NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1


32 Questions MCQ Test MBA Exams Mock Test Series and Past Year Question Papers | NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1


Description
This mock test of NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1 for CAT helps you for every CAT entrance exam. This contains 32 Multiple Choice Questions for CAT NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CAT students definitely take this NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other NMAT Language Skills MCQ Quiz - 1 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Choose the synonym of the given word.  

Milieu

Solution:

“Milieu” refers to ‘surroundings; which can also be of a social or cultural nature’. “Domain” meaning ‘territories’ is synonymous to “milieu". Option 2 is correct.
A “seer” is ‘a person who prophecies’; “mileage” refers to ‘distance in miles’. Eliminate options 1 and 3.
Options 4 and 5 are out of context.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 2

Choose the correct antonym for the word below from the options provided.

exiguous

Solution:

“Exiguous” means ‘scarce’. Its antonym is ‘abundant or plenty’. Option 3 is correct. “Indigenous” means ‘native or inborn’. Eliminate option 1. “Patriotic” means ‘having or expressing devotion to and vigorous support for one's country’. Eliminate option 2. “Treacherous” means ‘guilty of or involving betrayal or deception’. Eliminate option 4. “Merriment” means ‘great pleasure’. Eliminate option 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 3

Given below are a few jumbled sentences. Rearrange the sentences in a proper and logical sequence.

A. In March, the business' official Twitter account listed all the people who hadn't bothered to show up for or cancel their dinner reservations with enough notice.

B. It's the revenge of the chefs; after being subjected to ridicule and slander on social media and blogs, restaurants and chefs are enjoying playing a little power game.

C. Red Medicine, an upscale restaurant in Beverly Hills, California, was among the first ones to take shaming no-shows to Twitter.

D. Restaurants are now dealing with reservation no-shows on social media like Twitter by naming diners who didn't even bother to cancel.

E. "Hi Kyle Anderson (323), I hope you enjoyed your gf s bday and the flowers that you didn't bring when you no-showed for your 8:15 res. Thanks", said one tweet.

Solution:

The paragraph highlights a trend whereby restaurants are using the medium of twitter to take a dig at “no-show” diners. Since it is usually diners or consumers who slander restaurants, and it is the brand value and equity of the restaurant which is at stake, the activities mentioned in the paragraph indicate a reverse trend.

Keeping this in mind, statement B sets the tone for the rest of the sequence with, “It's the revenge of the chefs...”. Statement C cannot be the introductory statement as it does not adequately establish what “shaming” is. Eliminate options 1, 2 and 5. Statement A is not introductory in nature, since it talks about “the business” which refers to a business introduced in a previous sentence. Eliminate option 3.
Statement B is followed by statements D and C, in that order. A generalized statement about such restaurants is made in D and an example is given through C. “The business' official Twitter account listed...” in sentence A, indicates that it is talking about the business of “Red Medicine”. Therefore, it follows C.
Sentence E is an example of a tweet from the restaurant. This order of BDCAE can be observed in option 4.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 4

Arrange the jumbled sentences in order.

A. Inside the bank that June morning, the clerks and accountants on their high stools were bent over their ponderous ledgers, although it was several minutes before the opening hour.

B. Considerable noise, despite the closed windows and doors, came in from the outside.

C. There was also a whir of a street-sweeping machine turning a comer and the shrill cries of newsboys selling the morning papers.

D. This gray-stone building was in Atlanta’s most central part on a narrow street paved with asphalt which sloped down from one of the main thoroughfares to the section occupied by the old passenger depot, the railway warehouses, and hotels of various grades.

E. Locomotive bells slowly swung and clanged; steam was escaping; cabs, drays, and trucks rumbled and creaked along;

Solution:

Looking at the options, we have a choice between statements A, C and D as the opening statement of the sequence. Statements C and D are not appropriate introductory statements, as C has the word “also” in reference to something mentioned in a previous statement, while D uses the word “this”. Eliminate options 3 and 4. Statement A is an appropriate starting sentence, as it establishes the setting of the passage by describing activities in and around a bank.
Statement D follows by telling us the location of the bank.
Statement B explains there are noises outside and thus, continues the discussion on the bank further. Eliminate options 1 and 5.
Statement E describes the noises mentioned in B and statement C with “also” adds to the list of noises.
Thus, the correct order is, ADBEC.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 5

Identify the part in the sentence below that has a grammatical error. The number of that part is the answer. Ignore punctuation errors, if any.

1. This is not quite conclusive, however,

2. and hypothesis that have features,

3. at least strongly reminiscent of Lamarckism,

4. keep popping up in biology and are often taken seriously,

5. in spite of the general taboo against anything smacking of Lamarckism.

Solution:

The error is in part 2 of the sentence. The word “hypothesis” should be in the plural, i.e. ‘hypotheses’, as indicated by the plural verbs in parts 2 and 4, and the lack of an article ‘a’ which would be typically used with “hypothesis”.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 6

A sentence is divided into five parts. Identify the part that has a grammatical error. 

With much of the global economy apparently / trapped in a long and painful austerity-induced slump, / its time to admit that the trap is entirely of our own making  / as we have constructed it from unfortunate habits of / thought about how to handle spiraling public debt. 

Solution:

“Its” in part 3 is incorrect as it means ‘belonging to it’. The correct word should be ‘it’s’ which is a contraction of the phrase ‘it is’.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 7

Choose the synonym of the given word.

Insidious

Solution:

“Insidious” means ‘stealthily treacherous or deceitful’. “Cunning” is closest in meaning to “insidious”. 

“Abominable” means ‘repugnantly hateful’ and “scrupulous” refers to a ‘principled person’. Eliminate options 2 and 3.
Options 1 and 5 are out of context.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 8

Group Question

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.
The inclusiveness of the various identity theories promoted in feminist philosophy is of preeminent and persistent concern to women with disabilities. Discussing whether women with disabilities can comfortably be feminists, Anita Silvers has asked whether feminism privileges the functional capabilities and social roles characteristic of “normal” women. She has found some feminist theories guilty of “magnifying these (functional capabilities of typical women) until they become standards of womanhood against which disabled women shrink into invisibility”.

Feminist philosophy validates and valorizes activities women typically execute and in which they excel, such as theories of maternal ethics that center on mothering as preeminent moral conduct. But not all women are admitted to women's roles. Even in the most progressive contemporary societies, women with disabilities encounter opposition to their maintaining fertility, or accessing reproductive medical technology in achieving fertility, or even retaining custody of the children to which they have given birth. Karin Barron, who has conducted extensive research on the lives of young women with disabilities, observes that we place great value on the womanly art of caring for dependents, but the traditional dependent position of young women with disabilities prevents them from occupying, and therefore from demonstrating any aptitude for, this role. What precluded the young women Barron studied from being homemakers and mothers was not their lack of potential for serving in these roles but, instead, their having been assigned to an alternative social position, one defined in terms of such dependence that their capacity to nurture others became virtually inconceivable.

 

Q. The primary concern of the author of this passage pertains to

Solution:

The passage talks about how disabled women are excluded from feminism because of their inability to carry out the tasks that normal women excel in. This is best reflected in option 3. Option 1 is incorrect, because the valorization of activities executed by women is merely one of the characteristics of feminism.

The passage focuses more on how feminism discounts disabled women for not being able to do the activities carried out by normal women.
Option 2 is incorrect as it pertains to the influence of society alone and does not focus on what happens in feminism.
Option 4 is wrong because while societies' opposition to the rights of disabled women to bear children has been mentioned in the passage, nothing has been said about whether they embrace feminism or not. Therefore, their hypocrisy regarding this is out of the question.
Option 5 is incorrect, because it has a flaw - the study described in this passage did not aim to demonstrate the lack of potential in disabled women for mothering. Instead, it demonstrated how their disabilities and consequent dependent social role prevented them from displaying their potential.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 9

The inclusiveness of the various identity theories promoted in feminist philosophy is of preeminent and persistent concern to women with disabilities. Discussing whether women with disabilities can comfortably be feminists, Anita Silvers has asked whether feminism privileges the functional capabilities and social roles characteristic of “normal” women. She has found some feminist theories guilty of “magnifying these (functional capabilities of typical women) until they become standards of womanhood against which disabled women shrink into invisibility”.

Feminist philosophy validates and valorizes activities women typically execute and in which they excel, such as theories of maternal ethics that center on mothering as preeminent moral conduct. But not all women are admitted to women's roles. Even in the most progressive contemporary societies, women with disabilities encounter opposition to their maintaining fertility, or accessing reproductive medical technology in achieving fertility, or even retaining custody of the children to which they have given birth. Karin Barron, who has conducted extensive research on the lives of young women with disabilities, observes that we place great value on the womanly art of caring for dependents, but the traditional dependent position of young women with disabilities prevents them from occupying, and therefore from demonstrating any aptitude for, this role. What precluded the young women Barron studied from being homemakers and mothers was not their lack of potential for serving in these roles but, instead, their having been assigned to an alternative social position, one defined in terms of such dependence that their capacity to nurture others became virtually inconceivable.

 

Q. According to the passage, what is the basic flaw in feminist philosophy?

Solution:

The passage says that feminism commits a grave error in that it excludes disabled women for the mere reason that they are unable to display their potential for excelling in the activities that normal women carry out. It glorifies the social and functional roles of normal women to such an extent that disabled women are considered inferior just because they cannot fulfil the same roles. This is best put forth by option 5.
Option 1 is incorrect, because according to the passage, "...the alternative social position..." has been assigned to disabled women by the society. Feminism has no role to play in this and hence it cannot be called a flaw of feminism.
Option 2 is incorrect because "...validating activities women typically execute and in which they excel..." is not necessarily a mistake. The act of validation cannot be considered harmful in itself.
Option 3 is incorrect because it is untrue. The passage implies that feminism subtly excludes disabled women from identity theories because they are unable to fulfil the traditional role women play, as a result of their position of dependence. Option 4 is incorrect because this is not stated in the passage as an action of feminism. This is just one of the things that contemporary societies are guilty of. Hence, the correct answer is option 5.

QUESTION: 10

The inclusiveness of the various identity theories promoted in feminist philosophy is of preeminent and persistent concern to women with disabilities. Discussing whether women with disabilities can comfortably be feminists, Anita Silvers has asked whether feminism privileges the functional capabilities and social roles characteristic of “normal” women. She has found some feminist theories guilty of “magnifying these (functional capabilities of typical women) until they become standards of womanhood against which disabled women shrink into invisibility”.

Feminist philosophy validates and valorizes activities women typically execute and in which they excel, such as theories of maternal ethics that center on mothering as preeminent moral conduct. But not all women are admitted to women's roles. Even in the most progressive contemporary societies, women with disabilities encounter opposition to their maintaining fertility, or accessing reproductive medical technology in achieving fertility, or even retaining custody of the children to which they have given birth. Karin Barron, who has conducted extensive research on the lives of young women with disabilities, observes that we place great value on the womanly art of caring for dependents, but the traditional dependent position of young women with disabilities prevents them from occupying, and therefore from demonstrating any aptitude for, this role. What precluded the young women Barron studied from being homemakers and mothers was not their lack of potential for serving in these roles but, instead, their having been assigned to an alternative social position, one defined in terms of such dependence that their capacity to nurture others became virtually inconceivable.

 

Q. Which one of the following cannot be inferred from the passage?

Solution:

Option 1 is incorrect, because the passage clearly mentions that feminism is guilty of excluding disabled women and making them feel inferior to normal women. Similarly, the passage describes how contemporary society is guilty of the very same thing making disabled women feel inferior by not permitting them to execute normal women's activities such as childbirth and childrearing. Therefore, it is a valid inference that feminism and contemporary society have commonalities. Option 2 is incorrect, as it can be inferred from the first two lines of the passage. Option 3 is incorrect, because it can be inferred from the lines "But not all women are admitted to women's roles".
Option 4 is correct, since we cannot infer this from the passage. While discussing the study by Karin Barron, the passage merely states that she argues that disabled women do not lack the potential for homemaking and child rearing, and that they are unable to be caregivers due to their dependent position which has been assigned to them. Her personal stance towards the predicament of disabled women, and whether she is sympathetic towards them has not been discussed. Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 11

The inclusiveness of the various identity theories promoted in feminist philosophy is of preeminent and persistent concern to women with disabilities. Discussing whether women with disabilities can comfortably be feminists, Anita Silvers has asked whether feminism privileges the functional capabilities and social roles characteristic of “normal” women. She has found some feminist theories guilty of “magnifying these (functional capabilities of typical women) until they become standards of womanhood against which disabled women shrink into invisibility”.

Feminist philosophy validates and valorizes activities women typically execute and in which they excel, such as theories of maternal ethics that center on mothering as preeminent moral conduct. But not all women are admitted to women's roles. Even in the most progressive contemporary societies, women with disabilities encounter opposition to their maintaining fertility, or accessing reproductive medical technology in achieving fertility, or even retaining custody of the children to which they have given birth. Karin Barron, who has conducted extensive research on the lives of young women with disabilities, observes that we place great value on the womanly art of caring for dependents, but the traditional dependent position of young women with disabilities prevents them from occupying, and therefore from demonstrating any aptitude for, this role. What precluded the young women Barron studied from being homemakers and mothers was not their lack of potential for serving in these roles but, instead, their having been assigned to an alternative social position, one defined in terms of such dependence that their capacity to nurture others became virtually inconceivable.

 

Q. Which of these statements is Karin Barron least likely to agree with?

Solution:

Karin Barron's study proved that "...what precluded the young women from being homemakers and mothers was not their lack of potential for serving in these roles but, instead, their having been assigned to an alternative social position (of dependence)...". Therefore, she is not likely to agree with option 2.
Options 1 and 3 are incorrect, because the passage states that most progressive societies oppose disabled women's right to achieve and maintain fertility.
However, Karin Barron's stance on this has not been delved upon in the passage. Options 4 and 5 are incorrect, because these are facts that have been stated in the passage, where Karin Barron's study has been discussed. Therefore, she is unlikely to disagree with them.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 12

Group Question

A passage is followed by questions pertaining to the passage. Read the passage and answer the questions. Choose the most appropriate answer.


Herodotus has sometimes been labeled 'The Father of Lies' due to his tendency to report fanciful information, even about himself. Much of the information that others subsequently reported about him is just as fanciful, some of it is vindictive and some of it is blatantly absurd, yet it is interesting and therefore worth reporting: Herodotus himself reported dubious information if it was interesting, sometimes adding his own opinion about its reliability. Plutarch, a Theban by birth, once composed a “great collection of slanders” against Herodotus. His account was supported by Marcellinus in his Life of Thucydides. In fact Herodotus was in the habit of seeking out information from empowered sources within communities, such as aristocrats and priests, with Periclean Athens becoming his principal source of information about events in Greece. As a result, his reports about Greek events are often coloured by Athenian bias against rival states- Thebes and Corinth in particular.

Herodotus wrote his Histories in the Ionian dialect yet he was born in Halicarnassus, originally a Dorian settlement. According to the Suda (an 11th-century encyclopaedia of Byzantium which likely took its information from traditional accounts), Herodotus learned the Ionian dialect as a boy living on the island of Samos, whither he had fled with his family from the oppressions of Lygdamis, tyrant of Halicarnassus and grandson of Artemisia I of Caria. It was conventional in Herodotus's day for authors to ‘publish’ their works by reciting them at popular festivals. According to Lucian, Herodotus took his finished work straight from Asia Minor to the Olympic Games and read the entire Histories to the assembled spectators in one sitting, receiving rapturous applause at the end of it. Herodotus's recitation at Olympia was a favourite theme among ancient writers and there is another interesting variation on the story to be found in the Suda, Photius and Tzetzes, in which a young Thucydides happened to be in the assembly with his father and burst into tears during the recital, whereupon Herodotus observed prophetically to the boy's father: “Thy son's soul yearns for knowledge”.

 

Q. From the passage, one can deduce that Thucydides was:

Solution:

Option 3 can be deduced from the statement- “...a young Thucydides happened to be in the assembly with his father and burst into tears during the recital, whereupon Herodotus observed prophetically to the boy's father: “Thy son's soul yearns for knowledge”.” The key word here is “prophetically,” which means that Herodotus’ words came true in the future, and Thucydides did indeed become someone who valued knowledge. Combine it with the statement - “...account was supported by Marcellinus in his Life of Thucydides" and we can deduce that he was famous enough to have a book written on him.
Option 1 is incorrect as he clearly had great prospects.

Option 2 is incorrect as his life intersected with Herodutus; if it hadn’t, Herodotus wouldn’t have been mentioned in a book about Thucydides.
Option 4 is incorrect as a book was indeed written about him.
There is no data in the passage to support option 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3

QUESTION: 13

Herodotus has sometimes been labeled 'The Father of Lies' due to his tendency to report fanciful information, even about himself. Much of the information that others subsequently reported about him is just as fanciful, some of it is vindictive and some of it is blatantly absurd, yet it is interesting and therefore worth reporting: Herodotus himself reported dubious information if it was interesting, sometimes adding his own opinion about its reliability. Plutarch, a Theban by birth, once composed a “great collection of slanders” against Herodotus. His account was supported by Marcellinus in his Life of Thucydides. In fact Herodotus was in the habit of seeking out information from empowered sources within communities, such as aristocrats and priests, with Periclean Athens becoming his principal source of information about events in Greece. As a result, his reports about Greek events are often coloured by Athenian bias against rival states- Thebes and Corinth in particular.

Herodotus wrote his Histories in the Ionian dialect yet he was born in Halicarnassus, originally a Dorian settlement. According to the Suda (an 11th-century encyclopaedia of Byzantium which likely took its information from traditional accounts), Herodotus learned the Ionian dialect as a boy living on the island of Samos, whither he had fled with his family from the oppressions of Lygdamis, tyrant of Halicarnassus and grandson of Artemisia I of Caria. It was conventional in Herodotus's day for authors to ‘publish’ their works by reciting them at popular festivals. According to Lucian, Herodotus took his finished work straight from Asia Minor to the Olympic Games and read the entire Histories to the assembled spectators in one sitting, receiving rapturous applause at the end of it. Herodotus's recitation at Olympia was a favourite theme among ancient writers and there is another interesting variation on the story to be found in the Suda, Photius and Tzetzes, in which a young Thucydides happened to be in the assembly with his father and burst into tears during the recital, whereupon Herodotus observed prophetically to the boy's father: “Thy son's soul yearns for knowledge”.

 

Q. From the passage, what could a “Tzetzes” be?

Solution:

Towards the end of the passage, the author states, “Olympia was a favourite theme among ancient writers and there is another interesting variation on the story to be found in the Suda, Photius and Tzetzes”. Thus, the Suda, Photius and Tzetzes can be inferred as belonging to the same category of writing which contains stories. Further, in the second paragraph the author states, “According to the Suda (an 11th-century encyclopaedia of Byzantium which likely took its information from traditional accounts)...”. From these, we can deduce that the Suda is an encyclopedia, and that the Tzetzes is the same as the Suda.
There is no evidence to support options 2, 3, 4 and 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 14

Herodotus has sometimes been labeled 'The Father of Lies' due to his tendency to report fanciful information, even about himself. Much of the information that others subsequently reported about him is just as fanciful, some of it is vindictive and some of it is blatantly absurd, yet it is interesting and therefore worth reporting: Herodotus himself reported dubious information if it was interesting, sometimes adding his own opinion about its reliability. Plutarch, a Theban by birth, once composed a “great collection of slanders” against Herodotus. His account was supported by Marcellinus in his Life of Thucydides. In fact Herodotus was in the habit of seeking out information from empowered sources within communities, such as aristocrats and priests, with Periclean Athens becoming his principal source of information about events in Greece. As a result, his reports about Greek events are often coloured by Athenian bias against rival states- Thebes and Corinth in particular.

Herodotus wrote his Histories in the Ionian dialect yet he was born in Halicarnassus, originally a Dorian settlement. According to the Suda (an 11th-century encyclopaedia of Byzantium which likely took its information from traditional accounts), Herodotus learned the Ionian dialect as a boy living on the island of Samos, whither he had fled with his family from the oppressions of Lygdamis, tyrant of Halicarnassus and grandson of Artemisia I of Caria. It was conventional in Herodotus's day for authors to ‘publish’ their works by reciting them at popular festivals. According to Lucian, Herodotus took his finished work straight from Asia Minor to the Olympic Games and read the entire Histories to the assembled spectators in one sitting, receiving rapturous applause at the end of it. Herodotus's recitation at Olympia was a favourite theme among ancient writers and there is another interesting variation on the story to be found in the Suda, Photius and Tzetzes, in which a young Thucydides happened to be in the assembly with his father and burst into tears during the recital, whereupon Herodotus observed prophetically to the boy's father: “Thy son's soul yearns for knowledge”.

 

Q. Why is it surprising that Herodotus wrote his Histories in the Ionian dialect?

Solution:

Options 1 and 3 are mere assumptions and the passage does not contain data supporting them. Eliminate options 1, 3 and 5.
Option 2 is incorrect, as the passage does not mention what the language of Periclean Athens was.
A more direct explanation is given in option 4 - that his primary dialect should have been Dorian rather than Ionian. The passage mentions that “Herodotus wrote his Histories in the Ionian dialect yet he was born in Halicarnassus, originally a Dorian settlement." This implies that Herodotus should have used the Dorian dialect instead.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 15

Herodotus has sometimes been labeled 'The Father of Lies' due to his tendency to report fanciful information, even about himself. Much of the information that others subsequently reported about him is just as fanciful, some of it is vindictive and some of it is blatantly absurd, yet it is interesting and therefore worth reporting: Herodotus himself reported dubious information if it was interesting, sometimes adding his own opinion about its reliability. Plutarch, a Theban by birth, once composed a “great collection of slanders” against Herodotus. His account was supported by Marcellinus in his Life of Thucydides. In fact Herodotus was in the habit of seeking out information from empowered sources within communities, such as aristocrats and priests, with Periclean Athens becoming his principal source of information about events in Greece. As a result, his reports about Greek events are often coloured by Athenian bias against rival states- Thebes and Corinth in particular.

Herodotus wrote his Histories in the Ionian dialect yet he was born in Halicarnassus, originally a Dorian settlement. According to the Suda (an 11th-century encyclopaedia of Byzantium which likely took its information from traditional accounts), Herodotus learned the Ionian dialect as a boy living on the island of Samos, whither he had fled with his family from the oppressions of Lygdamis, tyrant of Halicarnassus and grandson of Artemisia I of Caria. It was conventional in Herodotus's day for authors to ‘publish’ their works by reciting them at popular festivals. According to Lucian, Herodotus took his finished work straight from Asia Minor to the Olympic Games and read the entire Histories to the assembled spectators in one sitting, receiving rapturous applause at the end of it. Herodotus's recitation at Olympia was a favourite theme among ancient writers and there is another interesting variation on the story to be found in the Suda, Photius and Tzetzes, in which a young Thucydides happened to be in the assembly with his father and burst into tears during the recital, whereupon Herodotus observed prophetically to the boy's father: “Thy son's soul yearns for knowledge”.

 

Q. A fact about Herodotus could be:

Solution:

According to the first paragraph, Herodotus was known to have reported fanciful information, even about himself. Therefore, a fact could be false, but Herodotus could yet be responsible for spreading it. This is in consonance with option 1. There is nothing in the paragraph to suggest that Herodotus vilified information - true or false - merely that he gave an opinion about how reliable it was. Therefore, eliminate options 2 and 3.
Option 4 with “glorified” is contrary to data presented in the passage, as it has been stated in the passage that a Theban called Plutarch composed a book of “slanders” against Herodotus.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 16

Choose the synonym of the given word.

Despondent

Solution:

“Despondent” means ‘feeling or showing profound hopelessness, dejection, discouragement, or gloom’. This points to “melancholy” which refers to ‘a gloomy state of mind’. “Vivacious” means ‘lively; animated’. “Amiable” means ‘friendly’. “Blithe” means ‘joyous’. “Effervescent” means ‘lively’. Eliminate options 1,2,3 and 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 17

Choose the synonym of the given word.  

Cavalier

Solution:

“Cavalier” means ‘haughty; disdainful’. “Insolent” is closest in meaning to “cavalier”, as it means to be ‘rude, contemptuous or disrespectful’. “Caviar” is the roe (mass of eggs) of a sturgeon; “warfare”, “cave”, and “cuisine” appear as irrelevant options. Eliminate options 1,2,4 and 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 18

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate sequence of prepositions given below.

Far separated______the crowd of fools, save only ______ their fate, were those who amid the mists_____error saw the light of Truth, and strove_____ tell men ______ her graces and perfections. The vulgar crowd could see no difference________the philosopher’s robe and the fool’s motley.  

Solution:

The correct phrase is “separated from”, which eliminates option 2.
In all the options “in” and “o f are repeated for the 2nd and 3rd blank.
The preposition “to” is used with the verb “strove”. This eliminates options 2 and 5.
The verb “tell” must be followed with the proposition ‘of since the correct phrase is ‘tell someone of something’, eliminating option 3.
When two things are compared “between” is used and not “amongst”, which eliminates option 4.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 19

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate set of words from the given options.

The great benefit which a scientific education bestows,_______as training or as knowledge, is dependent upon the extent to _______the mind of the student is brought into immediate contact with facts - _______the degree to which he learns the habit of appealing directly_____Nature, and of acquiring______ his senses concrete images of those properties of things, which are, and always will be,_______ approximately expressed in human language.

Solution:

The first sentence expresses a choice between alternatives “as training or as knowledge”; so the correct conjunction to use is “whether” which eliminates option 1.
The correct pronoun to use in the second blank is “which” and not “that” as the clause that follows the blank is not restrictive. This eliminates option 2.
As this clause explains the reasons or the target of an action, “upon” is the correct preposition to use and not “on” or “up” which explain the physical location of the thing which is denoted by them. This rules out options 3 and 4.
Hence, the correct answer is option 5.

QUESTION: 20

The options contain prepositions in a jumbled order. For the correct answer, choose the option, which presents the most logical sequence to fill in the blanks.

Having grown numb_______work, having lost a sense of what was permissible ______civilised society, the blackguards stooped_______ all sorts of disgusting behaviour, even blatantly violating the graves_____the deceased,________ their usual plunderings.

Solution:

The sentence starts off by using the participial construction "having grown". As a result of this tense construction, the adjective "numb" will not take the prepositions "to" or "of'. Eliminate options 2 and 3. Although it may seem that both the prepositions "with" and "from" can follow "numb", this is not so in the current context. 'Growing numb with work' would imply an ongoing process, where numbness and work go hand in hand. However, 'growing numb from work' would imply that the excessive work done in the past is responsible for the numbness. This fits better, since the rest of the sentence also refers to things in the past tense. Eliminate option 5.
The words "civilised society" require the preposition "in" preceding them. Eliminate option 4.
We say that people stoop "to" disgusting behaviour.
Graves belong to the deceased, and hence, the preposition showing possession, "of, should be used in this case.
The blackguards violated the graves apart from carrying out their usual plunderings (this is indicated by the word "even", since this shows it was not part of their usual activities), so we should use the preposition "besides" in the last blank.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 21

The options contain prepositions in a jumbled order. For the correct answer, choose the option, which presents the most logical sequence to fill in the blanks.

____dreams I do not recollect that state _____ feeling so common when awake, _____thinking____ one subject while unseeingly looking____ another.

Solution:

In this sentence, the author talks about how he/she does not encounter the experience of day-dreaming in his/her dreams while he/she is asleep, although it is very common for him/her to do so when awake.
Both prepositions "in" and "between" can fit in the first blank. Therefore, we move on to the other prepositions to arrive at the correct answer.
We generally use the phrase "state of feeling" while referring to a particular sensation. Eliminate options 1 and 4 with "for".
The preposition "of1 fits in the third blank, since it further describes the state previously mentioned. We can say we 'think about' or 'think of a subject, both are appropriate, and we can either 'look for' or 'look at' something. However, "look for" means 'search' and this is a conscious action. It is not something that can be done "unseeingly" in dreams. Eliminate options 2 and 5.
Using the prepositions in option 3, by stating that in dreams he/she does not "think o f something while "looking at" something else, the author is trying to convey that daydreaming does not occur in actual dreams. This is logical.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 22

Fill in the blanks with prepositions:

He told her how he spent the long hours walking__the lakeside and looking__ the coast__France.

Solution:

The noun “lakeside” requires the preposition “by”, just as 'roadside' or 'riverside' would. “In”, “at”, and “on” are inappropriate. Eliminate options 1,2, and 5.
Looking “at” the entire French coast at once would be impossible; looking “for” it would be logically incoherent. Looking “towards” the coast “o f France makes sense.
Eliminate option 3.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 23

Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate pair of words from the given options.

Rather than a certain_________or gesture giving intentions away, a subtle _________of clues may emerge dynamically during brief encounters.

Solution:

The statement discusses how intentions are given away during brief encounters. Option 1 cannot be considered as “signage” means ‘graphic designs, as symbols, emblems, or words, used especially for identification or as a means of giving directions or warning’; if ‘signs’ was used instead of “signage”, this option could have been considered. “Moderation” does not go well with dynamic emergence discussed in the latter half of the sentence. If the “clues” were moderated, it is not very likely that they would be dynamic. Eliminate option 2.
Option 4 is ruled out as “ethereal” means ‘light, airy, or tenuous’.
A “marquee” is ‘a roof like shelter, as of glass, projecting above an outer door and over a sidewalk or a terrace’. Eliminate option 5. “Grimace” means ‘a facial expression, often ugly or contorted, that indicates disapproval, pain’ and “constellation” works as a collective noun for “clues”. Option 3 is the best fit for the blanks.
Hence, the correct answer is option 3.

QUESTION: 24

Choose the synonym of the given word.

audacious

Solution:

“Audacious” means ‘extremely bold or daring’. “Brassy” is closest in meaning to “audacious” - it means ‘to be brazen or bold’. “Prudent” means ‘judiciously practical’. Eliminate option 3. “Nasty” implies ‘malevolent’ and the words “permission” and “audible” are not related to the given word. Eliminate options 2, 4 and 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 25

A sentence is divided into five parts. Identify the part that has a grammatical error. 

While the French Revolution of 1789, / always had foreign dimensions and repercussions, / and became an international event, / with the revolutionary wars, though it originated as, / a domestic development in one large country.

Solution:

“While” and “though” cannot be used in the same sentence - so the “though”, which comes later, is redundant. Therefore the error is in part 4.
The other parts of the sentence are grammatically correct.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 26

Choose the incorrect part of the sentence.

Technology shapes our consciousness, McLuhan argued, / and the development of the printed book, / in the mid-fifteenth century had inaugurated, / a reorientation of human experience towards, / the visual, the regimented, uniform and the instrumental. 

Solution:

Part 5 violates the rules of parallel construction: all four main words should be preceded by an article. It should read ‘...the uniform...’.
Hence, the correct answer is option 5.

QUESTION: 27

Group Question

Fill in the blanks in the passage with the most appropriate set of words from the options for each blank.


Can one generation bind another, and all subsequent generations, in_____A____ forever? Rights and powers can only belong to persons, not to mere matter that is not _____B______with will. The dead are not even things. The particles of matter which had _____C______their bodies, now make up a part of the bodies of other animals or minerals of a thousand forms. A generation may bind itself as long as its majority continues in life; when that has disappeared, another majority is in place and holds all the rights and powers their______D_______once held.

 

Q. A

Solution:

The hint for the first blank lies in the phrase "all subsequent generations". All the items that follow a particular item one after the other can be said to be in "succession" 'the act of following in order or sequence'. "Alternation" makes the sentence illogical, since it is not mentioned that every other generation is being skipped. Eliminate option 2. "Collusion" means 'a secret agreement' and "cadence" means 'rhythmic flow'. Therefore, "contract", "collusion" and "cadence" do not fit in the context of the statement. Eliminate options 3, 4 and 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 28

Can one generation bind another, and all subsequent generations, in_____A____ forever? Rights and powers can only belong to persons, not to mere matter that is not _____B______with will. The dead are not even things. The particles of matter which had _____C______their bodies, now make up a part of the bodies of other animals or minerals of a thousand forms. A generation may bind itself as long as its majority continues in life; when that has disappeared, another majority is in place and holds all the rights and powers their______D_______once held.

 

Q. B

Solution:

The word in the blank must have the meaning 'furnished with'.
When the adjective "possessed" refers to owning a thing or exhibiting an attribute, it is followed by the preposition 'of. Here we see that the preposition following the blank is "with". Therefore, we can eliminate option 1. "Sapient" means 'wise'. This does not fit contextually and makes the sentence logically incoherent.
Eliminate option 2. "Worthy" does not fit contextually and "facile" meaning 'moving with ease' also makes the sentence illogical. Eliminate options 3 and 5. "Endowed" meaning 'provided with' fits in the sentence contextually.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 29

Can one generation bind another, and all subsequent generations, in_____A____ forever? Rights and powers can only belong to persons, not to mere matter that is not _____B______with will. The dead are not even things. The particles of matter which had _____C______their bodies, now make up a part of the bodies of other animals or minerals of a thousand forms. A generation may bind itself as long as its majority continues in life; when that has disappeared, another majority is in place and holds all the rights and powers their______D_______once held.

 

Q. C

Solution:

The "particles of matter" being spoken about here, have been given the property of 'making up' "....a part of the bodies..." in the latter part of the sentence. Therefore the word in the blank must be something similar in meaning to 'make up'.
The presence of the auxiliary verb "had" before the blank does not allow us to use the word "comprised" in this blank. Eliminate option 1.

"Composed" means 'to make or form' and is appropriate in the given context. Therefore, option 2 is correct. "Predisposed" refers to 'being susceptible' and does not fit contextually. Eliminate option 3. "Reconciled" refers to 'being resigned to something not desired'. Eliminate option 4.
"Disposed" means 'discarded' and does not fit contextually. Eliminate option 5. Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

QUESTION: 30

Can one generation bind another, and all subsequent generations, in_____A____ forever? Rights and powers can only belong to persons, not to mere matter that is not _____B______with will. The dead are not even things. The particles of matter which had _____C______their bodies, now make up a part of the bodies of other animals or minerals of a thousand forms. A generation may bind itself as long as its majority continues in life; when that has disappeared, another majority is in place and holds all the rights and powers their______D_______once held.

 

Q. D

Solution:

The hint here is given by the words "once held" after the blank. This indicates that something in the past is being spoken of. "Successors" means 'people who succeed or follow', "offspring" means 'descendant' and "progeny" means 'descendants or offspring'. Therefore, these three options can be eliminated as they exist in the future, i.e., a time subsequent to the one being spoken of. "Ancestry" means 'lineage' and is not appropriate in this sentence. If the option had the word 'ancestors', then it would have fit in the blank. Eliminate option 2. "Predecessors" means 'someone succeeded or replaced by someone else'. This fits contextually and therefore, is the correct answer.
Hence, the correct answer is option 4.

QUESTION: 31

Arrange the jumbled sentences in order.

A. Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.

B. She was usually spoken of as being remarkably clever, but with the addition that her sister Celia had more common-sense.

C. Her hand and wrist were so finely formed that she could wear sleeves not less bare of style than those in which the Blessed Virgin appeared to Italian painters.

D. And her profile as well as her stature and bearing seemed to gain more dignity from her plain garments, which by the side of provincial fashion gave her the impressiveness of a fine quotation from the Bible.

E. Nevertheless, Celia wore scarcely more trimmings; and it was only to close observers that her dress differed from her sister's, and had a shade of coquetry in its arrangements; for Miss Brooke's plain dressing was due to mixed conditions, in most of which her sister shared.

Solution:

The given sentences are centered around a certain Miss Brooke. The order of the statements must start with statement A, since C is not an appropriate opening statement. This eliminates options 3 and 4.
Statements C and D follow statement A since they describe Miss Brooke's physical appearance, and elaborate on “her beauty” mentioned in A. Statement B touches on her cleverness, which is a digression from the subject of her beauty. It cannot follow A. Eliminate option 2.
Statement B then discusses her intelligence and introduces her sister “Celia”.
Next, statement E should succeed statement B, since E further describes Celia (also, the sentence begins with the word “nevertheless”). This eliminates option 5.
Hence, the correct answer is option 1.

QUESTION: 32

Arrange the jumbled sentences in order.

A. Those who do not love California cannot understand her.

B. The Californian loves his state because his state loves him.

C. Hence, he is impatient of outside criticism.

D. To say that California is commercially asleep, that her industries are gambling ventures, that her local politics is in the hands of professional pickpockets and the like, all these statements, and others even more unpleasant, the Californian may admit in discussion, or may say for himself, but he does not find them acceptable from others.

E. He returns her love with a fierce affection that, to men who do not know California, is always a surprise.

Solution:

The passage discusses the typical Californian's love for the state and how he will not stand for any outside criticism. Sentence B puts this idea forth. Although it is an apt opening statement, statements A and D have also been mentioned in the options as introductory statements, and cannot be eliminated. We must examine the statements further in order to arrive at the correct sequence.
Sentences B and E have a direct association with each other, as they talk about how the Californian and his state love each other. Sentence E qualifies sentence B. The “outside criticism” aspect mentioned in Statement C ought to follow this order and not interrupt it. Eliminate options 1,4 and 5- they do not contain this BEC link.
Sentence A follows- it elaborates on the “outside criticism” from the non-Californian perspective. Sentence D says that while the Californian will acknowledge certain drawbacks of his state, he will by no means tolerate criticism of the same from others. This AD link is not found in option 3, hence, we can eliminate it.
Hence, the correct answer is option 2.

Similar Content

Related tests