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Practice Test for IIFT - 4


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110 Questions MCQ Test IIFT Mock Test Series | Practice Test for IIFT - 4

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 for CAT 2022 is part of IIFT Mock Test Series preparation. The Practice Test for IIFT - 4 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The Practice Test for IIFT - 4 MCQs are made for CAT 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 below.
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Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 1

In a class 10% of students play none of the three games: Cricket, Volleyball, Football. 25% play both cricket and football and 55% of students do not play football. 60% play cricket. What percentage of students play only volleyball?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 1

Given that h = 10%      ---(1)
            e + g = 25%     ---(2)
 a + d + c + h = 55%    ---(3)
 a + e + d + g = 60%    ---(4)
(4) – (2) ⇒ a + d = 35%
∴ (3) ⇒ 35 + c + h = 55
⇒ c + h = 20%
As h = 10% ⇒ c = 10%

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 2

In Bilaspur village, 12 men and 18 boys completed construction of a primary health centre in 60 days, by working for 7.5 hours a day. Subsequently the residents of the neighbouring Harigarh village also decided to construct a primary health centre in their locality, which would be twice the size of the facility built in Bilaspur. If a man is able to perform the work equal to the same done by 2 boys, then how many boys will be required to help 21 men to complete the work in Harigarh in 50 days, working 9 hours a day?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 2

1 men = 2 Boys
∴ 12 men = 24 Boys 
So 12 men + 18 boys are equivalent to 24 Boys + 18 Boys = 42 Boys
So in Second Case total number of boys required to do the twice work

So 21 Men i.e. 21 x 2 = 42 Boys Should be assisted by 84 - 42 = 42 Boys.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 3

Aniket and Animesh are two colleagues working in PQ Communications, and each of them earned an investible surplus of Rs.1,50,000/- during a certain  period. While Animesh is a risk-averse person,  Aniket prefers to go for higher return opportunities. Animesh uses his entire savings in Public Provident Fund (PPF) and National Saving Certificates (NSC). It is observed that one-third of the savings made by Animesh in PPF is equal to one-half of his savings in NSC. On the other hand, Aniket distributes his investible funds in share market, NSC and PPF. It is observed that his investments in share market exceeds his savings in NSC and PPF by Rs.20,000/- and Rs.40,000/-respectively. The difference between the amount invested in NSC by Animesh and Aniket is:

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 3

Details of investment by Animesh
Total = 150000,

⇒ Investment in PPF = 90000/- & Investment in NSC
= 60000/-
Details of investment by Aniket
Total = 150000
According To Question (Investment in Shares) = (Investment NSC + 20000) = (Investment PPF + 40000)
Investment in Shares = 70000
Investment in PPF = 30000
Investment in NSE = 50000
Reqd. Difference = 60000 – 50000 = 10000

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 4

In March 2011, EF Public Library purchased a total of 15 new books published in 2010 with a total expenditure of Rs. 4500. Of these books, 13 books were purchased from MN Distributors, while the remaining two were purchased from UV Publishers. It is observed that one-sixth of the average price of all the 15 books purchased is equal to one-fifth of the average price of the 13 books obtained from MN Distributors. Of the two books obtained from UV Publishers, if one-third of the price of one volume is equal to one-half of the price Of the other, then the price of the two books are:

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 4

Total Price = Rs. 4500/-

Total Price of 13 Books = 3250/-
Total Price of 2 Books = 1250/-

⇒ Price of Volume I = Rs. 750/-
Price of Volume II = Rs. 500/-

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 5

A rectangular piece of paper is 22 cm. long and 10 cm. wide. A cylinder is formed by rolling the paper along its length. Find the volume of the cylinder.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 5

Circumference of the base of cylinder :

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 6

Consider the volumes of the following objects and arrange them in decreasing order:

i. A rectangular parallelepiped of length 5 cm, breadth 3 cm and height 4 cm
ii. A cube of each side 4cm
iii. A cylinder of radius 3 cm and length 3 cm
iv. A sphere of radius 3 cm

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 6

(i) V = 5 x 3 x 4 = 60
(ii) V = 4 x 4 x 4 = 64
(iii) V = πR2H = 22 / 7 

So volumes in decreasing order are iv, iii, ii, i.
Hence the answer is option A

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 7

If x satisfies the inequality |x - 1| + |x - 2| + |x - 3| ≥ 6, then:

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 7

|x - 1 | + |x- 2| + |x-3| ≥ 6
Now, consider the following cases.

Case1: (x < 1)
In this case, x - 1, x - 2 and x - 3 all are negative.
∴ |x - 1| + |x-2| + |x - 3| = 1 - x + 2 - x + 3 - x
= 6 - 3x ≥ 6
∴ x < 0. which is possible.

Case ll : (l ≤ x ≤ 2)
In this case, only x - 2. and x - 3 are negative.
Hence. |x - 1| + |x - 2| + |x - 3| = x - 1 + 2 - x + 3 - x ≥ 6
= 4 - x ≥ 6
∴ x ≤ - 2 This is not possible.

Hence there is no solution in this range.

Case III: (2 ≤ x ≤ 3) In this case, only x - 3 is negative.
Hence. |x - 1| + | x - 2 | + | x - 3 | = x - 1 + x - 2 + 3 - x ≥ 6
= x ≥ 6 This also is not possible.

Case IV: (x ≥ 3) In this case, all are positive.
Hence. |x - 1| + |x - 2| + |x - 3| = 3x - 6 ≥ 6
∴ x ≥ 4 This is possible.
Hence, the required range is x ≤ 0 and x ≥ 4 Hence, option 2.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 8

A bag contains 8 red and 6 blue balls. If 5 balls are drawn at random, what is the probability that 3 of them are red and 2 are blue?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 8

Number of ways of selecting 3 red balls = 8C3
Number of ways of selecting 2 blue balls = 6C2

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 9

A solid metal sphere is melted and smaller sphere of equal radii are formed. 10% of the volumeof the sphere is lost in the process. The smaller spheres have a radius, that is l/9th the largersphere. If 10 litres of paint was needed to paint the larger sphere, how many litresis need topaint all the smaller spheres?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 9

Let radius of larger sphere and smaller sphere be R and r

►Volume of larger sphere=4 / 3 × pi × R3

►Volume of sphere left= .9 × 4 / 3 × pi × R3

►Volume of smaller sphere =4 / 3 × pi × r3
Put r = R / 9

►Total number of spheres = .9 × 4 / 3 × pi × R/   4 / 3 × pi × (R / 9)= 729 × .9

►Surface area of larger sphere = 4 × pi × R2

►Surface area of smaller sphere = 4 × pi × R2 / 81

►Surface area of all smaller spheres = 729 ×.9 × 4 × pi × R2 / 81 = 8.1 × 4 × pi × R2

►Therefore ratio of surface area of all the smaller spheres to the big sphere = (8.1 × 4 × pi × R2) / (4 × pi × R2) = 8.1 : 1
So Answer will be 8.1 × 10 = 81

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 10

A man is walking towards a street light pole such that his shadow that makes an angle of depression of 30° with the ground, measures 150√3  cm. The height of the street light pole is 600 cm. How far is the man from the pole after crossing it, if the shadow (ahead of him) makes an angle of depression of 60° with the ground?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 10

Let AB be the length of the street light pole as shown in the figure below.
Also FE is the height of the man = GH (after crossing as shown.) = x (suppose)

Now in triangle DEF, tan 30° (=1/√3) = FE/DE
Given, DE (shadow behind the man) = 150√3 cm,
So FE = x = 150 cm = GH
Now, in triangle GHC, tan 60° (=√3) = GH/HC
So, HC = GH / √3 = 50√3 cm
Now, consider triangle ABC, tan 60° (= √3) = AB/BC
Since AB (height of the pole) = 600cm
So, BC = 600 / √3 = 200√3 cm
Now required value BH (distance from the pole after crossing) = BC – HC = 150√3 cm

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 11

There are three cities A, B and C. Each of these cities is connected with the other two cities by at least one direct road. If a traveler wants to go from one city to another city she can do so either by traversing a road connecting the two cities directly, or by traversing two roads, the first connecting the origin to the third city and the second connecting the third city to the destination. In all there are 33 routes from A to B. Similarly there are 23 routes from B to C. How many roads are there from A to C directly?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 11

Let number of direct roads between A and B be x, that between B and C be y and that between A and C be z.

►Then x + yz = 33,y + xz = 23

►So x + yz + y + xz = 56

►(x + y)(1 + z) = 56 ......... (1)

and (x – y ) (1 - z) = 10 ...... (2)

►Now substitute values of z in these equations from the options and see which yield integer values of x and y.

►Only for z = 6, x = 3 and y = 5, do we satisfy both the equations with integer values

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 12

An insurance company earns Rs. 250 per person as annual premium for MEDICLAIM insurance that covers hospitalization bill up to Rs. 18,900 at the rate of 80% of actual bills. It is estimated that only 1 out of every 100 insured persons would incur the hospitalization bill of Rs.15, 000. This scheme costs the insurance company 10% of the revenue as administrative cost. In the situation given above, if instead of 1, 1.6 out of hundred incur hospitalization bills and the company wants to maintain its profit per person, how much should be the premium charged?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 12

As the firm wants to maintain same profit per person, let us first calculate the profit for 100 persons.

►If there are 100 persons the revenue collected will be 100* 250 = 25000.

►Out of this there will be 1 claim of 80% of 15000, that is Rs. 12000.

►Besides that the administrative cost will be 10% of 25000 i.e. Rs. 2500.

►Thus the profit will be 25000 - 12000 - 2500 = 10500.

►Instead of 1, 1.6 people incur a hospitalization bill.

►So cost of insurance firm = 12000 × 1.6 = 19200

►Now let the total amount of annual premium be x

►Therefore Total cost of the firm = 19200 + 0.1x

►Since the firm wants to maintain same profit per person, therefore 
x – (19200 0.1x) = 10500
0.9x = 29700  →   x = 33000

►Therefore premium to be charged per person if the firm wants to maintain the same level of profit
= 33000 / 100 = 330

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 13

Ajay has a watch that loses 20 min a day. This watch is unique in the sense that it shows date also along with the time. If his watch shows 12 pm on 14th March when actual time is 12 am 15th March, when was his watch 12 hours ahead of the actual time (Given it is not a leap year)?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 13

The watch loses 20 min in 1 day so 1 hour in 3 days.

►So it loses 12 hours in 36 days.

►So his watch was correct 36 days ago.

►It will be 12 hours ahead even 36 days before that.

►So 72 days before 15th March is 2nd Jan.

►Thus answer is 2nd Jan. Option 1st is the answer.

►If you think that answer is 26th May, then keep in mind that the watch is losing time, so on the 26th May, it was 12 hours behind actual time.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 14

2 / 3rd of the balls in a bag are black, the rest are red. If 5 / 9th of the black balls and 7 / 8th of the red balls are defective, find the total number of balls in the bag, if the number of non-defective balls is 146.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 14

If the total number of balls in the bag is x, then (2x / 3) x (4 / 9) + (x / 3) x (1 / 8) = 146.

It becomes (8x / 27) + (x / 24) = 146. Solving, x = 432.
Hence 2nd option.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 15

There are 10 different fruits and 5 different vegetables. A grocer has to choose 3 fruits and 2 vegetables. In all the possible selections he can make, what is the number of selections in which a particular fruit and a particular vegetable are always there?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 15

A particular fruit and a vegetable will appear in 9C4C1 selections. 9 x 8 x 4 2 = 144 selections.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 16

In a school every student takes at least one subject among History and Physics. One fourth of the total students and 11 more took History only. One fifth of the total students and 12 more took Physics only. The remaining 120 students took both the subjects. Find the number of students in the school.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 16

Let the total students are x.

We have

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 17

Two teams participating in a competition had to take a test in a given time. Team B chose the easier test with 300 questions, and team A the difficult test with 10% less questions. Team A completed the test 3 hours before schedule while team B completed it 6 hours before schedule. If team B answered 7 questions more than team A per hour, how many questions did team A answer per hour?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 17

Number of questions in the test taken by team A = 270

►Let team A answer x number of questions/hour for y hours

►Then xy = 270. Team B answers x + 7 questions for y - 3 hours

►Hence, (x + 7)(y – 3) = 300. Thus x = 18 and y = 15 or team A answers 18 questions per hour.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 18

A line is drawn from top left corner to the bottom right corner of a rectangle ABCD making it into two triangles, Area 1 and 2. Then,

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 18

A rectangle when divided by its diagonal will always be broken down into two equal triangles.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 19

The diameter of the smaller circle is equal to the side of a square and the diagonal of this square is equal to the diameter of the bigger circle. The area of the smaller circle to the bigger circle is in the ratio:

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 19

Let diameter of smaller circle = a = side of square

►so diagonal of square = a√2 = diameter of bigger circle

►Area of smaller circle = πa2 and area of bigger circle  = π(a√2)2

►Required ratio = πa2 : π(a√2)2 = 1 : 2

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 20

By what least number 21, 600 should be multiplied to make it a perfect cube?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 20

Resolving 21600 = 63 x 102.

The no. required to make it a perfect cube = 10.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 21

Jack speaks the truth in 1 / 4th cases and Jill lies in 2 / 5th cases. What is the percentage of cases in which both Jack and Jill contradict each other in stating a fact? (The answers can only be “yes” or “no”)

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 21

Jack and Jill will contradict each other when one speaks the truth and the other lies.

Probability that Jack and Jill contradict each other = (1 / 4 × 2 / 5) + (3 / 4 × 3 / 5) = 1 / 10  +  9 / 20 = 11 / 20 =  55% .

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 22

If log4­­ (x – 3) = 1 – log4 (x – 6), what is the value of x?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 22

log4­­ (x – 3) + log4 (x – 6) = 1
⇒ log (x – 3)(x – 6) = 1
⇒ x2 – 9x + 18 = 4
⇒ x2 – 9x + 14 = 0.

►Solving this quadratic yields roots as x = 2 and x = 7.

►If we substitute x = 2, we end up calculating the log of a negative number, which is not defined.

►Thus, x = 7 is the only possibility.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 23

The sum of the reciprocals of the ages of two colleagues is five times the difference of the reciprocals of their ages. If the ratio of the product of their ages to the sum of their ages is 14.4 : 1, the age (in years) of one of the colleagues must be between (both inclusive) ________

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 23

Let age of Istx and age of IIndy

►Hence  1 / x + 1 / y = 5 (1 / x – 1 / y) => 3x = 2y …………..(1)

►Also xy / (x + y) =  14.4 …………………..(2)

►Solving (1) and (2) we get x = 24 and y = 36.  Hence option 2.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 24

A cyclist completes first half of his journey at the rate of 10 km/h and second half at increasing his speed by 50%. The average speed of whole journey is

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 24

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 25

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the following question and mark the best possible option.

Ghosh Babu deposited a certain sum of money in a bank in 1986. The bank calculated interest on the principal at 10 percent simple interest, and credited it to the account once a year. After the 1st year, Ghosh Babu withdrew the entire interest and 20% of the initial amount. After the 2nd year, he withdrew the interest and 50% of the remaining amount. After the 3rd year, he withdrew the interest and 50% of the remaining amount. Finally after the 4th year, Ghosh Babu closed the account and collected the entire balance of Rs. 11,000.

Q. The year, at the end of which, Ghosh Babu withdrew the smallest amount was:

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 25

Let us assume that Ghosh Babu had deposited Rs. 100 initially.

Hence, had he deposited Rs.100 initially, he should have withdrawn Rs.22 at the end to close the account.
He withdrew the smallest amount after the 4th year(from above table)

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 26

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
We are well into the 21st century yet half the world's population live in squatter settlements and work in shadow economies, which generate more than one-third of the developing world's GDP. Slums are not caused by the poor but by governments denying people the right to own and exchange property. When people own their own property they have incentives to invest time, money and energy to improve it because they know that they will be able to benefit from any such improvements, i.e. the ability to obtain mortgages etc. In short, property rights beget capital, which begets innovation, which begets wealth. Sadly, the poor typically don't have secure title to their land as there are bureaucratic restrictions on transferring title or there is no clear system for titling. Without legal deeds they live in constant fear of being evicted by landlords or municipal officials. Illiteracy is a major reason poor people often choose not to seek the protection of local courts since in so many countries laws established under colonial rule have never been translated into local languages. When entrepreneurs do set out to legally register business they are discouraged by red tape and costly fees. In Egypt, starting a bakery takes 500 days, compliance with 315 laws and 27 times the monthly minimum wage. The proprietors of such businesses cannot get loans, enforce contracts or expand a personal network of familiar customers and partners. As a result the poor have no choice but to accept insecurity and instability as a way of life.
In India severe restrictions on free transfer of property in most rural areas inhibit investment and encourage urban flight. Planning policies however discourage building homes for these migrants as numerous homes are destroyed if they do not comply with planning rules, essentially forcing people to live in slums and perversely blaming it on population growth. UN Habitat, the UN agency for housing the poor, has implemented more plans to stabilise the unplanned aspects of urban growth but grandiose plans like UN Schemes and government housing projects simply ignore or worsen the underlying problems. It is when governments grant people legal means to control their assets that they empower them to invest and plan ahead. In Buenos Aires, economists studied the experience of two Argentine communities. One had received legal title to its land in the 1980s and surpassed the other group which had not, in a range of social indicators including quality of house construction and education levels. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor - a UN -affiliated initiative made up of two dozen leaders - is exploring ideas to extend enforceable legal rights to impoverished members of society and is seeking to bring about a consensus on incentives for national and local leaders. As the growth of illegal settlements amply demonstrates, the poor are not helpless, all they need is governments to grant them fundamental human rights of freedom and responsibility.

Q. What did the Argentine study indicate?
A. Argentina's economy is booming and the percentage of poor has fallen.
B. When the government gives people the legal means to control their assets they plan for the future.
C. The Government succeeded in widening the gap between the rich and the poor.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 26

Refer to the study done by the economists in Buenos Aires ''It is when governments grant people legal means to control their assets that they empower them to invest and plan ahead. In Buenos Aires, economists studied the experience of two Argentine communities. One had received legal title to its land in the 1980s and surpassed the other group which had not, in a range of social indicators including quality of house construction and education levels'' and it is clearly stated when government gives right to people to control their assets, they plan for the future and this is how the difference was visible between the two groups of people/section of the society as per the study.
Statement C is factually wrong as the gap increased when the right to control the property was given to one set of people in comparison to other set of the people.
As the study was not done to check the validity of statement A, therefore this statement is also rejected. 

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 27

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
We are well into the 21st century yet half the world's population live in squatter settlements and work in shadow economies, which generate more than one-third of the developing world's GDP. Slums are not caused by the poor but by governments denying people the right to own and exchange property. When people own their own property they have incentives to invest time, money and energy to improve it because they know that they will be able to benefit from any such improvements, i.e. the ability to obtain mortgages etc. In short, property rights beget capital, which begets innovation, which begets wealth. Sadly, the poor typically don't have secure title to their land as there are bureaucratic restrictions on transferring title or there is no clear system for titling. Without legal deeds they live in constant fear of being evicted by landlords or municipal officials. Illiteracy is a major reason poor people often choose not to seek the protection of local courts since in so many countries laws established under colonial rule have never been translated into local languages. When entrepreneurs do set out to legally register business they are discouraged by red tape and costly fees. In Egypt, starting a bakery takes 500 days, compliance with 315 laws and 27 times the monthly minimum wage. The proprietors of such businesses cannot get loans, enforce contracts or expand a personal network of familiar customers and partners. As a result the poor have no choice but to accept insecurity and instability as a way of life.
In India severe restrictions on free transfer of property in most rural areas inhibit investment and encourage urban flight. Planning policies however discourage building homes for these migrants as numerous homes are destroyed if they do not comply with planning rules, essentially forcing people to live in slums and perversely blaming it on population growth. UN Habitat, the UN agency for housing the poor, has implemented more plans to stabilise the unplanned aspects of urban growth but grandiose plans like UN Schemes and government housing projects simply ignore or worsen the underlying problems. It is when governments grant people legal means to control their assets that they empower them to invest and plan ahead. In Buenos Aires, economists studied the experience of two Argentine communities. One had received legal title to its land in the 1980s and surpassed the other group which had not, in a range of social indicators including quality of house construction and education levels. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor - a UN -affiliated initiative made up of two dozen leaders - is exploring ideas to extend enforceable legal rights to impoverished members of society and is seeking to bring about a consensus on incentives for national and local leaders. As the growth of illegal settlements amply demonstrates, the poor are not helpless, all they need is governments to grant them fundamental human rights of freedom and responsibility.

Q. According to the author, which of the following factors is responsible for the creation of a slum?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 27

As per the lines from the first para ''Slums are not caused by the poor but by governments denying people the right to own and exchange property. When people own their own property they have incentives to invest time, money and energy to improve it because they know that they will be able to benefit from any such improvements, i.e. the ability to obtain mortgages etc. In short, property rights beget capital, which begets innovation, which begets wealth'', it is clear that it is government fault or policy failure ,which results into growth of slums and not the poverty as assumed by most of the institutions.
There is mention of migration of poor resulting into the increase of slums in urban area as per the passage but it  is not one of the reasons as the reason is that these poor people are not allowed to invest in or build homes as per the faulty policies of government, hence option A rejected. Option C is one of the excuses and not the main reason for increase in slums and therefore rejected.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 28

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
We are well into the 21st century yet half the world's population live in squatter settlements and work in shadow economies, which generate more than one-third of the developing world's GDP. Slums are not caused by the poor but by governments denying people the right to own and exchange property. When people own their own property they have incentives to invest time, money and energy to improve it because they know that they will be able to benefit from any such improvements, i.e. the ability to obtain mortgages etc. In short, property rights beget capital, which begets innovation, which begets wealth. Sadly, the poor typically don't have secure title to their land as there are bureaucratic restrictions on transferring title or there is no clear system for titling. Without legal deeds they live in constant fear of being evicted by landlords or municipal officials. Illiteracy is a major reason poor people often choose not to seek the protection of local courts since in so many countries laws established under colonial rule have never been translated into local languages. When entrepreneurs do set out to legally register business they are discouraged by red tape and costly fees. In Egypt, starting a bakery takes 500 days, compliance with 315 laws and 27 times the monthly minimum wage. The proprietors of such businesses cannot get loans, enforce contracts or expand a personal network of familiar customers and partners. As a result the poor have no choice but to accept insecurity and instability as a way of life.
In India severe restrictions on free transfer of property in most rural areas inhibit investment and encourage urban flight. Planning policies however discourage building homes for these migrants as numerous homes are destroyed if they do not comply with planning rules, essentially forcing people to live in slums and perversely blaming it on population growth. UN Habitat, the UN agency for housing the poor, has implemented more plans to stabilise the unplanned aspects of urban growth but grandiose plans like UN Schemes and government housing projects simply ignore or worsen the underlying problems. It is when governments grant people legal means to control their assets that they empower them to invest and plan ahead. In Buenos Aires, economists studied the experience of two Argentine communities. One had received legal title to its land in the 1980s and surpassed the other group which had not, in a range of social indicators including quality of house construction and education levels. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor - a UN -affiliated initiative made up of two dozen leaders - is exploring ideas to extend enforceable legal rights to impoverished members of society and is seeking to bring about a consensus on incentives for national and local leaders. As the growth of illegal settlements amply demonstrates, the poor are not helpless, all they need is governments to grant them fundamental human rights of freedom and responsibility.

Q. The author's main objective in writing the passage is to

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 28

This is a natural corollary to the question above as it is clear from the lines ''As the growth of illegal settlements amply demonstrates, the poor are not helpless, all they need is governments to grant them fundamental human rights of freedom and responsibility'' the writer''s main purpose is to convince the governments to help poor people in granting their due rights to control their assets so that they can plan for the future. This is one of the surest ways to generate wealth and hence other aspects of economy. Option A is one of the secondary ideas. Option B is one of the far fetched inference and not the main idea of the passage.Option D is not clearly mentioned so it can''t be the main idea.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 29

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
We are well into the 21st century yet half the world's population live in squatter settlements and work in shadow economies, which generate more than one-third of the developing world's GDP. Slums are not caused by the poor but by governments denying people the right to own and exchange property. When people own their own property they have incentives to invest time, money and energy to improve it because they know that they will be able to benefit from any such improvements, i.e. the ability to obtain mortgages etc. In short, property rights beget capital, which begets innovation, which begets wealth. Sadly, the poor typically don't have secure title to their land as there are bureaucratic restrictions on transferring title or there is no clear system for titling. Without legal deeds they live in constant fear of being evicted by landlords or municipal officials. Illiteracy is a major reason poor people often choose not to seek the protection of local courts since in so many countries laws established under colonial rule have never been translated into local languages. When entrepreneurs do set out to legally register business they are discouraged by red tape and costly fees. In Egypt, starting a bakery takes 500 days, compliance with 315 laws and 27 times the monthly minimum wage. The proprietors of such businesses cannot get loans, enforce contracts or expand a personal network of familiar customers and partners. As a result the poor have no choice but to accept insecurity and instability as a way of life.
In India severe restrictions on free transfer of property in most rural areas inhibit investment and encourage urban flight. Planning policies however discourage building homes for these migrants as numerous homes are destroyed if they do not comply with planning rules, essentially forcing people to live in slums and perversely blaming it on population growth. UN Habitat, the UN agency for housing the poor, has implemented more plans to stabilise the unplanned aspects of urban growth but grandiose plans like UN Schemes and government housing projects simply ignore or worsen the underlying problems. It is when governments grant people legal means to control their assets that they empower them to invest and plan ahead. In Buenos Aires, economists studied the experience of two Argentine communities. One had received legal title to its land in the 1980s and surpassed the other group which had not, in a range of social indicators including quality of house construction and education levels. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor - a UN -affiliated initiative made up of two dozen leaders - is exploring ideas to extend enforceable legal rights to impoverished members of society and is seeking to bring about a consensus on incentives for national and local leaders. As the growth of illegal settlements amply demonstrates, the poor are not helpless, all they need is governments to grant them fundamental human rights of freedom and responsibility.

Q. What benefit does the author see in providing land ownership rights to the poor?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 29

It will empower the poor to invest and plan ahead and it is very clear from the lines ''When people own their own property they have incentives to invest time, money and energy to improve it because they know that they will be able to benefit from any such improvements, i.e. the ability to obtain mortgages etc. In short, property rights beget capital, which begets innovation, which begets wealth'' so it will increase the GDP. So, Option A is appropriate.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 30

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
The tale of reading begins when the retina receives photons reflected off the written page. But the retina is not a homogeneous sensor. Only its central part, called the fovea, is dense in high-resolution cells sensitive to incoming light, while the rest of the retina has a coarser resolution. The fovea, which occupies about 15 degrees of the visual field, is the only part of the retina that is genuinely useful for reading. When foveal information is lacking, whether due to a retinal lesion, to a stroke having destroyed the central part of the visual cortex, or to an experimental trick that selectively blocks visual inputs to the fovea, reading becomes impossible."
The need to bring words into the fovea explains why our eyes are in constant motion when we read. By orienting our gaze, we "scan" text with the most sensitive part of our vision, the only one that has the resolution needed to determine letters. However, our eyes do not travel continuously across the page.' Quite the opposite: they move in small steps called saccades. At this very moment, you are making four or five of these jerky movements every second, in order to bring new information to your fovea. Even within the fovea, visual information is not represented with the same precision at all points. In the retina as well as in the subsequent visual relays of the thalamus and of the cortex, the number of cells allocated to a given portion of the visual scene decreases progressively as one moves away from the center of gaze. This causes a gradual loss of visual precision. Visual accuracy is optimal at the center and smoothly decreases toward the periphery. We have the illusion of seeing the whole scene in front of us with the same fixed accuracy, as if it were filmed by a digital camera with a homogeneous array of pixels. However, unlike the camera, our eye sensor accurately perceives only the precise point where our gaze happens to land. The surroundings are lost in an increasingly hazy blurriness
One might think that, under these conditions, it is the absolute size of printed characters that determines the ease with which we can read: small letters should be harder to read than larger ones. Oddly enough, however, this is not the case. The reason is that the larger the characters, the more room they use on the retina. When a whole word is printed in larger letters, it moves into the periphery of the retina, where even large letters are hard to discern. The two factors compensate for each other almost exactly, so that an enormous word and a minuscule one are essentially equivalent from the point of view of retinal precision. Of course, this is only true provided that the size of the characters remains larger than an absolute minimum, which corresponds to the maximal precision attained at the center of our fovea. When visual acuity is diminished, for instance in aging patients, it is quite logical to recommend books in large print .Our eyes impose a lot of constraints on the act of reading. The structure of our visual sensors forces us to scan the page by jerking our eyes around every two or three tenths of a second Reading is nothing but the word-by-word mental restitution of a text through a series of snapshots. 'file some small grammatical words like "the," "it or "is" can sometimes be skipped, almost all content words such as nouns and verbs have to be fixated at least once.
These constraints are an integral part of our visual apparatus and cannot be lifted by training. One can certainly teach people to optimize their eye movements patterns, but most good readers, who read four hundred words per minute, are already close to optimal. Given the retinal sensor at our disposal, it is probably not possible to do much better. A simple demonstration proves that eye movements are the rate-limiting step in reading. If a full sentence is presented, word by word, at the precise point where gaze is focalized, thus avoiding the need for eye movements, a good reader can read five hundred words per minute at staggering speed-a mean of eight hundred words per minute, and up to sixteen hundred words per minute for the best readers, is about one word every forty milliseconds and three to four times faster than normal reading! With this method, called rapid sequential visual presentation, or RSVP, identification and comprehension remain satisfactory, thus suggesting that the duration of those central steps does not impose a strong constraint on normal reading. Perhaps this computerized presentation mode represents the future of reading in a world where screens progressively replace paper.
At any rate, as long as text is presented in pages and lines, acquisition through gaze will slow reading and impose an unavoidable limitation. Thus, fast reading methods that advertise gains in reading speed of up to one thousand words per minute or more must be viewed with skepticism. One can no doubt broaden one's visual span somewhat, in order to reduce the number of saccades per line, and it is also possible to learn to avoid moments of regression, where gaze backtracks to the words it has just read. However, the physical limits of the eyes cannot be overcome, unless one is willing to skip words and thus run the risk of a misunderstanding. Woody Allen described this situation perfectly: "I took a speed-reading course and was able to read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It involves Russia."

Q. Why does the author recommend books in larger print for old people?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 30

Refer to the lines 11-15  of the third para"When visual acuity......large print". A word printed in larger letters moves into the periphery of the retina and thus it is hard to discern for the eye. Therefore option A is false. Option B is not true as smaller and larger letters are different for the retina. Option C seems to be the best answer. Option D is factually wrong.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 31

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
The tale of reading begins when the retina receives photons reflected off the written page. But the retina is not a homogeneous sensor. Only its central part, called the fovea, is dense in high-resolution cells sensitive to incoming light, while the rest of the retina has a coarser resolution. The fovea, which occupies about 15 degrees of the visual field, is the only part of the retina that is genuinely useful for reading. When foveal information is lacking, whether due to a retinal lesion, to a stroke having destroyed the central part of the visual cortex, or to an experimental trick that selectively blocks visual inputs to the fovea, reading becomes impossible."
The need to bring words into the fovea explains why our eyes are in constant motion when we read. By orienting our gaze, we "scan" text with the most sensitive part of our vision, the only one that has the resolution needed to determine letters. However, our eyes do not travel continuously across the page.' Quite the opposite: they move in small steps called saccades. At this very moment, you are making four or five of these jerky movements every second, in order to bring new information to your fovea. Even within the fovea, visual information is not represented with the same precision at all points. In the retina as well as in the subsequent visual relays of the thalamus and of the cortex, the number of cells allocated to a given portion of the visual scene decreases progressively as one moves away from the center of gaze. This causes a gradual loss of visual precision. Visual accuracy is optimal at the center and smoothly decreases toward the periphery. We have the illusion of seeing the whole scene in front of us with the same fixed accuracy, as if it were filmed by a digital camera with a homogeneous array of pixels. However, unlike the camera, our eye sensor accurately perceives only the precise point where our gaze happens to land. The surroundings are lost in an increasingly hazy blurriness
One might think that, under these conditions, it is the absolute size of printed characters that determines the ease with which we can read: small letters should be harder to read than larger ones. Oddly enough, however, this is not the case. The reason is that the larger the characters, the more room they use on the retina. When a whole word is printed in larger letters, it moves into the periphery of the retina, where even large letters are hard to discern. The two factors compensate for each other almost exactly, so that an enormous word and a minuscule one are essentially equivalent from the point of view of retinal precision. Of course, this is only true provided that the size of the characters remains larger than an absolute minimum, which corresponds to the maximal precision attained at the center of our fovea. When visual acuity is diminished, for instance in aging patients, it is quite logical to recommend books in large print .Our eyes impose a lot of constraints on the act of reading. The structure of our visual sensors forces us to scan the page by jerking our eyes around every two or three tenths of a second Reading is nothing but the word-by-word mental restitution of a text through a series of snapshots. 'file some small grammatical words like "the," "it or "is" can sometimes be skipped, almost all content words such as nouns and verbs have to be fixated at least once.
These constraints are an integral part of our visual apparatus and cannot be lifted by training. One can certainly teach people to optimize their eye movements patterns, but most good readers, who read four hundred words per minute, are already close to optimal. Given the retinal sensor at our disposal, it is probably not possible to do much better. A simple demonstration proves that eye movements are the rate-limiting step in reading. If a full sentence is presented, word by word, at the precise point where gaze is focalized, thus avoiding the need for eye movements, a good reader can read five hundred words per minute at staggering speed-a mean of eight hundred words per minute, and up to sixteen hundred words per minute for the best readers, is about one word every forty milliseconds and three to four times faster than normal reading! With this method, called rapid sequential visual presentation, or RSVP, identification and comprehension remain satisfactory, thus suggesting that the duration of those central steps does not impose a strong constraint on normal reading. Perhaps this computerized presentation mode represents the future of reading in a world where screens progressively replace paper.
At any rate, as long as text is presented in pages and lines, acquisition through gaze will slow reading and impose an unavoidable limitation. Thus, fast reading methods that advertise gains in reading speed of up to one thousand words per minute or more must be viewed with skepticism. One can no doubt broaden one's visual span somewhat, in order to reduce the number of saccades per line, and it is also possible to learn to avoid moments of regression, where gaze backtracks to the words it has just read. However, the physical limits of the eyes cannot be overcome, unless one is willing to skip words and thus run the risk of a misunderstanding. Woody Allen described this situation perfectly: "I took a speed-reading course and was able to read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It involves Russia."

Q. What can be inferred regarding the evolvement of reading in the coming times?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 31

Refer to the last sentence of the second last para "Perhaps...replace paper." Option B represents a twisted form of the given information in the passage. Option A is only partially correct. Its first half is correct but in the second half, wherein it states that there is no loss of comprehension, the option commits a mistake and goes against the passage. Option D is irrelevant and was nowhere mentioned in the passage.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 32

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
The tale of reading begins when the retina receives photons reflected off the written page. But the retina is not a homogeneous sensor. Only its central part, called the fovea, is dense in high-resolution cells sensitive to incoming light, while the rest of the retina has a coarser resolution. The fovea, which occupies about 15 degrees of the visual field, is the only part of the retina that is genuinely useful for reading. When foveal information is lacking, whether due to a retinal lesion, to a stroke having destroyed the central part of the visual cortex, or to an experimental trick that selectively blocks visual inputs to the fovea, reading becomes impossible."
The need to bring words into the fovea explains why our eyes are in constant motion when we read. By orienting our gaze, we "scan" text with the most sensitive part of our vision, the only one that has the resolution needed to determine letters. However, our eyes do not travel continuously across the page.' Quite the opposite: they move in small steps called saccades. At this very moment, you are making four or five of these jerky movements every second, in order to bring new information to your fovea. Even within the fovea, visual information is not represented with the same precision at all points. In the retina as well as in the subsequent visual relays of the thalamus and of the cortex, the number of cells allocated to a given portion of the visual scene decreases progressively as one moves away from the center of gaze. This causes a gradual loss of visual precision. Visual accuracy is optimal at the center and smoothly decreases toward the periphery. We have the illusion of seeing the whole scene in front of us with the same fixed accuracy, as if it were filmed by a digital camera with a homogeneous array of pixels. However, unlike the camera, our eye sensor accurately perceives only the precise point where our gaze happens to land. The surroundings are lost in an increasingly hazy blurriness
One might think that, under these conditions, it is the absolute size of printed characters that determines the ease with which we can read: small letters should be harder to read than larger ones. Oddly enough, however, this is not the case. The reason is that the larger the characters, the more room they use on the retina. When a whole word is printed in larger letters, it moves into the periphery of the retina, where even large letters are hard to discern. The two factors compensate for each other almost exactly, so that an enormous word and a minuscule one are essentially equivalent from the point of view of retinal precision. Of course, this is only true provided that the size of the characters remains larger than an absolute minimum, which corresponds to the maximal precision attained at the center of our fovea. When visual acuity is diminished, for instance in aging patients, it is quite logical to recommend books in large print .Our eyes impose a lot of constraints on the act of reading. The structure of our visual sensors forces us to scan the page by jerking our eyes around every two or three tenths of a second Reading is nothing but the word-by-word mental restitution of a text through a series of snapshots. 'file some small grammatical words like "the," "it or "is" can sometimes be skipped, almost all content words such as nouns and verbs have to be fixated at least once.
These constraints are an integral part of our visual apparatus and cannot be lifted by training. One can certainly teach people to optimize their eye movements patterns, but most good readers, who read four hundred words per minute, are already close to optimal. Given the retinal sensor at our disposal, it is probably not possible to do much better. A simple demonstration proves that eye movements are the rate-limiting step in reading. If a full sentence is presented, word by word, at the precise point where gaze is focalized, thus avoiding the need for eye movements, a good reader can read five hundred words per minute at staggering speed-a mean of eight hundred words per minute, and up to sixteen hundred words per minute for the best readers, is about one word every forty milliseconds and three to four times faster than normal reading! With this method, called rapid sequential visual presentation, or RSVP, identification and comprehension remain satisfactory, thus suggesting that the duration of those central steps does not impose a strong constraint on normal reading. Perhaps this computerized presentation mode represents the future of reading in a world where screens progressively replace paper.
At any rate, as long as text is presented in pages and lines, acquisition through gaze will slow reading and impose an unavoidable limitation. Thus, fast reading methods that advertise gains in reading speed of up to one thousand words per minute or more must be viewed with skepticism. One can no doubt broaden one's visual span somewhat, in order to reduce the number of saccades per line, and it is also possible to learn to avoid moments of regression, where gaze backtracks to the words it has just read. However, the physical limits of the eyes cannot be overcome, unless one is willing to skip words and thus run the risk of a misunderstanding. Woody Allen described this situation perfectly: "I took a speed-reading course and was able to read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It involves Russia."

Q. According to the passage, which of the following option(s) determines the rate of reading?
(i) Our perceptual abilities which exclusively depend on the number of letters in the words not space these words occupy on our retina.
(ii) The requirement of moving the gaze across the page.
(iii) Twitching of our eyes while reading the text.
(iv) The requirement of maintaining a fixed gaze on the page without any eye movement.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 32

Statement (i) is nowhere mentioned in the passage whereas statement (iv) is false as per the information given in the passage. Refer to the first 5-6 line of the 2nd para .Both the statements (ii) and (iii) are mentioned in 2nd paragraph.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 33

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.
The tale of reading begins when the retina receives photons reflected off the written page. But the retina is not a homogeneous sensor. Only its central part, called the fovea, is dense in high-resolution cells sensitive to incoming light, while the rest of the retina has a coarser resolution. The fovea, which occupies about 15 degrees of the visual field, is the only part of the retina that is genuinely useful for reading. When foveal information is lacking, whether due to a retinal lesion, to a stroke having destroyed the central part of the visual cortex, or to an experimental trick that selectively blocks visual inputs to the fovea, reading becomes impossible."
The need to bring words into the fovea explains why our eyes are in constant motion when we read. By orienting our gaze, we "scan" text with the most sensitive part of our vision, the only one that has the resolution needed to determine letters. However, our eyes do not travel continuously across the page.' Quite the opposite: they move in small steps called saccades. At this very moment, you are making four or five of these jerky movements every second, in order to bring new information to your fovea. Even within the fovea, visual information is not represented with the same precision at all points. In the retina as well as in the subsequent visual relays of the thalamus and of the cortex, the number of cells allocated to a given portion of the visual scene decreases progressively as one moves away from the center of gaze. This causes a gradual loss of visual precision. Visual accuracy is optimal at the center and smoothly decreases toward the periphery. We have the illusion of seeing the whole scene in front of us with the same fixed accuracy, as if it were filmed by a digital camera with a homogeneous array of pixels. However, unlike the camera, our eye sensor accurately perceives only the precise point where our gaze happens to land. The surroundings are lost in an increasingly hazy blurriness
One might think that, under these conditions, it is the absolute size of printed characters that determines the ease with which we can read: small letters should be harder to read than larger ones. Oddly enough, however, this is not the case. The reason is that the larger the characters, the more room they use on the retina. When a whole word is printed in larger letters, it moves into the periphery of the retina, where even large letters are hard to discern. The two factors compensate for each other almost exactly, so that an enormous word and a minuscule one are essentially equivalent from the point of view of retinal precision. Of course, this is only true provided that the size of the characters remains larger than an absolute minimum, which corresponds to the maximal precision attained at the center of our fovea. When visual acuity is diminished, for instance in aging patients, it is quite logical to recommend books in large print .Our eyes impose a lot of constraints on the act of reading. The structure of our visual sensors forces us to scan the page by jerking our eyes around every two or three tenths of a second Reading is nothing but the word-by-word mental restitution of a text through a series of snapshots. 'file some small grammatical words like "the," "it or "is" can sometimes be skipped, almost all content words such as nouns and verbs have to be fixated at least once.
These constraints are an integral part of our visual apparatus and cannot be lifted by training. One can certainly teach people to optimize their eye movements patterns, but most good readers, who read four hundred words per minute, are already close to optimal. Given the retinal sensor at our disposal, it is probably not possible to do much better. A simple demonstration proves that eye movements are the rate-limiting step in reading. If a full sentence is presented, word by word, at the precise point where gaze is focalized, thus avoiding the need for eye movements, a good reader can read five hundred words per minute at staggering speed-a mean of eight hundred words per minute, and up to sixteen hundred words per minute for the best readers, is about one word every forty milliseconds and three to four times faster than normal reading! With this method, called rapid sequential visual presentation, or RSVP, identification and comprehension remain satisfactory, thus suggesting that the duration of those central steps does not impose a strong constraint on normal reading. Perhaps this computerized presentation mode represents the future of reading in a world where screens progressively replace paper.
At any rate, as long as text is presented in pages and lines, acquisition through gaze will slow reading and impose an unavoidable limitation. Thus, fast reading methods that advertise gains in reading speed of up to one thousand words per minute or more must be viewed with skepticism. One can no doubt broaden one's visual span somewhat, in order to reduce the number of saccades per line, and it is also possible to learn to avoid moments of regression, where gaze backtracks to the words it has just read. However, the physical limits of the eyes cannot be overcome, unless one is willing to skip words and thus run the risk of a misunderstanding. Woody Allen described this situation perfectly: "I took a speed-reading course and was able to read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It involves Russia."

Q. Which of the following statement is/are true according to the passage?
(i)  Retina is like a digital camera by which one can see the whole scene with a fixed accuracy.
(ii)  A retina is like a heterogeneous sensor in which resolution varies from one part to other.
(iii) Larger letters are not easy to read compared to smaller ones as they use larger portion of retina and thus visual precision suffers at the periphery.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 33

Statement (i)appears to be true but refer to the last sentence of the 2nd para "However, unlike the............ to land". It means that our eye is not like a digital camera as its visual accuracy is optimal at the center and smoothly decreases toward the periphery. Thus statement (i) is false. The second sentence of para a says that the Retina is not a homogeneous sensor which means that it is a heterogeneous sensor. For (iii) refer to this line of third paragraph ": small letters should be harder to read than larger ones. Oddly enough, however, this is not the case. The reason is that the larger the characters, the more room they use on the retina"
Both the statements (ii) and (iii) are true.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 34

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned
One of the most striking visuals in Montreux is that of the Freddie Mercury statue facing Lake Geneva. Cast in bronze, it shows him pumping a fist in the air. What’s unique about it is that it’s always decorated with a wreath or other fresh flowers placed there by fans. At the base of the statue is an inscription that says ‘Lover of Life, Singer of Songs’.
Since 2003, every year in September, enthusiastic fan groups organise Freddie Mercury’s Montreux Celebration Days. There are concerts, workshops, and talks, along with a gala night at the Montreux Casino. (1)Additionally, boat trips are organised to ‘Duck House’, the singer’s holiday home and retreat: a peaceful haven in Clarens that was popular with a lot of other musicians as well, who came to the Riviera to record their melodies. The five-room villa is (2)located inside the banks of Lake Geneva.
Along with its boathouse, it was made immortal on the cover of the band’s last album, Made In Heaven. The Swiss holiday home broker, Interhome, rents out the property to visitors today. It costs around 662 Euros per night for four people. (3)“The house  have  contributed  a lot to the history of music — ‘It’s a kind of magic!’ We are delighted to be able to offer this gem to our guests from all over the world,” says Roger Müller, Country Manager, Interhome Switzerland.
(4)The  historic Chateau de Chillon, the country’s most visited place is situated on a small island in Lake Geneva. Melodious heritage oozes from all corners of Montreux and one look at (5)Lake Geneva is obvious enough as to why so many musical geniuses came here for creative chow!

Q. Identify from the given options that best revises the underlined sentence (1) to improve the expression of the idea.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 34

All the given options do not improve the idea of the expression in any way. Thus option A.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 35

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned
One of the most striking visuals in Montreux is that of the Freddie Mercury statue facing Lake Geneva. Cast in bronze, it shows him pumping a fist in the air. What’s unique about it is that it’s always decorated with a wreath or other fresh flowers placed there by fans. At the base of the statue is an inscription that says ‘Lover of Life, Singer of Songs’.
Since 2003, every year in September, enthusiastic fan groups organise Freddie Mercury’s Montreux Celebration Days. There are concerts, workshops, and talks, along with a gala night at the Montreux Casino. (1)Additionally, boat trips are organised to ‘Duck House’, the singer’s holiday home and retreat: a peaceful haven in Clarens that was popular with a lot of other musicians as well, who came to the Riviera to record their melodies. The five-room villa is (2)located inside the banks of Lake Geneva.
Along with its boathouse, it was made immortal on the cover of the band’s last album, Made In Heaven. The Swiss holiday home broker, Interhome, rents out the property to visitors today. It costs around 662 Euros per night for four people. (3)“The house  have  contributed  a lot to the history of music — ‘It’s a kind of magic!’ We are delighted to be able to offer this gem to our guests from all over the world,” says Roger Müller, Country Manager, Interhome Switzerland.
(4)The  historic Chateau de Chillon, the country’s most visited place is situated on a small island in Lake Geneva. Melodious heritage oozes from all corners of Montreux and one look at (5)Lake Geneva is obvious enough as to why so many musical geniuses came here for creative chow!

Q. Identify the best possible change in the underlined sentence (2)

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 35

Correct preposition to be used with located is ‘on’, as the reference point is ''banks of the lake''.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 36

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned
One of the most striking visuals in Montreux is that of the Freddie Mercury statue facing Lake Geneva. Cast in bronze, it shows him pumping a fist in the air. What’s unique about it is that it’s always decorated with a wreath or other fresh flowers placed there by fans. At the base of the statue is an inscription that says ‘Lover of Life, Singer of Songs’.
Since 2003, every year in September, enthusiastic fan groups organise Freddie Mercury’s Montreux Celebration Days. There are concerts, workshops, and talks, along with a gala night at the Montreux Casino. (1)Additionally, boat trips are organised to ‘Duck House’, the singer’s holiday home and retreat: a peaceful haven in Clarens that was popular with a lot of other musicians as well, who came to the Riviera to record their melodies. The five-room villa is (2)located inside the banks of Lake Geneva.
Along with its boathouse, it was made immortal on the cover of the band’s last album, Made In Heaven. The Swiss holiday home broker, Interhome, rents out the property to visitors today. It costs around 662 Euros per night for four people. (3)“The house  have  contributed  a lot to the history of music — ‘It’s a kind of magic!’ We are delighted to be able to offer this gem to our guests from all over the world,” says Roger Müller, Country Manager, Interhome Switzerland.
(4)The  historic Chateau de Chillon, the country’s most visited place is situated on a small island in Lake Geneva. Melodious heritage oozes from all corners of Montreux and one look at (5)Lake Geneva is obvious enough as to why so many musical geniuses came here for creative chow!

Q. Identify the best possible change from the given options for the underlined sentence (3) to improve the expression of the idea.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 36

Cannot be option A as have is a plural form of tense and the passage talks about 1 house.

Option C can be eliminated as it means that the house has not at all contributed to the history of the music which is against the idea of the passage expressed in the previous paragraph.

Option B is eliminated because ''had'' is a past tense and ''has'' is a present tense. We know from the passage that the house still stands and continues to contribute to the music history.
Thus option D is correct.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 37

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned
One of the most striking visuals in Montreux is that of the Freddie Mercury statue facing Lake Geneva. Cast in bronze, it shows him pumping a fist in the air. What’s unique about it is that it’s always decorated with a wreath or other fresh flowers placed there by fans. At the base of the statue is an inscription that says ‘Lover of Life, Singer of Songs’.
Since 2003, every year in September, enthusiastic fan groups organise Freddie Mercury’s Montreux Celebration Days. There are concerts, workshops, and talks, along with a gala night at the Montreux Casino. (1)Additionally, boat trips are organised to ‘Duck House’, the singer’s holiday home and retreat: a peaceful haven in Clarens that was popular with a lot of other musicians as well, who came to the Riviera to record their melodies. The five-room villa is (2)located inside the banks of Lake Geneva.
Along with its boathouse, it was made immortal on the cover of the band’s last album, Made In Heaven. The Swiss holiday home broker, Interhome, rents out the property to visitors today. It costs around 662 Euros per night for four people. (3)“The house  have  contributed  a lot to the history of music — ‘It’s a kind of magic!’ We are delighted to be able to offer this gem to our guests from all over the world,” says Roger Müller, Country Manager, Interhome Switzerland.
(4)The  historic Chateau de Chillon, the country’s most visited place is situated on a small island in Lake Geneva. Melodious heritage oozes from all corners of Montreux and one look at (5)Lake Geneva is obvious enough as to why so many musical geniuses came here for creative chow!

Q. Pick the best option for sentence (4).

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 37

The passage talks about Montreux and its connection with music. Sentence 4 is a deviation from the idea of the passage.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 38

DIRECTIONS for the question : Read the passage and answer the question based on it. 

For some questions, consider how the passage might be revised to improve the expression of ideas. For other questions, consider how the passage might be edited to correct errors in sentence structure, usage or punctuation. After reading the passage, choose the answer to each question that most effectively improves the quality of writing in the passage or that makes the passage confirm to the conventions of standard written English. The underlined areas in the passage along with the [number] direct you to the question concerned
One of the most striking visuals in Montreux is that of the Freddie Mercury statue facing Lake Geneva. Cast in bronze, it shows him pumping a fist in the air. What’s unique about it is that it’s always decorated with a wreath or other fresh flowers placed there by fans. At the base of the statue is an inscription that says ‘Lover of Life, Singer of Songs’.
Since 2003, every year in September, enthusiastic fan groups organise Freddie Mercury’s Montreux Celebration Days. There are concerts, workshops, and talks, along with a gala night at the Montreux Casino. (1)Additionally, boat trips are organised to ‘Duck House’, the singer’s holiday home and retreat: a peaceful haven in Clarens that was popular with a lot of other musicians as well, who came to the Riviera to record their melodies. The five-room villa is (2)located inside the banks of Lake Geneva.
Along with its boathouse, it was made immortal on the cover of the band’s last album, Made In Heaven. The Swiss holiday home broker, Interhome, rents out the property to visitors today. It costs around 662 Euros per night for four people. (3)“The house  have  contributed  a lot to the history of music — ‘It’s a kind of magic!’ We are delighted to be able to offer this gem to our guests from all over the world,” says Roger Müller, Country Manager, Interhome Switzerland.
(4)The  historic Chateau de Chillon, the country’s most visited place is situated on a small island in Lake Geneva. Melodious heritage oozes from all corners of Montreux and one look at (5)Lake Geneva is obvious enough as to why so many musical geniuses came here for creative chow!

Q. Identify from the given options that best conveys the meaning of the underlined sentence (5)

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 38

Evident and Evidence are two different words. Evident means “obvious” while evidence means “proof/testimony”. “One look at Lake Geneva is evident enough” does not make sense whereas “one look at Lake Geneva is evidence enough” conveys the idea that the lake itself was an enough proof as to why the musicians flocked there.  

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 39

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.

From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.
We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.
Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.
In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.
One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.
Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.
Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province of Ngari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.
The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.
We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go to Lhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.
The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred Mount Kailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalaya range. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.
We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Which of the following is the correct statement?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 39

From the contents of the passage option A is correct.
The option B is incorrect as para 7 line 5 refers .."After  some hesitation ,he promised to communicate.....some months".
The climate was mainly fine and warm". So,option C is inappropiate. Also, the number of people accompanied is not seven.
So, optionD is also incorrect.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 40

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.
From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.
We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.
Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.
In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.
One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.
Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.
Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province of Ngari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.
The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.
We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go to Lhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.
The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred Mount Kailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalaya range. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.
We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Mark all the options from those given below the lists that correctly match items in the list

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 40

The correct combinations are

Hence the correct choice is B

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 41

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.
From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.
We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.
Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.
In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.
One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.
Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.
Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province of Ngari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.
The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.
We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go to Lhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.
The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred Mount Kailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalaya range. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.
We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Mark the correct statement

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 41

Option 1 is wrong because they were not served European style tea. Option 2 is wrong because the pass was issued till Ngari as mentioned in para 7th. Option 3 is right as the 4th para last line talks about it. Option 4 is incorrect as there is no mention of such a comparison.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 42

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the passage and answer the question that follows.
From our reading we knew that Gartok was the capital of Western Tibet, and the seat of the Viceroy; our geography books had told us that it was the highest town in the world. When, however, we finally set eyes on this famous place we could hardly help laughing. The first thing we saw were a few nomads' tents scattered about the immense plain, then we caught sight of a few mud-brick huts. That was Gartok. Except for a few stray dogs, there was no sign of life.
We pitched our little tent on the bank of the Gartang-Chu, a tributary of the Indus. At last a few curious individuals came up and we learned from them that neither of the two high officials was in the town and only the "Second Viceroy's" agent could receive us. We decided to submit our petition to this personage at once. Going into his office we had to bend low, for there was no door, only a hole in front of which hung a greasy curtain. We came into a dimly-lit room with paper gummed over the windows. When our eyes had grown accustomed to the twilight we discerned a man who looked intelligent and distinguished sitting like a Buddha on the floor before us. From his left ear dangled an ear-ring at least six inches long as a sign of his rank. There was also a woman present, who turned out to be the wife of the absent official. Behind us, pressed a crowd of children and servants who wished to see these peculiar foreigners from close at hand. We were very politely requested to sit down and were immediately offered dried meat, cheese, butter and tea. The atmosphere was cordial and warmed our hearts, and conversation flowed fairly freely with the aid of an English-Tibetan dictionary and supplementary gestures.
Next day, I brought the agent some medicines as a present. He was much pleased and asked me how to use them, whereupon I wrote out directions. At this point, we ventured to ask him if he would grant us a travel permit. He did not directly refuse, but made us await the coming of his chief who was on a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas, but was expected to return in a few days.
In the interval we made good friends with the agent. I gave him a burning-glass, an object of which one can make good use in Tibet. The customary return gift was not long in coming. One afternoon some bearers carried a present of butter, meat and flour to our tents. And not long after came the agent himself accompanied by a retinue of servants, to return our visit. When he saw how primitively we were lodged in our tents, he could not get over his astonishment that Europeans led such simple lives.
One morning, we heard the sound of bells in the distance as a huge mule-drawn caravan approached the village. Soldiers rode ahead followed by a swarm of male and female servants and after them members of the Tibetan nobility, also mounted, whom we now saw for the first time. The senior of the two Viceroys, whom they call Garpons in Tibet, was arriving. He and his wife wore splendid silk robes and carried pistols in their girdles. The whole village assembled to see the spectacle. Immediately after arriving, the Garpon moved in solemn procession into the monastery to give thanks to the gods for his safe return from the pilgrimage.
Aufschnaiter composed a short letter begging for our audience. As no answer came we set out in the late afternoon to visit the Garpon. His house was not essentially different from that of his agent, but inside it was cleaner and of better quality. The Garpon, a high official, is invested for the duration of his mission with the fourth rank in the hierarchy of the nobles. He is in charge of five districts which are administered by nobles of the fifth, sixth and seventh rank. At last we came into the presence of this potentate. We explained our case to him in all its details and he listened to us with friendly patience. Often he could not refrain from smiling at our defective Tibetan, while his retainers laughed out loud. This merriment added a spice to the conversation and created a friendly atmosphere. The Garpon promised to consider our case carefully and to talk it over with the representative of his colleague. At the end of the audience we were hospitably entertained and received tea made in the European fashion. Afterwards, the Garpon sent presents to our tents and we began to hope for a happy issue.
Our next audience was rather more formal but still cordial. It was a regular official meeting. The Garpon sat on a sort of throne and near him on a lower seat was the agent of his colleague. On a low table, lay a file of letters written on Tibetan paper. The Garpon informed us that he could only give us passes and transport for the province of Ngari. We would in no circumstances be allowed to enter the inner provinces of Tibet. We quickly took counsel together and suggested that he should give us a travel permit to the frontier of Nepal. After some hesitation he promised to communicate our request to the Government in Lhasa, but he explained to us that the answer might not arrive for some months. We were not anxious to wait all that time in Gartok. We had not given up the idea of pushing on to the east and were anxious to continue our journey at all costs. As Nepal was a neutral country situated in the direction which we wished to go, we felt that we could be satisfied with the result of the negotiations.
The Garpon then kindly asked us to remain for a few days longer as his guests, as pack-animals and a guide had to be found. After three days, our travel pass was delivered to us. It stipulated that our route should pass through the following places - Ngakhyu, Sersok, Montse, Barkha. Tokchen, Lholung, Shamtsang, Truksum and Gyabnak. It was also laid down that we had the right to requisition two yaks. A very important clause required the inhabitants to sell us provisions at the local prices, and to give us free fuel and servants for the evenings.
We were very glad to have obtained so much in the way of facilities. The Garpon invited us to a farewell dinner. Afterwards, he made us give him our word of honour not to go to Lhasa from his territory. At last, on July 13th, we bade farewell to Gartok and started on our way. Our little caravan, now of decent proportions, consisted of our two yaks with their driver and my small donkey, which was now in good shape and carried no more than a tea-kettle. Then came our guide, a young Tibetan named Norbu, on horseback, while we three Europeans modestly brought up the rear on foot.
The country through which we had been traveling for days had an original beauty. The wide plains were diversified by stretches of hilly country with low passes. We often had to wade through swift-running ice-cold burns. While in Gartok, we had had occasional showers of hail, but now the weather was mainly fine and warm. By this time we all had thick beards, which helped to protect us against the sun. It was long since we had seen a glacier, but as we were approaching the tasam at Barkha, a chain of glaciers gleaming in the sunshine came into view. The landscape was dominated by the 25,000-foot peak of Gurla Mandhata; less striking, but far more famous, was the sacred Mount Kailas, 3,000 feet lower, which stands in majestic isolation apart from the Himalaya range. When we first caught sight of it, the Tibetans prostrated themselves and prayed. At the places from which the first sight of the mountain can be obtained are set up heaps of stones, grown through the centuries to giant proportions, expressing the piety of the pilgrims, each of whom, following ancient observance, adds fresh stones to the heaps. We, too, would have liked to travel round the mountain as the pilgrims do, but the unfriendly master of the caravan serai at Barkha prevented us by threatening to stop our future transport facilities unless we continued on our way.
We mountaineers were more strongly attracted to the majestic Gurla Mandhata, mirrored in the waters of Lake Manasarovar, than by the Sacred Mountain. We pitched our tents on the shore of the lake and feasted our eyes on the indescribably beautiful picture of this tremendous mountain, which seemed to grow out of the lake. This is certainly one of the loveliest spots on earth. The lake is held to be sacred and round it one finds many small monasteries in which the pilgrims lodge and perform their devotions. Most of the people we met were traders. The biggest market in the region is that of Gyanyima. Here hundreds of tents form a huge camp given over to buying and selling.

Q. Mark the correct statement

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 42

Option A is incorrect as biggest market was at Gyanyima, According to the last para IInd  Last line.
According to para 4 line 2, Tibetian officials not only gifted butter, but also meat and flour.So,option B would be inappropiate.
Option D is incorrect as the Garpon was incharge of 5 districts which were adminstered by the nobles of 5th,6th and 7th rank as stated in 6th paragraph ,4th line. Last line of 8th paragraph states the contents of option C are absolutely correct.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 43

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the alternative that CANNOT go into the sentence in the blank space to make a coherent sentence:

The Indian parents have to marry off their daughters to a suitable boy at right age, whatever the cost and sacrifice. They fear their daughter's________ being violated if she grows to a certain age without being married.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 43

In this case, chastity (the state or practice of refraining from extramarital, or especially from all, sexual intercourse), honour and dignity fit the given blank.

Each of these refers to a similar sentiment. The word that does not fit the given blank is option 1.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 44

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the question and mark the appropriate answer.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 44

vis-à-vis is a preposition, et is a conjunction, elle is a pronoun so option 3 is the right answer

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 45

DIRECTIONS for the question: Create a word using all the given letters from the jumbled letters and identify its appropriate meaning.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 45

The word after rearranging becomes BEDAZZLED which means greatly impressed.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 46

DIRECTIONS for the question: Solve the question and mark the appropriate answer.

How many words of 4 and more letter words can be made using A E F R L N T, with E being compulsory in each word?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 46

Some of the words that can be made with these letters are:
1. Fern
2. Felt
3. Rent
4. Tear
5. Earn
6. Fare
7. Left
8. Fear
9. Fate
10. Rate
11. Near
12. Lean
13. Leaf
14. Teal
15. Learn
16. Learnt
We can see that these are greater than 12 already.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 47

DIRECTIONS for the question: Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalized pair.

Polio: Virus:: Anthrax : ?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 47

The relationship between Polio and virus is, Polio is caused due to virus. In the same way Anthrax makes pair with bacteria as bacteria is the cause of Anthrax.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 48

DIRECTIONS for the question: Identify the meaning of the given idiom/ phrase.

A hard nut to crack

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 48

The given idiom means ''anything which is very difficult to solve or handle. Hence answer is option 2.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 49

Scrutiny : Inspection : : Castigate : ?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 49

Scrutiny and Inspection are synonyms. Hence, we need to find the synonym of castigate. The meaning of 'castigate' is 'reprimand severely'. So, 'censure', which also means 'reprimand severely' is the correct answer.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 50

Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to

SYMPHONY : COMPOSER

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 50

A composer composes symphony. Similarly an author composes a novel. A music dies not compose song in d. A switch does not compose light and neither a flood composes a rain.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 51

Adults are by and large cautious learners. They are more _______ than youngsters on asking questions.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 51

The second sentence is an elaboration of a characteristic of adults i.e caution as depicted in the first sentence. Timid means lacking confidence which is the most apt of the options.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 52

Match each word in the left-hand column with the description in the right-hand column which best describes its meaning/synonym :

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 52

The correct set of pairs are:

The correct arrangement is Option D
(d)-(i); (a)-(ii); (e)-(iii); (b)-(iv); (c)-(v)

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 53

Identify the correct sentence from the given options:

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 53

Affect - to impact or change
Effect - is the result of a change
The words 'affect' and 'effect' have been used correctly in Option A.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 54

What does the idiom 'an arm and a leg' mean?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 54

'An arm and a leg' means something very expensive. For example, 'This is a beautiful ring, but it cost me an arm and a leg.'

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 55

The prince abdicated the crown and returned to his castle. Abdicated means…

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 55

To abdicate means to relinquish or give up a throne, power, right, or responsibility. It does not mean to sell (B), reinvest in (C), or auction (D).

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 56

Fill in the blanks with the appropriate words from the options given below:

We have only started on our _______ of our country--we have not as yet, with all our talk of wonderful progress, done more than _____ the surface.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 56

‘Scratch the surface’ is an often-used expression that means ‘deal with the matter only in the most superficial way’. Also, the word ‘development’ is quite suitable in the first blank. The sentence is conveying the idea that the progress of the country has just started and whatever has been done till now is quite minimal. Option a) is the correct answer.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 57

The following sentences when arranged in a logical order form a coherent paragraph. Find the correct order.
A. Time was when I prayed with fervour for such silence, and my wife with sighs for such care, but now they have come we are not so glad as we might have anticipated we should be
B. Indeed, I would rejoice secretly, though it may be unmanly weakness to admit it, even to hear Jane sing "Daisy," or, by the fracture of any plate but one of Euphemia's best green ones, to learn that the period of brooding has come to an end
C. She used in the old days to sing hymn tunes, or the British national song for the time being, to these instruments, but latterly she has been silent and even careful over her work
D. As I sit writing in my study, I can hear our Jane bumping her way downstairs with a brush and dust-pan

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 57

The point of the paragraph is that the author’s maid Jane has stopped singing, and contrary to his expectations, the author is unhappy with the silence and wishes that Jane starts singing again. As sentence D introduces us to the main subject of the paragraph it should be the opening sentence. The “She” referred to in C is Jane and hence C clearly follows D. A follows C where C mentions the newly established silence and A adds that this silence is not as sweet as the author had expected. B concludes the paragraph by saying that the author now wishes that Jane starts singing again. Hence, the order is DCAB.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 58

Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph.
A. I will not say that everything was utterly commonplace, because I doubt if anything can be that, except to utterly commonplace people—and there my vanity steps in.
B. Under none of the accredited ghostly circumstances, and environed by none of the conventional ghostly surroundings, did I first make acquaintance with the house which is the subject of this Christmas piece.
C. But, I will take it on myself to say that anybody might see the house as I saw it, any fine autumn morning.
D. I saw it in the daylight, with the sun upon it. There was no wind, no rain, no lightning, no thunder, no awful or unwonted circumstance, of any kind, to heighten its effect.
E. More than that: I had come to it direct from a railway station: it was not more than a mile distant from the railway station; and, as I stood outside the house, looking back upon the way I had come, I could see the goods train running smoothly along the embankment in the valley.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 58

B is the opening sentence of the paragraph where the author introduces the subject of the paragraph - the house. D-E are logically connected where D mentions the lack of any external circumstances to heighten the effect of the house on the viewer, and E adds that the house was even less threatening because the author could still see the trains. A contradicts D-E and hence must come after it. C concludes the passage by stating what the author will describe in the next paragraph.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 59

DIRECTIONS for the question: The sentence below has four underlined words or phrases, marked A, B, C and D. Identify the underlined part that must be changed to make the sentence correct.

Being / (A) a short holiday / (B) we had to return / (C) without visiting  many of the places / (D).

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 59

The error is of 'dangling modifier' as 'being a short holiday' is modifying the pronoun 'we', which is wrong. The word 'It' should come before 'being' in part (a) of the sentence i.e a subject is required after 'being' and if no specific subject is mentioned than the impersonal pronoun 'it' can be used. Hence the error is in part 1.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 60

DIRECTIONS for the question: Pick the best option which completes the sentence in the most meaningful manner.

The concert this weekend promises to attract _____________ than attended the last one.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 60

The sense conveyed by the sentence is about the number of people who are going to attend the concert.
'Number' is used over 'amount' as it is used for countable nouns.
We use greater with number and larger with amount.That is why we rule out option 1 and 2.
'A group of people' is also wrong,it can not be used in this context.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 61

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Mr. Mansingh has five sons - Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Sourav, and three daughters - Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born first followed by two daughters. Sourav is the eldest child and Janaki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games, The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janaki, plays hockey.

Q. Arun is the ______________ child of Mr. Mansingh.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 61

Sons - Arun (A), Mahi (M), Rohit (R), Nitesh (N), Sourav (S)
Daughters - Tamanna (T), Kuntala (K), Janaki (J)
From the given information, we can arrange the sons & daughters in descending order of their age.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 62

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Mr. Mansingh has five sons - Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Sourav, and three daughters - Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born first followed by two daughters. Sourav is the eldest child and Janaki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games, The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janaki, plays hockey.

Q. Sourav is a student of which school?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 62

Sons - Arun (A), Mahi (M), Rohit (R), Nitesh (N), Sourav (S)
Daughters - Tamanna (T), Kuntala (K), Janaki (J)
From the given information, we can arrange the sons & daughters in descending order of their age.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 63

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Mr. Mansingh has five sons - Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Sourav, and three daughters - Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born first followed by two daughters. Sourav is the eldest child and Janaki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games, The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janaki, plays hockey.

Q. What game does Tamanna play?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 63

Sons - Arun (A), Mahi (M), Rohit (R), Nitesh (N), Sourav (S)
Daughters - Tamanna (T), Kuntala (K), Janaki (J)
From the given information, we can arrange the sons & daughters in descending order of their age.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 64

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Mr. Mansingh has five sons - Arun, Mahi, Rohit, Nilesh and Sourav, and three daughters - Tamanna, Kuntala and Janaki. Three sons of Mr. Mansingh were born first followed by two daughters. Sourav is the eldest child and Janaki is the youngest. Three of the children are studying at Trinity School and three are studying at St Stefan. Tamanna and Rohit study at St Stefan school. Kuntala, the eldest daughter, plays chess. Mansorover school offers cricket only, while Trinity school offers chess. Beside, these schools offer no other games, The children who are at Mansorover school have been born in succession. Mahi and Nilesh are cricketers while Arun plays football. Rohit who was born just before Janaki, plays hockey.

Q. Which of the following pairs was not born in succession (ignore the order)?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 64

Sons - Arun (A), Mahi (M), Rohit (R), Nitesh (N), Sourav (S)
Daughters - Tamanna (T), Kuntala (K), Janaki (J)
From the given information, we can arrange the sons & daughters in descending order of their age.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 65

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given belov/ and examine the graph to solve the questions.

The above given graph shows the Twister Manufacturing Ltd sales, opening and closing inventory figures for the last 6 years.
Note: Sales = Opening Inventory + Production - Closing Inventory.

Q. What is the percentage growth in average annual sales of the last 3 years versus average sales of first 4 years? Select the closest from the given choices.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 65

Average of 99-02 is 950. Of 02-04 is 1150. Growth is 200 / 950 = 21%

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 66

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given belov/ and examine the graph to solve the questions.

The above given graph shows the Twister Manufacturing Ltd sales, opening and closing inventory figures for the last 6 years.
Note: Sales = Opening Inventory + Production - Closing Inventory.

Q. What is difference between the average closing inventory and the average opening inventory over the given period?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 66

Total of Opening is 4800. That of closing is 5150. So difference is 350.
Average difference is 350 / 6 = 58.33

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 67

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given belov/ and examine the graph to solve the questions.

The above given graph shows the Twister Manufacturing Ltd sales, opening and closing inventory figures for the last 6 years.
Note: Sales = Opening Inventory + Production - Closing Inventory.

Q. If production figures are plotted on the graph, then the shape of the production line

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 67

Production = Sales + Closing Inventory - Opening Inventory
The production figures from 99 to 04 are- 900, 1100, 900, 1150, 1350, 1250. 
In shape this resembles the closing inventory graph.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 68

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given belov/ and examine the graph to solve the questions.

The above given graph shows the Twister Manufacturing Ltd sales, opening and closing inventory figures for the last 6 years.
Note: Sales = Opening Inventory + Production - Closing Inventory.

Q. What is the percentage decrease in the opening inventory in the year 2002 as compared to the previous year?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 68

800 becomes 700. The decrease is 100 and the percentage decrease is 100 × 100/800 = 12.5%.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 69

DIRECTIONS for the question: The data given below pertains to seven different industry sectors with respect to income, expenditure, profits. Study the data and answer the question.

Q. Depreciation as a percentage of total expenses is maximum in which industry sector?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 69

It is more than 10% for Electricity sector. For the rest it is less than 10%.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 70

DIRECTIONS for the question: The data given below pertains to seven different industry sectors with respect to income, expenditure, profits. Study the data and answer the question.

Q. Which industry sector has 'salaries and wages' as 3rd largest item in its expenses?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 70

It can be verified that Food & Machinery sectors have 'salaries and wages' as 3rd largest item in their expenses.
 

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 71

DIRECTIONS for the question: The data given below pertains to seven different industry sectors with respect to income, expenditure, profits. Study the data and answer the question.

Q. If the industry sectors are ranked on the basis of 'Tax paid as a proportion of sales' in the ascending order, then which industry will be placed at rank 3?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 71


Higher tax paid in proportion to sales means higher rank.
Accordingly, Services will be at Rank 1 (value 0.041), Electricity at Rank 2 (0.036) & Machinery at Rank 3 (0.025).
Thus Machinery sector is placed at 3rd rank.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 72

DIRECTIONS for the question: The data given below pertains to seven different industry sectors with respect to income, expenditure, profits. Study the data and answer the question.

Q. If power and fuel charges are increased by 200% and the rankings are based on Profit Before Tax in the descending order, then which of the following statements is wrong?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 72

Diversified sector retains its 3rd rank and thus statement 3 is incorrect.
 

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 73

DIRECTIONS for the question: The data given below pertains to seven different industry sectors with respect to income, expenditure, profits. Study the data and answer the question.

Q. Other expenses of Chemical  is

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 73

Total income = 498476 + 7303 = 505779, Profit  before tax = 7467 + 19861 = 27338, So other expenses = 505779 - 27388 - 393141 = Rs.85300

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 74

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
There are five villages A, B, C, D and E. Two of these have post offices, three have schools and three are accessible by road. Two have population of more than 5000 each, two have population between 2000 and 5000 each, and one has a population of less than 2000. Two of these villages have electricity in addition to certain other facilities such as school and accessibility by road. One village with a population of less than 2000 has a school but neither has a post office nor is accessible by road while each of the villages with a population of more than 5000 has a school. Of the two villages having population between 2000 and 5000 only one has a post office and is accessible by road. A is accessible by road. B has a population of more than 5000, D has a school and is accessible by road but does not have a post office, while E has a school but is not accessible by road. C does not have a post office

Q. Which village has a school and also a post office?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 74




It can be verified that village B has a school and also a post office.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 75

DIRECTIONS for the question: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.
There are five villages A, B, C, D and E. Two of these have post offices, three have schools and three are accessible by road. Two have population of more than 5000 each, two have population between 2000 and 5000 each, and one has a population of less than 2000. Two of these villages have electricity in addition to certain other facilities such as school and accessibility by road. One village with a population of less than 2000 has a school but neither has a post office nor is accessible by road while each of the villages with a population of more than 5000 has a school. Of the two villages having population between 2000 and 5000 only one has a post office and is accessible by road. A is accessible by road. B has a population of more than 5000, D has a school and is accessible by road but does not have a post office, while E has a school but is not accessible by road. C does not have a post office

Q. Which village does not have any of the facilities available to other villages?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 75



From the above information, we can check that village C has none of the facilities available to other villages.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 76

DIRECTIONS for the question: Study the information given below and answer the question that follows.
Sitting at a square table are a smuggler, a mafia boss, a bootlegger and a contract killer. Only two of these men, Mama and Kalia, are genuine criminals. The other two are CID officers posing as criminals. Mama is sitting opposite the Mafia boss; the junior CID officer is sitting to the left of the smuggler and the senior CID officer is sitting opposite the bootlegger. The junior officer disguised as

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 76

 

It can be verified from the above diagrams that the junior officer can be disguised as Mafia boss or Bottlelegger.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 77

A multinational company organizes a tv-series poll of 1000 people of 3 teams which are HR, Sales, and Technical. People were given the option to select at most 2 from limitless and money heist. There were 300 people who didn't like any of it. The people who liked both the shows from HR, Sales, and Tech are in ratio 1 : 2 : 0 respectively. The number of people who liked only one show was 550. Also, in team HR the people who liked limitless, money heist and both are in ratio 1 : 4 : 2 respectively. People in tech who like limitless are 75 while people in tech who like money heist are equal to people in Sales who like exactly 1 tv-series. Also, people in sales who like only limitless and only money heist are in ratio 5 : 2 respectively.

Q. How many people from Sales liked money heist only?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 77

As we are given that 300 people doesn't like any show then total people in Venn = 700.
exactly 1 = 550
both shows = 700 - 550 =150
so, 2p + 4p = 150

p = 25

Now , in second condition people from the tech who like exactly limitless = 75
now we know,
25 + 100 + x + y + x + y + 75 = 550
2x + 2y = 350
x + y =175
and as x : y :: 5 : 2
so x = 125; y = 50.
Finally, we get,

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 78

A multinational company organizes a tv-series poll of 1000 people of 3 teams which are HR, Sales, and Technical. People were given the option to select at most 2 from limitless and money heist. There were 300 people who didn't like any of it. The people who liked both the shows from HR, Sales, and Tech are in ratio 1 : 2 : 0 respectively. The number of people who liked only one show was 550. Also, in team HR the people who liked limitless, money heist and both are in ratio 1 : 4 : 2 respectively. People in tech who like limitless are 75 while people in tech who like money heist are equal to people in Sales who like exactly 1 tv-series. Also, people in sales who like only limitless and only money heist are in ratio 5 : 2 respectively.

Q. How many people from technical team likes exactly 1 tv show?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 78

As we are given that 300 people doesn't like any show then total people in Venn = 700.
exactly 1 = 550
both shows = 700 - 550 =150
so, 2p + 4p = 150
p = 25

Now , in second condition people from the tech who like exactly limitless = 75
now we know,
25 + 100 + x + y + x + y + 75 = 550
2x + 2y = 350
x + y =175
and as x : y :: 5 : 2
so x = 125; y = 50.
Finally, we get,

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 79

A multinational company organizes a tv-series poll of 1000 people of 3 teams which are HR, Sales, and Technical. People were given the option to select at most 2 from limitless and money heist. There were 300 people who didn't like any of it. The people who liked both the shows from HR, Sales, and Tech are in ratio 1 : 2 : 0 respectively. The number of people who liked only one show was 550. Also, in team HR the people who liked limitless, money heist and both are in ratio 1 : 4 : 2 respectively. People in tech who like limitless are 75 while people in tech who like money heist are equal to people in Sales who like exactly 1 tv-series. Also, people in sales who like only limitless and only money heist are in ratio 5 : 2 respectively.

Q. How many people like only limitless?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 79

As we are given that 300 people doesn't like any show then total people in Venn = 700.
exactly 1 = 550
both shows = 700 - 550 =150
so, 2p + 4p = 150
p = 25

Now , in second condition people from the tech who like exactly limitless = 75
now we know,
25 + 100 + x + y + x + y + 75 = 550
2x + 2y = 350
x + y =175
and as x : y :: 5 : 2
so x = 125; y = 50.
Finally, we get,

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 80

A multinational company organizes a tv-series poll of 1000 people of 3 teams which are HR, Sales, and Technical. People were given the option to select at most 2 from limitless and money heist. There were 300 people who didn't like any of it. The people who liked both the shows from HR, Sales, and Tech are in ratio 1 : 2 : 0 respectively. The number of people who liked only one show was 550. Also, in team HR the people who liked limitless, money heist and both are in ratio 1 : 4 : 2 respectively. People in tech who like limitless are 75 while people in tech who like money heist are equal to people in Sales who like exactly 1 tv-series. Also, people in sales who like only limitless and only money heist are in ratio 5 : 2 respectively.

Q. What is ratio of people who like only money heist and no tv shows at all?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 80

As we are given that 300 people doesn't like any show then total people in Venn = 700.
exactly 1 = 550
both shows = 700 - 550 =150
so, 2p + 4p = 150
p = 25

Now , in second condition people from the tech who like exactly limitless = 75
now we know,
25 + 100 + x + y + x + y + 75 = 550
2x + 2y = 350
x + y =175
and as x : y :: 5 : 2
so x = 125; y = 50.
Finally, we get,

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 81

5 students joined online mock series of Cracku. The above line graph shows the marks scored by 5 students A, B, C, D, and E in 5 mocks ie. mock1, mock2, mock3, mock4, and mock5. 
The horizontal axis represents students and vertical axis represents marks scored by students.

Q. What is difference of medians of 2 students who scored highest and 3rd highest combined in all mocks respectively?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 81

The students with the highest and 3rd highest combined marks are D and A respectively. Their median marks are 60,60. Hence the difference in medians = 0

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 82

5 students joined online mock series of Cracku. The above line graph shows the marks scored by 5 students A, B, C, D, and E in 5 mocks ie. mock1, mock2, mock3, mock4, and mock5. 
The horizontal axis represents students and vertical axis represents marks scored by students.

Q. Who has scored the maximum marks in all mocks combined?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 82

We can see that D scored maximum marks with a total of 320.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 83

5 students joined online mock series of Cracku. The above line graph shows the marks scored by 5 students A, B, C, D, and E in 5 mocks ie. mock1, mock2, mock3, mock4, and mock5. 
The horizontal axis represents students and vertical axis represents marks scored by students.

Q. What is the difference between averages of mocks where students scored maximum and minimum marks all combined together?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 83

The students scored the highest combined marks in Mock 1 and the least combined marks in Mock 4. Hence the difference in Average = (370 - 210) / 5 = 32

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 84

5 students joined online mock series of Cracku. The above line graph shows the marks scored by 5 students A, B, C, D, and E in 5 mocks ie. mock1, mock2, mock3, mock4, and mock5. 
The horizontal axis represents students and vertical axis represents marks scored by students.

Q. What is the difference between mode and median score of student D?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 84

The Marks scored by student D are 50, 60, 60, 60, 90. Hence both media and mode are equal to 60. Difference in median and mode = 0.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 85

In an MNC, a combined meeting of four departments HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing was held with 2 representatives from each department. The names of all representatives were Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish. The meeting was held on a round table with all seats filled. Few of the points about the seating arrangement are mentioned below:
1. No 2 people from the same department sit together.
2. No 2 people from the same department sit opposite to each other.
3. Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.
4. Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing.
5. The person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.
8. Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs.
9. Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
10. Aftab and Catherine were from same department.
Answer the following questions on the basis of the above information.

Q. Who were the representatives from finance?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 85

HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing are represented by H, F, T and S&M respectively while Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish are represented by A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H respectively.
From statement 3 Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.

from 4, Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing. So representative on the right of Aftab is Dullu because he has his right side free from S&M.
Also from 5, the person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
and we also know from 6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.

From 8, Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs who are H and G.
From 9, Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
From 10 we know Aftab and Catherine were from same department. and there are only 2 seats left for finance guys. So they'll occupy those seats.

We know exactly 6 people with their departments.
And A and C are from finance.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 86

In an MNC, a combined meeting of four departments HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing was held with 2 representatives from each department. The names of all representatives were Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish. The meeting was held on a round table with all seats filled. Few of the points about the seating arrangement are mentioned below:
1. No 2 people from the same department sit together.
2. No 2 people from the same department sit opposite to each other.
3. Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.
4. Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing.
5. The person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.
8. Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs.
9. Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
10. Aftab and Catherine were from same department.
Answer the following questions on the basis of the above information.

Q. What is the maximum number of people who could be uniquely identified with their department?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 86

HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing are represented by H, F, T and S&M respectively while Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish are represented by A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H respectively.
From statement 3 Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.

from 4, Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing. So representative on the right of Aftab is Dullu because he has his right side free from S&M.
Also from 5, the person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
and we also know from 6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.

From 8, Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs who are H and G.
From 9, Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
From 10 we know Aftab and Catherine were from same department. and there are only 2 seats left for finance guys. So they'll occupy those seats.


We know exactly 6 people with their department.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 87

In an MNC, a combined meeting of four departments HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing was held with 2 representatives from each department. The names of all representatives were Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish. The meeting was held on a round table with all seats filled. Few of the points about the seating arrangement are mentioned below:
1. No 2 people from the same department sit together.
2. No 2 people from the same department sit opposite to each other.
3. Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.
4. Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing.
5. The person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.
8. Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs.
9. Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
10. Aftab and Catherine were from same department.
Answer the following questions on the basis of the above information.

Q. Who is sitting opposite to Ema?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 87

HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing are represented by H, F, T and S&M respectively while Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish are represented by A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H respectively.
From statement 3 Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.

from 4, Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing. So representative on the right of Aftab is Dullu because he has his right side free from S&M.
Also from 5, the person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
and we also know from 6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.

From 8, Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs who are H and G.
From 9, Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
From 10 we know Aftab and Catherine were from same department. and there are only 2 seats left for finance guys. So they'll occupy those seats.


 

We know exact 6 people with their departments.
E and F were not uniquely known so d) is the answer.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 88

In an MNC, a combined meeting of four departments HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing was held with 2 representatives from each department. The names of all representatives were Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish. The meeting was held on a round table with all seats filled. Few of the points about the seating arrangement are mentioned below:
1. No 2 people from the same department sit together.
2. No 2 people from the same department sit opposite to each other.
3. Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.
4. Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing.
5. The person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.
8. Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs.
9. Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
10. Aftab and Catherine were from same department.
Answer the following questions on the basis of the above information.

Q. Name and department of the person sitting opposite to Dullu?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 88

HR, Finance, Technical and Sales & Marketing are represented by H, F, T and S&M respectively while Aftab, Bishan, Catherine, Dullu, Ema, Frank, Gouri, and Harish are represented by A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H respectively.
From statement 3 Aftab was surrounded by sales & marketing representatives from both sides.

from 4, Gouri was an HR and was sitting on the immediate right of Dullu who was from sales & marketing. So representative on the right of Aftab is Dullu because he has his right side free from S&M.
Also from 5, the person sitting opposite to Gouri did not belong to Finance.
and we also know from 6. Harish is an HR who is sitting opposite to Aftab.

From 8, Bishan, a techie was sitting between two HRs who are H and G.
From 9, Ema and Aftab did not belong to same department.
From 10 we know Aftab and Catherine were from same department. and there are only 2 seats left for finance guys. So they'll occupy those seats.


 

We know exact 6 people with their departments.
And D and C are sitting opposite to each other.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 89

4 persons A, B, C, D went to a casino in order to play poker. They are having Rs 225, 450, 500 and 650 in the beginning in no particular order. They all lose some amount of their money and are left with 150, 200, 300, 375 in no particular order. A is having the least amount in the beginning while the difference between the amount carried by D and that by C in the beginning is Rs 150. At least one person spends Rs 75 in the poker. The amount spent by only one of the persons is equal to the amount carried by another person in the beginning.

Q. How many different combinations of the given 4 persons with their money in the beginning and at the end are possible.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 89

Since the amount lost by 1 person is equal to the amount carried in the beginning by the other person, pair of 650,150 or 650,200 is possible.It is also given that at least one person loses Rs 75.
3 cases are possible as shown:



In each of the 3 cases shown above, the positions of C and D can be interchanged ( We do not know whether C or D is greater). Hence, a total of 6 cases are possible. Option C is the right answer.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 90

4 persons A, B, C, D went to a casino in order to play poker. They are having Rs 225, 450, 500 and 650 in the beginning in no particular order. They all lose some amount of their money and are left with 150, 200, 300, 375 in no particular order. A is having the least amount in the beginning while the difference between the amount carried by D and that by C in the beginning is Rs 150. At least one person spends Rs 75 in the poker. The amount spent by only one of the persons is equal to the amount carried by another person in the beginning.

Q. If only 1 person lost Rs 75, find the sum of all different possible values of the total amount lost by the person who has 500 in the beginning.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 90

Since the amount lost by 1 person is equal to the amount carried in the beginning by the other person, pair of 650,150 or 650,200 is possible.It is also given that at least one person loses Rs 75.
3 cases are possible as shown:


Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 91

Atal Innovation Mission with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Wadhwani Foundation has launched a Incubator Capabilities enhancement program for a Robust Ecosystem focused on creating high performing Startups. What is the name of the program launched ?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 91

NITI Aayog's Atal Innovation Mission (AIM), in partnership with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Wadhwani Foundation has launched AIM iCREST. This is a first of its kind initiative for advancing innovation at scale in India. It is a major initiative to encourage and enable progress in the incubator ecosystem across the country.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 92

Japanese energy major JERA and Indian Power company ____________ have signed a pact with a group of banks for financing their new gas-fired thermal power generation project in Bangladesh?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 92

Both Japanese energy major JERA and Reliance Power will develop a new 745 MW natural gas combined-cycle power project in Meghnaghat in Bangladesh.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 93

Housing minister Hardeep Puri launched an app to market residential properties. What is the name of the app?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 93

CREDAI Awaas is an app launched by Housing Minister Hardeep Puri for market residential properties.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 94

Which Aerospace company has successfully test fired an upper stage rocket engine ‘Raman’?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 94

Skyroot Aerospace has successfully test fired an upper stage rocket engine Raman.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 95

With which country India signed an agreement to establish ‘Emergency Medical services’?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 95

India and Maldives signed an agreement to establish emergency medical services in male.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 96

Who has authored the books 'If it Bleeds’ and ‘The Outsiders’?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 96

The author of the books ‘If it Bleeds’ and ‘The Outsiders’ is Stephen King.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 97

Which country will host the ICC Men’s T20 World cup 2022?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 97

The ICC Men’s T20 World Cup 2020 that has been postponed due to Covid-19 will be held in Australia in 2022, and the ICC Men’s T20 World cup 2021 will be hosted by India.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 98

Match the following seaports with the states in which they are present.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 98

The correct match for this question will be 1-c, 2-a, 3-b, 4-d.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 99

Which ministry is responsible for the construction of roads in border areas of India?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 99

The Ministry of Defence is responsible for the construction of roads in border areas of India and the organization which deals with it is Border Road Organisation (BRO).

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 100

Who handed over the charge of Indian National Army to Netaji?

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 100

In the year 1943, Rash Behari Bose handed over the charge of Indian National Army to Subash Chandra Bose also known as Netaji.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 101

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Which of the following High Courts has decriminalized begging while stating that criminalizing begging violates fundamental rights of some of the most vulnerable people in our society?

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 102

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Where is the headquarters of Intel located?

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 103

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Union Defence Minister Rajnath Singh has laid the foundation for a missile-seeker facility centre (SFC) and a warhead production unit at Bharat Dynamics Limited (BDL) in which city?

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 104

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Name the CM of Maharashtra who launched ‘Maha Jobs Portal’ online platform to provide employment opportunities.

Detailed Solution for Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 104

Maharashtra chief minister Uddhav Thackeray launched the ‘Maha Jobs Portal’an online platform to provide employment opportunities to local residents of the state by connecting job seekers with employers. The people who register at the portal should submit a domicile certificate, which is mandatory. The portal is run by the Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation(MIDC). The portal is a joint venture between the Department of Industries, Department of Labour, and Skill Development-Entrepreneurship of the Government of Maharashtra.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 105

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Prime Minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the RashtriyaSwachhata Kendra (RSK) an interactive experience centre on the Swachh Bharat Mission in which city?

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 106

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change deals with

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 107

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

“Selfscan” is the app developed by Information Technology department of which state?

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 108

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Name the new book launched by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to inspire students around the globe to adopt environmentally friendly habits and greener lifestyles.

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 109

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

Under which section of IBC, 2016, the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India amended the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India (Insolvency Resolution Process for Corporate Persons) Regulations, 2016?

Practice Test for IIFT - 4 - Question 110

DIRECTIONS for the question: Mark the best option:

The “United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Charity”, which commemorates the anniversary of the passing away of Mother Teresa of Calcutta, is observed annually across the globe on:

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