, which is a joint venture with [2]-based ground handling company SATS Limited.
The new buyer will get a total of 146 aircraft, 56% of which are owned by the airline group, while the remaining are on lease. It will also benefit from as much as 50% of international market share held by Indian airlines as well as the airline's 4,400 airport slots at airports in the country and 3,300 slots in 42 countries, which will be available at least for six months after the sale is complete. As many as 9,617 permanent employees, including pilots and cabin crew with deep technical and operational expertise, will be up for grabs along with the airline's brand as well as the mascot "[3]" and "Flying swan" logo. Any private or public limited company, a corporate body and a fund with a net value of Rs 3,500 crore will be eligible to bid. [1 ] airline was founded by J. R. D. Tata as Tata Airlines in [4]. After World War II, it became a public limited company and was renamed as Air India.

Q. The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of [1] and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carriers. Which of the following airlines has been redacted with [1] in the passage above?

Solution:

The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of Air India (AI) and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carrier Air India Express and ground-handling arm AISATS. The government has offered to hive off liabilities worth nearly Rs 40,000 crore to sweeten the deal.

QUESTION: 17

Passage - 4

The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of [1 ] and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carrier [1] Express and ground-handling arm AISATS. The government has offered to hive off liabilities worth nearly Rs 40,000 crore to sweeten the deal.
On the table is 100% stake in [1], 100% stake in [1] Express Limited and all of the government's 50% stake in AISATS, which is a joint venture with [2]-based ground handling company SATS Limited.
The new buyer will get a total of 146 aircraft, 56% of which are owned by the airline group, while the remaining are on lease. It will also benefit from as much as 50% of international market share held by Indian airlines as well as the airline's 4,400 airport slots at airports in the country and 3,300 slots in 42 countries, which will be available at least for six months after the sale is complete. As many as 9,617 permanent employees, including pilots and cabin crew with deep technical and operational expertise, will be up for grabs along with the airline's brand as well as the mascot "[3]" and "Flying swan" logo. Any private or public limited company, a corporate body and a fund with a net value of Rs 3,500 crore will be eligible to bid. [1 ] airline was founded by J. R. D. Tata as Tata Airlines in [4]. After World War II, it became a public limited company and was renamed as Air India.

Q. AISATS is a joint venture with [2]-based ground handling company. Which of the following countries is redacted with [2] in the passage above?

Solution:

On the table is 100% stake in AI, 100% stake in AI Express Limited (AIXL) and all of the government's 50% stake in AI-SATS, which is a joint venture with Singapore-based ground handling company SATS Limited.

QUESTION: 18

Passage - 4

The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of [1 ] and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carrier [1] Express and ground-handling arm AISATS. The government has offered to hive off liabilities worth nearly Rs 40,000 crore to sweeten the deal.
On the table is 100% stake in [1], 100% stake in [1] Express Limited and all of the government's 50% stake in AISATS, which is a joint venture with [2]-based ground handling company SATS Limited.
The new buyer will get a total of 146 aircraft, 56% of which are owned by the airline group, while the remaining are on lease. It will also benefit from as much as 50% of international market share held by Indian airlines as well as the airline's 4,400 airport slots at airports in the country and 3,300 slots in 42 countries, which will be available at least for six months after the sale is complete. As many as 9,617 permanent employees, including pilots and cabin crew with deep technical and operational expertise, will be up for grabs along with the airline's brand as well as the mascot "[3]" and "Flying swan" logo. Any private or public limited company, a corporate body and a fund with a net value of Rs 3,500 crore will be eligible to bid. [1 ] airline was founded by J. R. D. Tata as Tata Airlines in [4]. After World War II, it became a public limited company and was renamed as Air India.

Q. Which of the following is the mascot of [1] whose name has been redacted with [3] in the passage above?

Solution:

The new buyer will get a total of 146 aircraft, 56% of which are owned by the airline group, while the remaining are on lease. As many as 9,617 permanent employees, including pilots and cabin crew with deep technical and operational expertise, will be up for grabs along with the airline's brand as well as the mascot "Maharaja'' and "Flying swan" logo.

QUESTION: 19

Passage - 4

The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of [1 ] and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carrier [1] Express and ground-handling arm AISATS. The government has offered to hive off liabilities worth nearly Rs 40,000 crore to sweeten the deal.
On the table is 100% stake in [1], 100% stake in [1] Express Limited and all of the government's 50% stake in AISATS, which is a joint venture with [2]-based ground handling company SATS Limited.
The new buyer will get a total of 146 aircraft, 56% of which are owned by the airline group, while the remaining are on lease. It will also benefit from as much as 50% of international market share held by Indian airlines as well as the airline's 4,400 airport slots at airports in the country and 3,300 slots in 42 countries, which will be available at least for six months after the sale is complete. As many as 9,617 permanent employees, including pilots and cabin crew with deep technical and operational expertise, will be up for grabs along with the airline's brand as well as the mascot "[3]" and "Flying swan" logo. Any private or public limited company, a corporate body and a fund with a net value of Rs 3,500 crore will be eligible to bid. [1 ] airline was founded by J. R. D. Tata as Tata Airlines in [4]. After World War II, it became a public limited company and was renamed as Air India.

Q. In which of the following years, [1] was founded by J. R. (d) Tata as Tata Airlines whose year has been redacted with [4] in the passage above?

Solution:

Air India airline was founded by J. R. D. Tata as Tata Airlines in 1932. After World War II, it became a public limited company on 29 July 1946 and was renamed as Air India.

QUESTION: 20

Passage - 4

The Union government invited bids for 100% stake sale of [1 ] and transfer of management control along with its complete share in two subsidiaries-low-cost international carrier [1] Express and ground-handling arm AISATS. The government has offered to hive off liabilities worth nearly Rs 40,000 crore to sweeten the deal.
On the table is 100% stake in [1], 100% stake in [1] Express Limited and all of the government's 50% stake in AISATS, which is a joint venture with [2]-based ground handling company SATS Limited.
The new buyer will get a total of 146 aircraft, 56% of which are owned by the airline group, while the remaining are on lease. It will also benefit from as much as 50% of international market share held by Indian airlines as well as the airline's 4,400 airport slots at airports in the country and 3,300 slots in 42 countries, which will be available at least for six months after the sale is complete. As many as 9,617 permanent employees, including pilots and cabin crew with deep technical and operational expertise, will be up for grabs along with the airline's brand as well as the mascot "[3]" and "Flying swan" logo. Any private or public limited company, a corporate body and a fund with a net value of Rs 3,500 crore will be eligible to bid. [1 ] airline was founded by J. R. D. Tata as Tata Airlines in [4]. After World War II, it became a public limited company and was renamed as Air India.

Q. The world's first all jet airline is

Solution:

On 21 February 1960, Air India was tagged as the first Asian airline that had introduced a jet aircraft in its fleet, as it launched its first Boeing 707-42. Further, on 11 June 1962, Air India was known as the world's first all-jet airline.

QUESTION: 21

Passage - 5
The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Mr. [1], an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President [2], to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that [1]'s conviction by a military court be dismissed. The court also extended a stay on the execution of [1] pending a
Pakistani legal review and reconsideration of the conviction based on the ICJ's ruling that [1]'s rights to consular access were violated. Pakistan contended that [1] did not have a right to consular access because he had been convicted of espionage and "terrorism", but the court ruled that Article 36 of the [3] Convention on consular relations was applicable.
"The Court therefore concludes that Pakistan has breached the obligations incumbent on it under Article 36 of the [3] Convention, by denying consular officers of India access to [1], contrary to their right to visit him, to converse and correspond with him, and to arrange for his legal representation," said [2]. The convention was applicable "regardless of the allegations that [1] was engaged in espionage activities".
Mr. [1], a former Indian navy officer, was arrested by Pakistani authorities in the southwestern province of [4] in March 2016 and charged with espionage. Following a trial behind closed doors by a Pakistani military tribunal, [1 ] was convicted of espionage, sabotage and terrorism, and sentenced to death in April 2017.

Q. In the given passage, the name of the person sentenced to death by Pakistan in April 2017 has been replaced with [1]. What is the name of the person?

Solution:

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Kulbhushan Jadhav, an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf, to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that Jadhav's conviction by a military court be dismissed.

QUESTION: 22

Passage - 5
The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Mr. [1], an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President [2], to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that [1]'s conviction by a military court be dismissed. The court also extended a stay on the execution of [1] pending a
Pakistani legal review and reconsideration of the conviction based on the ICJ's ruling that [1]'s rights to consular access were violated. Pakistan contended that [1] did not have a right to consular access because he had been convicted of espionage and "terrorism", but the court ruled that Article 36 of the [3] Convention on consular relations was applicable.
"The Court therefore concludes that Pakistan has breached the obligations incumbent on it under Article 36 of the [3] Convention, by denying consular officers of India access to [1], contrary to their right to visit him, to converse and correspond with him, and to arrange for his legal representation," said [2]. The convention was applicable "regardless of the allegations that [1] was engaged in espionage activities".
Mr. [1], a former Indian navy officer, was arrested by Pakistani authorities in the southwestern province of [4] in March 2016 and charged with espionage. Following a trial behind closed doors by a Pakistani military tribunal, [1 ] was convicted of espionage, sabotage and terrorism, and sentenced to death in April 2017.

Q. In the given passage, the name of the Convention on the basis of which India filed its claims before the International Court of Justice has been replaced with '[3]'. What is the name of the Convention?

Solution:

Pakistan contended that Jadhav did not have a right to consular access because he had been convicted of espionage and "terrorism", but the court ruled that Article 36 of the Vienna Convention on consular relations was applicable

QUESTION: 23

Passage - 5
The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Mr. [1], an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President [2], to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that [1]'s conviction by a military court be dismissed. The court also extended a stay on the execution of [1] pending a
Pakistani legal review and reconsideration of the conviction based on the ICJ's ruling that [1]'s rights to consular access were violated. Pakistan contended that [1] did not have a right to consular access because he had been convicted of espionage and "terrorism", but the court ruled that Article 36 of the [3] Convention on consular relations was applicable.
"The Court therefore concludes that Pakistan has breached the obligations incumbent on it under Article 36 of the [3] Convention, by denying consular officers of India access to [1], contrary to their right to visit him, to converse and correspond with him, and to arrange for his legal representation," said [2]. The convention was applicable "regardless of the allegations that [1] was engaged in espionage activities".
Mr. [1], a former Indian navy officer, was arrested by Pakistani authorities in the southwestern province of [4] in March 2016 and charged with espionage. Following a trial behind closed doors by a Pakistani military tribunal, [1 ] was convicted of espionage, sabotage and terrorism, and sentenced to death in April 2017.

Q. Who amongst the following Indian judges had not served as the judge of the International Court of Justice?

Solution:

Indian judges Nagendra Singh, Dalveer Bhandari and B. N. Rau have also been served as the judges of the International Court of Justice. Harilal Jekisundas Kania was the first Chief Justice of India. He has not served as the judge of the International Court of Justice.

QUESTION: 24

Passage - 5
The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Mr. [1], an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President [2], to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that [1]'s conviction by a military court be dismissed. The court also extended a stay on the execution of [1] pending a
Pakistani legal review and reconsideration of the conviction based on the ICJ's ruling that [1]'s rights to consular access were violated. Pakistan contended that [1] did not have a right to consular access because he had been convicted of espionage and "terrorism", but the court ruled that Article 36 of the [3] Convention on consular relations was applicable.
"The Court therefore concludes that Pakistan has breached the obligations incumbent on it under Article 36 of the [3] Convention, by denying consular officers of India access to [1], contrary to their right to visit him, to converse and correspond with him, and to arrange for his legal representation," said [2]. The convention was applicable "regardless of the allegations that [1] was engaged in espionage activities".
Mr. [1], a former Indian navy officer, was arrested by Pakistani authorities in the southwestern province of [4] in March 2016 and charged with espionage. Following a trial behind closed doors by a Pakistani military tribunal, [1 ] was convicted of espionage, sabotage and terrorism, and sentenced to death in April 2017.

Q. Pakistan arrested Mr. [1] on charges of spying in [4], which of the following provinces of Pakistan has been redacted with [4] in the passage above?

Solution:

Jadhav, a former Indian navy officer, was arrested by Pakistani authorities in the southwestern province of Balochistan in March 2016 and charged with espionage. Following a trial behind closed doors by a Pakistani military tribunal, Jadhav was convicted of espionage, sabotage and terrorism, and sentenced to death in April 2017.

QUESTION: 25

Passage - 5
The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Mr. [1], an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President [2], to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that [1]'s conviction by a military court be dismissed. The court also extended a stay on the execution of [1] pending a
Pakistani legal review and reconsideration of the conviction based on the ICJ's ruling that [1]'s rights to consular access were violated. Pakistan contended that [1] did not have a right to consular access because he had been convicted of espionage and "terrorism", but the court ruled that Article 36 of the [3] Convention on consular relations was applicable.
"The Court therefore concludes that Pakistan has breached the obligations incumbent on it under Article 36 of the [3] Convention, by denying consular officers of India access to [1], contrary to their right to visit him, to converse and correspond with him, and to arrange for his legal representation," said [2]. The convention was applicable "regardless of the allegations that [1] was engaged in espionage activities".
Mr. [1], a former Indian navy officer, was arrested by Pakistani authorities in the southwestern province of [4] in March 2016 and charged with espionage. Following a trial behind closed doors by a Pakistani military tribunal, [1 ] was convicted of espionage, sabotage and terrorism, and sentenced to death in April 2017.

Q. What is the name of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) President redacted with [2] in the passage above and also law applied by the International Court of Justice in the above case is set out in which of the following?

Solution:

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ordered Pakistan to allow India consular access to Kulbhushan Jadhav, an Indian citizen convicted of espionage in Pakistan. The judgment, delivered by ICJ President Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf, to a packed court at The Hague, however, rejected India's demand that Jadhav's conviction by a military court be dismissed. The law applied by the International Court of Justice is set out in the Statute of the International Court of Justice.

QUESTION: 26

Passage - 6

Brexit referendum was held in June [1] under the then United Kingdom Prime Minister [2], when 17.4 million people opted for Brexit. This gave the Leave side 52%, compared with 48% for Remain. The UK joined European Union in [3] and it was the first member state to withdraw. The UK formally left the EU on [4], but there is still a lot to talk about and months of negotiation to come.
While the UK has agreed the terms of its EU departure, both sides still need to decide what their future relationship will look like. This will need to be worked out during the transition period (which some prefer to call the implementation period), which began immediately after Brexit day and is due to end on 31 December 2020. Brexit was originally meant to happen on 29 March 2019, but the deadline was delayed twice after MPs rejected the deal negotiated by Mrs May, the prime minister at the time. After MPs voted down the deal for a third time, Mrs May was resigned. Mr Johnson needed a Brexit extension of his own after MPs failed to get the revised deal passed into law. This led to the new deadline of [4]. Mr Johnson then called an early general election, to which MPs agreed. The election, which happened on 12 December 2019, resulted in a [5] majority of 80. With a sizeable majority in Parliament, it proved straightforward to pass the Brexit legislation.

Q. Brexit referendum was held in June [1] under the then United Kingdom Prime Minister [2], which of the following years and Prime Ministers have been redacted with [1] and [2] in the passage above?

Solution:

A public vote (known as a referendum) was held in June 2016, when 17.4 million people opted for Brexit. This gave the Leave side 52%, compared with 48% for Remain. The UK joined European Union in 1973 (when it was known as the European Economic Community) and it will be the first member state to withdraw. Brexit referendum was held in June 2016 under the then United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron.

QUESTION: 27

Passage - 6

Brexit referendum was held in June [1] under the then United Kingdom Prime Minister [2], when 17.4 million people opted for Brexit. This gave the Leave side 52%, compared with 48% for Remain. The UK joined European Union in [3] and it was the first member state to withdraw. The UK formally left the EU on [4], but there is still a lot to talk about and months of negotiation to come.
While the UK has agreed the terms of its EU departure, both sides still need to decide what their future relationship will look like. This will need to be worked out during the transition period (which some prefer to call the implementation period), which began immediately after Brexit day and is due to end on 31 December 2020. Brexit was originally meant to happen on 29 March 2019, but the deadline was delayed twice after MPs rejected the deal negotiated by Mrs May, the prime minister at the time. After MPs voted down the deal for a third time, Mrs May was resigned. Mr Johnson needed a Brexit extension of his own after MPs failed to get the revised deal passed into law. This led to the new deadline of [4]. Mr Johnson then called an early general election, to which MPs agreed. The election, which happened on 12 December 2019, resulted in a [5] majority of 80. With a sizeable majority in Parliament, it proved straightforward to pass the Brexit legislation.

Q. After UK has withdrawn from the European Union, how many member countries are there in the European Union?

Solution:

The European Union (EU) consists of 27 member states. Each member state is party to the founding treaties of the union and thereby shares in the privileges and obligations of membership. Until 2020, no member state had withdrawn or been suspended from the EU, though some dependent territories or semi-autonomous areas had previously left.

QUESTION: 28

Passage - 6

Brexit referendum was held in June [1] under the then United Kingdom Prime Minister [2], when 17.4 million people opted for Brexit. This gave the Leave side 52%, compared with 48% for Remain. The UK joined European Union in [3] and it was the first member state to withdraw. The UK formally left the EU on [4], but there is still a lot to talk about and months of negotiation to come.
While the UK has agreed the terms of its EU departure, both sides still need to decide what their future relationship will look like. This will need to be worked out during the transition period (which some prefer to call the implementation period), which began immediately after Brexit day and is due to end on 31 December 2020. Brexit was originally meant to happen on 29 March 2019, but the deadline was delayed twice after MPs rejected the deal negotiated by Mrs May, the prime minister at the time. After MPs voted down the deal for a third time, Mrs May was resigned. Mr Johnson needed a Brexit extension of his own after MPs failed to get the revised deal passed into law. This led to the new deadline of [4]. Mr Johnson then called an early general election, to which MPs agreed. The election, which happened on 12 December 2019, resulted in a [5] majority of 80. With a sizeable majority in Parliament, it proved straightforward to pass the Brexit legislation.

Q. The UK joined European Union in [3] and it was the first member state to withdraw from the EU. Which of the following years has been redacted with [3] in the passage above?

Solution:

The UK joined European Union in 1973 (when it was known as the European Economic Community) and it will be the first member state to withdraw.

QUESTION: 29

Passage - 6

Brexit referendum was held in June [1] under the then United Kingdom Prime Minister [2], when 17.4 million people opted for Brexit. This gave the Leave side 52%, compared with 48% for Remain. The UK joined European Union in [3] and it was the first member state to withdraw. The UK formally left the EU on [4], but there is still a lot to talk about and months of negotiation to come.
While the UK has agreed the terms of its EU departure, both sides still need to decide what their future relationship will look like. This will need to be worked out during the transition period (which some prefer to call the implementation period), which began immediately after Brexit day and is due to end on 31 December 2020. Brexit was originally meant to happen on 29 March 2019, but the deadline was delayed twice after MPs rejected the deal negotiated by Mrs May, the prime minister at the time. After MPs voted down the deal for a third time, Mrs May was resigned. Mr Johnson needed a Brexit extension of his own after MPs failed to get the revised deal passed into law. This led to the new deadline of [4]. Mr Johnson then called an early general election, to which MPs agreed. The election, which happened on 12 December 2019, resulted in a [5] majority of 80. With a sizeable majority in Parliament, it proved straightforward to pass the Brexit legislation.

Q. The UK government invoked of the Treaty on European Union on 29 March 2017 to formally initiate the Brexit process.

Solution:

The UK government invoked Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union on 29 March 2017 to formally initiate the Brexit process.

QUESTION: 30

Which country has passed the ‘Holocaust property bill’?

Solution:

Poland’s lower house of parliament passed a draft ‘Holocaust property bill’, which introduced several limitations on claims for the recovery of property lost in World War 2.

The legislation could affect up to 90 percent of property compensation requests from Holocaust survivors and their descendants. Israel has summoned Poland’s ambassador to express its disappointment over the bill. 

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