CLAT  >  Mock Tests Series for Law Entrance Exams  >  SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) Download as PDF

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern)


Test Description

60 Questions MCQ Test Mock Tests Series for Law Entrance Exams | SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern)

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) for CLAT 2023 is part of Mock Tests Series for Law Entrance Exams preparation. The SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) questions and answers have been prepared according to the CLAT exam syllabus.The SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) MCQs are made for CLAT 2023 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) below.
Solutions of SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) questions in English are available as part of our Mock Tests Series for Law Entrance Exams for CLAT & SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) solutions in Hindi for Mock Tests Series for Law Entrance Exams course. Download more important topics, notes, lectures and mock test series for CLAT Exam by signing up for free. Attempt SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) | 60 questions in 60 minutes | Mock test for CLAT preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study Mock Tests Series for Law Entrance Exams for CLAT Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
1 Crore+ students have signed up on EduRev. Have you?
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 1

Directions: Choose the correct alternative to continue the given series.

3, 5, 9, 17, 33, ___

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 1 The pattern followed in the series is + 2, + 4, + 8, + 16, + 32, etc.

So, the missing number is

33 + 32 = 65

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 2

Directions: In the following question, four groups of letters are given. One of these groups is different from the others in some way. Find the one that is different from the others.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 2 S + 1 = T

T + 5 = Y

Y + 1 = Z

Similarly,

W + 1 = X

X + 5 = C

C + 1 = D

And

I + 1 = J

J + 5 = O

O + 1 = P

But this pattern is not followed in 'BCLM'.

B + 1 = C

C + 9 = L

L + 1 = M

So, BCLM is different from others.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 3

A clock is set right at 1:00 p.m. If it gains one minute per hour, then what is the correct time when it shows 6:00 p.m. on the same day?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 3 For every 60 minutes of true time, the clock shows 61 minutes.

So, for a time of 5 hours on this clock, the true time is:

Thus, answer option (b) is correct.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 4

Directions: In the following question, the two words given to the left of sign (: :) bear a certain relationship to each other. The same relationship exists between the two words to its right, one of which is missing. Find the missing word from the given alternatives.

Spring : Spiral : : Bangle : ?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 4 A spring is spiral-shaped, while a bangle is circular in shape.

Hence, option 2 is correct.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 5

In a certain code language. 'FIGHTER' is written as 'HTERFIG'. How will the word 'QUESTIONS' be written?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 5 TIONSQUES - Letter exactly in the centre moves to the first position and then last four letters are added and then first four letters are added.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 6

Pointing to a lady, Rohit said, ''She is the sister of the daughter of my father's wife's son.'' How is the lady related to Rohit?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 6 Rohit's father's wife's son - Either Rohit or his brother

Now, the lady is the sister of the daughter of either Rohit or his brother.

So, the lady is his either daughter or niece.

Hence, answer option d is correct.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 7

Directions: Find the odd one out.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 7 In all other pairs, except option (1), second number is obtained by arranging the digits of the first number in descending order.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 8

Directions: Find the odd one from the given alternatives.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 8 Except Ganga, all the other rivers are peninsular rivers. Ganga is a Himalayan river.

So, Ganga is the odd one.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 9

Ninu was born on 3rd March, 1980. Mini was born 3 days before Ninu. If the Republic Day that year fell on a Saturday, then Mini was born on a

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 9 Mini was born on 29th February, 1980 (a leap year). It is given that 26th January, 1980 was a Saturday. From 26th January to 29th February, there are 34 days. This leaves a remainder of 6 when divided by 7. Thus, Saturday + 6 further days gives Friday.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 10

Directions: There is a certain relationship between the two terms to the left of the sign (: :). The same relationship exists between the two terms to the right of it, out of which one is missing. Find the missing term from the given alternatives.

3 : 35 : : 99 : _____

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 10 The sequence contains the products of pairs of successive odd numbers, i.e. (1 × 3), (5 × 7), (9 × 11) etc.

The missing number is (13 × 15) = 195.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 11

Neelam, says to Deepika, ''Your mother Rekha is the only sister of my father Deepak, whose father is Ram Lal.'' How is Ram Lal related to Neelam?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 11

Ram Lal is Neelam's grandfather.

Hence, option (c) is the right answer.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 12

If water is called black, black is called tree, tree is called blue, blue is called rain, rain is called pink and pink is called fish in a certain language, then what is the colour of sky called in that language?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 12 The question in a way asks "What is blue called in that language?"

Blue is called rain.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 13

Directions: The following question consists of two statements, one labelled as Assertion (A) and the other as Reason (R). You are to examine these two statements carefully and select the correct option accordingly.

Assertion (A): Directive Principles of State Policy are adopted from Irish Constitution.

Reason (R): Ireland itself borrowed them from Spain.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 13 India has borrowed the concept of Directive Principles from the Irish Constitution and Ireland has in turn borrowed them from Spain. Therefore, both (A) and (R) are true, but (R) is not the correct explanation of (A).
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 14

Directions: The sentence given below is a legal principle followed by a factual situation based on the legal principle. Choose the correct option, which relates both the principle and the situation.

Legal Principle: Contractual liability is completely irrelevant to the existence of liability in tort.

Factual Situation: Sudhir purchased a bottle of soft drink from a retailer. As he consumed more than half of the content of the bottle, he found decomposed remains of a cockroach in the bottle. He vomited and fell sick on the thought of what he has consumed. He sued the manufacturer of soft drink for negligence, though there is no contractual duty on the part of manufacturer. In your opinion, is the suit maintainable against the manufacturer or the retailer?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 14 The manufacturer owes a duty of care, which was breached, because it was reasonably foreseeable that failure to ensure the product's safety would lead to harm of consumers. Hence, Sudhir can sue the manufacturer as he had a duty to ensure that bottles did not contain any such material.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 15

Directions: The question consists of two statements, one labelled as Principle(s) and the other as Facts. You are to examine the Principle(s) and apply it/them to the given Facts carefully, and select the best option.

Principle: Oral evidence must, in all cases, be direct, i.e. if the evidence is a fact that was seen, it must be given by the person who saw it or felt it.

Facts: A woman sitting in her apartment heard a gunshot in the next room.

Who is/are required to give the necessary evidence?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 15 If a woman sitting in her apartment heard a gunshot in the next room, she must give oral evidence in court that she heard it, because oral evidence must be given directly by the person who saw it so that nothing crucial should be missed. Moreover, the expressions can be shown by the person who saw it in reality.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 16

Directions: The question consists of two statements, one labelled as Principle(s) and the other as Facts. You are to examine the Principle(s) and apply it/them to the given Facts carefully, and select the best option.

Principle: An employer is liable for the negligence of his employee done during his course of employment.

Facts: Batman was a billionaire businessman in the city of Gotham and the owner of Wayne Enterprises. Alfred and Robin were two of his employees. One day, Batman asked Robin and Alfred to carry some piece of technology with all the care to Amanda Waller, the chief of ARGUS. They were told that any negligence could be fatal and they should go to the destination directly. While going there, Robin encountered Riddler, a criminal, and started chasing him with the van which was carrying the piece of technology. Alfred asked him not to do so, but he did not listen. He hit the van in a house, and the device in the van exploded, causing massive damage to the house.

Decide.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 16 Robin was going with Batman's business, but he engaged in chasing Riddler on his own, which was outside the course of his employment. So, the correct answer is option two.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 17

Directions: Read the following situation and choose the correct answer to the question asked.

Situation: Arya and Anya were widows of a Muslim man, Aashiq. They both entered into a contract that whosoever marries another man will have to forget her share in Aashiq's property.

Which of the following statements is true?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 17 This is a valid contract because there is no restraint on marriage. Here, both the widows are free to marry.

A similar view was taken in Suryanarayana Murthi v. P. Krishna Murthy wherein co-widows had entered into an agreement to forfeit their share on deceased husband's property if they remarried and this was held a valid contract as the agreement did not directly restrain marriage.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 18

Directions: The question consists of two statements, one labelled as Principle and the other as Facts. You are to examine the principle and apply it to the given facts carefully and select the best option.

Principle: When an offer is accepted by a person to whom it is made, it becomes a promise. But this promise will become legally binding only when the acceptance of the offer is unconditional.

Facts: Ram makes an offer to sell his house to Shyam for Rs. 50 lacs. Shyam accepts this offer, but he wants to pay the price of the house in five quarterly installments. Ram does not agree to it. Thereafter, Shyam agrees to pay the price of the house in the way as originally desired by Ram. But Ram does not reply to it. Can Shyam compel Ram to sell his house to him?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 18 According to the principle, the acceptance must be unconditional. But in this case, Shyam's acceptance was accompanied with a condition which is actually a counter offer. Therefore, Shyam cannot compel Ram to sell the house. It is upto Ram whether he wants to sell it now or not.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 19

Directions: The question consists of two statements, one labelled as Principle(s) and the other as Facts. You are to examine the Principle(s) and apply it/them to the given Facts carefully, and select the best option.

Principle: Direct evidence is that which goes expressly to the very point in question and which, if believed, proves the point in question without aid from inference or reasoning.

Facts: A was tried for the murder of B. Evidence of the fact that A had a motive to murder B and that, at the time B was murdered, A withdrew a sword and was seen going towards the place where B was murdered and, shortly afterwards, was seen returning from the place with clothes stained with blood.

What would be the nature of evidence highlighted through clothes stained with blood?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 19 The motive to murder and going to the place of B is the direct evidence, while his clothes stained with blood would be indirect or circumstantial evidence; as direct evidence is that which goes expressly to the very point in question and which, if believed, proves the point in question without aid from inference or reasoning, while indirect evidence is inverse of it.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 20

Directions: The following question consists of two statements, one labelled as Assertion (A) and the other as Reason (R). You are to examine these two statements carefully and select the correct option accordingly.

Assertion (A): It is the responsibility of the prosecution to prove a person guilty beyond any reasonable doubt.

Reason (R): Every man is to be regarded as legally innocent, until the contrary is proved.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 20 Both (A) and (R) are true. However, (R) fails to explain the reason as to why prosecution has to prove a person guilty beyond reasonable doubt.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 21

Directions: The question consists of two statements, one labelled as Principle and the other as Facts. You are to examine the principle and apply it to the given statements carefully and select the best option.

Principle: Negligence is a breach of duty or a failure of one party to exercise the standard of care required by law, resulting in damage to the party to whom the duty was owed. A plaintiff can take civil action against the respondent, if the respondent's negligence causes the plaintiff injury or loss of property.

Facts: Ram and his friends went to a restaurant and ordered and paid for iced tea. The cover and design for the cup carrying iced tea was opaque and therefore, the contents could not be seen from outside. Ram consumed some of the contents and then lifted the cup to pour the remainder of the contents into a tumbler. The remains of a cockroach in decomposed state dropped out of the cup into the tumbler. Ram later complained of a stomach pain and his doctor diagnosed him as having gastroenteritis and being in a state of severe shock. Ram sued the owner of restaurant for negligence.

Decide the case.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 21 It is the duty of restaurant owner to take reasonable care for its customer. Therefore, restaurant owner is liable for negligence. They have to see whether the contents are fit for human consumption or not.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 22

Directions: Read the following situation and choose the correct answer to the question asked.

Situation: Aryan transferred his entire property, including his house, in the name of Lord Krishna as he was a die-hard devotee of Lord Krishna. The transfer proceedings were carried out in the name of a temple trust under the instructions of the religious head and leader of the trust, whom Aryan blindly followed and worshipped like God.

Is the transfer valid?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 22 Transfer is carried out under the instructions of the religious head and leader of the trust, whom Aryan blindly followed and worshipped like God. This indicates that there is undue influence. Hence, his consent is not free.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 23

Directions: The sentence given below is a legal principle followed by a factual situation based on the legal principle. Choose the correct option, which relates both the principle and the situation.

Principle: The standard to determine whether a person has been guilty of negligence is the standard of care which, in the given circumstances, a reasonable man could have foreseen.

Facts: The Agricultural University constructed 200 houses for its employees in its premises. Two huge bore wells were sunk and motors were installed. They did not cover the pump rooms properly. A child, 6 years old, from one of the quarters was playing near the pump house. On hearing the noise of the pump, she was curious to see the motor. She touched the motor that was not covered properly and three of her fingers were cut.

Decision:

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 23 In spite of the child's act, her parents can successfully sue the university for damages because the university has been negligent.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 24

Directions: The question consists of two statements, one labelled as Principle and the other as Facts. You are to examine the principle and apply it to the given facts carefully and select the best option.

Principle: When a party to a contract has refused to perform, or disabled himself from performing his promise in its entirety, the other party may put an end to the contract.

Facts: A engaged B on April 12 to enter his service on June 1, but on May 11, A wrote to B that his services would not be needed. On May 22, B joined C for employment.

Decide.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 24 B is not bound to wait till June 1 because A already asked B that his services would not be needed anymore. This means that B can freely join anywhere else and is not bound to wait till June 1.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 25

Directions: Find the missing term in the following series.

6, 3, 12, 6, 18, ___

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 25 In the given series, there are 2 sub-series running alternately. The first sub-series contains successive multiples of 6 and the second sub-series contains successive multiples of 3. So, the missing term is the next multiple of 3, which is 9.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 26

Directions: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Seven friends H, I, J, K, L, M and N are seated in a straight line, but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south.

K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line.

Only three people are sitting between K and M. J is sitting second to the right of M.

H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

Who among the following is sitting at an extreme end of the line, facing north?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 26 From the given information, we get

(1) K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line. Only three people are sitting between K and M.

Case-I

Case-II

Case-III

Case-IV

(2) J is sitting second to the right of M. H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Hence, only Case-III is possible.

(3) Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

The correct order of persons and their directions is as follows:

Hence, no one is sitting at any extreme end of the line, facing north.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 27

Directions: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Seven friends H, I, J, K, L, M and N are seated in a straight line, but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south.

K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line.

Only three people are sitting between K and M. J is sitting second to the right of M.

H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N (i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

In which of the following pairs are both the persons facing south?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 27 From the given information, we get

(1) K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line. Only three people are sitting between K and M.

Case-I

Case-II

Case-III

Case-IV

(2) J is sitting second to the right of M. H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Hence, only Case-III is possible.

(3) Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

The correct order of persons and their directions is as follows:

Hence, the persons in pair (K, J) are facing south.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 28

Directions: In the following question, a letter series is given with one or more terms missing. Choose the alternative that will continue the same pattern and complete the given series.

CJQ, DKR, ELS, FMT, ...

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 28 The given series follows the following pattern

The first letter of each term is obtained by adding 1 to the first letter of the previous term.

The second letter is obtained by adding 1 to the second letter of the previous term.

The third letter is obtained by adding 1 to the third letter of the previous term.

This will be shown as:

Therefore, GNU is the correct answer.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 29

Directions: In the following question, a statement is followed by two assumptions I and II. You are to consider each statement and assumptions that follow, and decide which of the assumption(s) is/are implicit in the statement.

Statement:

A few people demanded one-man-one-post for strengthening the political party and for efficient administration.

Assumptions:

I. No human being can be efficient in two spheres.

II. A person attending to only administration or party work will be able to do much.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 29 One-man-one-post can be for the better functioning but it does not mean that a person can not do better in two fields. So, only assumption II is implicit as focusing on only one thing, a man can do more.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 30

If FRANCE is coded as 123456 and GERMANY is coded as 7628349, then FARMER will be coded as

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 30 According to question, FRANCE is coded as 123456 and GERMANY is coded as 7628349.

So, codes for F = 1

R = 2

A = 3

N = 4

C = 5

E = 6

G = 7

M = 8

Y = 9

According to the above observations, FARMER will be coded as 132862.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 31

Directions: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Seven friends H, I, J, K, L, M and N are seated in a straight line, but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south.

K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line.

Only three people are sitting between K and M. J is sitting second to the right of M.

H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

What is the position of N with respect to K?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 31 From the given information, we get

(1) K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line. Only three people are sitting between K and M.

Case-I

Case-II

Case-III

Case-IV

(2) J is sitting second to the right of M. H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Hence, only Case-III is possible.

(3) Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

The correct order of persons and their directions is as follows:

The position of N with respect to K is second to the right.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 32

Directions: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Seven friends H, I, J, K, L, M and N are seated in a straight line, but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south.

K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line.

Only three people are sitting between K and M. J is sitting second to the right of M.

H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

Based on the given information, which of the following statements is true with respect to L?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 32 From the given information, we get

(1) K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line. Only three people are sitting between K and M.

Case-I

Case-II

Case-III

Case-IV

(2) J is sitting second to the right of M. H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Hence, only Case-III is possible.

(3) Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

The correct order of persons and their directions is as follows:

Hence, 'only one person is sitting between L and H' is the true statement.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 33

Directions: Read the information given below and answer the question that follows.

Seven friends H, I, J, K, L, M and N are seated in a straight line, but not necessarily in the same order. Some of them are facing north while some are facing south.

K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line.

Only three people are sitting between K and M. J is sitting second to the right of M.

H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

Who among the following are siting exactly between K and I?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 33 From the given information, we get

1) K is sitting third to the left of I. Neither I nor K is sitting at any of the extreme ends of the line. Only three people are sitting between K and M.

Case-I

Case-II

Case-III

Case-IV

(2) J is sitting second to the right of M. H is sitting to the immediate left of N. N, who is facing south, is not an immediate neighbour of K.

Hence, only Case-III is possible.

(3) Both the immediate neighbours of L are facing south.

Both the immediate neighbours of K are facing the direction opposite to that of N ﴾i.e. if N faces north, then both the immediate neighbours of K are facing south and vice versa).

The correct order of persons and their directions is as follows:

Hence, L and J are sitting exactly between K and I.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 34

Rohit travels a distance of 15 km towards South, then turns to his left and travels 25 km. He again turns left and travels 15 km. How far is he from his starting point?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 34

AB = CD = 15 km

AD = BC = 25 km

He is 25 km far from his starting point.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 35

The present ages of Nitish, Manish and Rohit are in the ratio 5 : 6 : 11. Seven years later, the sum of their ages will be 87. Find their present ages.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 35 Let the present ages of Nitish, Manish and Rohit be 5x, 6x and 11x, respectively.

According to the question,

(5x + 7) + (6x + 7) + (11x + 7) = 87

22x + 21 = 87

22x = 66

x = 3

Nitish's age = 5 x 3 = 15 yr

Manish's age = 6 x 3 = 18 yr

Rohit's age = 11 x 3 = 33 yr

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 36

A and B run a 2 km race. A gives B a start of 100 m and still beats him by 20 seconds. If A runs at 20 kmph, find B's rate in kmph.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 36 A covers the distance of 2 km in (2/20) hours, i.e. 360 seconds.

B covers the distance of (2000 - 100), i.e. 1900 m in 360 + 20, i.e. 380 seconds.

B's speed = (1900/380) = 5 m/s = 5 × 18/5 = 18 kmph

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 37

Directions: Read the passage and answer the following question.

In 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonize Australia. Never had a colony been founded so far from its parent state, or in such ignorance of the land it occupied. There had been no reconnaissance. In 1770 Captain James Cook had made landfall on the unexplored east coast of this utterly enigmatic continent, stopped for a short while at a place named 'Botany Bay' and gone north again. Since then, no ship had called - not a word, not an observation, for 17 years, each one of which was exactly like the thousands that had preceded it, locked in its historical immensity of blue heat, blush, sandstone and the measured booming of glassy pacific rollers.

Now this coast was to witness a new colonial experiment, never tried before, not repeated since, an unexplored continent would become a jail. The space around it, the very air and sea, the whole transparent labyrinth of the South pacific, would become a wall 14,000 miles thick.

The late 18th century abounded in schemes of social goodness thrown off by its burgeoning sense of revolution. But here, the process was to be reversed: not Utopia, but Dystopia; not Rousseau's natural man moving in moral grace amid free social contracts, but man coerced, exiled, deracinated, in chains. Other parts of the Pacific, especially Tahiti, might seem to confirm Rousseau. But the intellectual patrons of Australia, in its first colonial years, were Hobbes and Sade.

In their most sanguine moments, the authorities hoped that it would eventually swallow a whole class - the "criminal class", whose existence was one of the prime sociological beliefs of late Georgian and early Victorian England. Australia was settled to defend English property not from the frog-eating invader across the Channel but from the marauder within. English lawmakers wished not only to get rid of the "Criminal class" but if possible to forget about it. Australia was a cloaca, invisible, its contents filthy and unnamable.

To most Englishmen this place seemed not just a mutant society but another planet - an exiled world, summed up in its popular name, "Botany Bay". It was remote and anomalous to its white creators. It was strange but close, as the unconscious to the conscious mind. There was as yet no such thing as "Australian" history or culture. For its first forty years, everything that happened in the thief-colony was English. In the whole period of convict transportation, the Crown shipped more than 160,000 men, women and children (due to defects in the records, the true number will never be precisely known) in bondage to Australia. This was the largest forced exile of citizens at the behest of a European government in pre-modern history. Nothing in earlier penology compares with it. In Australia, England drew the sketch for our own century's vaster and more terrible fresco of repression the Gulag. No other country had such a birth, and its pangs may be said to have begun on the afternoon of January 26, 1788, when a fleet of eleven vessels carrying 1,030 people, including 548 male and 188 female convicts, under the command of captain Arthur Phillip in his flagship Sirius, entered Port Jackson or, as it would presently be called, Sydney Harbor.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 37 For seventeen years no observation was made on the island. It can be inferred from, 'Since then, no ship had called - not a word, not an observation, for 17 years, each one of which was exactly like the thousands that had preceded it, locked in its historical immensity of blue heat, blush, sandstone and the measured booming of glassy pacific rollers.'
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 38

Directions: Read the passage and answer the following question.

In 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonize Australia. Never had a colony been founded so far from its parent state, or in such ignorance of the land it occupied. There had been no reconnaissance. In 1770 Captain James Cook had made landfall on the unexplored east coast of this utterly enigmatic continent, stopped for a short while at a place named 'Botany Bay' and gone north again. Since then, no ship had called - not a word, not an observation, for 17 years, each one of which was exactly like the thousands that had preceded it, locked in its historical immensity of blue heat, blush, sandstone and the measured booming of glassy pacific rollers.

Now this coast was to witness a new colonial experiment, never tried before, not repeated since, an unexplored continent would become a jail. The space around it, the very air and sea, the whole transparent labyrinth of the South pacific, would become a wall 14,000 miles thick.

The late 18th century abounded in schemes of social goodness thrown off by its burgeoning sense of revolution. But here, the process was to be reversed: not Utopia, but Dystopia; not Rousseau's natural man moving in moral grace amid free social contracts, but man coerced, exiled, deracinated, in chains. Other parts of the Pacific, especially Tahiti, might seem to confirm Rousseau. But the intellectual patrons of Australia, in its first colonial years, were Hobbes and Sade.

In their most sanguine moments, the authorities hoped that it would eventually swallow a whole class - the "criminal class", whose existence was one of the prime sociological beliefs of late Georgian and early Victorian England. Australia was settled to defend English property not from the frog-eating invader across the Channel but from the marauder within. English lawmakers wished not only to get rid of the "Criminal class" but if possible to forget about it. Australia was a cloaca, invisible, its contents filthy and unnamable.

To most Englishmen this place seemed not just a mutant society but another planet - an exiled world, summed up in its popular name, "Botany Bay". It was remote and anomalous to its white creators. It was strange but close, as the unconscious to the conscious mind. There was as yet no such thing as "Australian" history or culture. For its first forty years, everything that happened in the thief-colony was English. In the whole period of convict transportation, the Crown shipped more than 160,000 men, women and children (due to defects in the records, the true number will never be precisely known) in bondage to Australia. This was the largest forced exile of citizens at the behest of a European government in pre-modern history. Nothing in earlier penology compares with it. In Australia, England drew the sketch for our own century's vaster and more terrible fresco of repression the Gulag. No other country had such a birth, and its pangs may be said to have begun on the afternoon of January 26, 1788, when a fleet of eleven vessels carrying 1,030 people, including 548 male and 188 female convicts, under the command of captain Arthur Phillip in his flagship Sirius, entered Port Jackson or, as it would presently be called, Sydney Harbor.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 38 The existence of the criminal class was one of the prime sociological beliefs of late Georgian and early Victorian England. It can be inferred from, 'In their most sanguine moments, the authorities hoped that it would eventually swallow a whole class - the "criminal class", whose existence was one of the prime sociological beliefs of late Georgian and early Victorian England.'
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 39

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Early in the careers of most novelists, the critics nag and carp; later, the cold eye of reassessment is cast over their life's work at the peak of a writing career, which is where Doris Lessing now stands, the years of solid achievement command maximum respect. ­

A survey of critical responses to Lessing's books might reveal curious strata of social history. It is hard to remember now that she was once considered very daring and very militant (she insisted that relations between the sexes were difficult and unequal). She has been accused of being a feminist, and then accused by feminists of not being feminist enough. She has been a communist, but then moved on from a belief in simplistic political solutions to interest in deeper psychological change, touching on themes of madness and of mystical and extrasensory states of consciousness.

Lessing has written clearly into all her work the conviction that we are moving blindly and inevitably toward global catastrophe. Her message seems to be our complete moral and social bankruptcy, particularly in the relations between men and women. Hers is not an angry feminism, though her men are rather poor creatures compared to her bruised but gritty women. Anger may imply a hope that things could be better if only some sense could be knocked into somebody's head, a hope for a time after the revolution. One does not feel that Lessing sees any hope, only perpetual deadlock.

Certainly Lessing has earned the respect accorded to a writer of her stature and productivity. Doggedly she has been writing into her fiction signposts and warnings that we need desperately to be reminded of and writing in a way that has been more persuasive and imaginative than if she had been a pure polemicist. But the critic has the problem of distinguishing between what an author says and the way she says it. The moralist in Lessing, struggling with the very skilled writer, at times has made her writing prolix, clogged, slow - though in her latest novels she has successfully introduced a leavening of fantasy. The fact is that there are writers who in an economical page or two can make us feel our dilemmas more piercingly than she does in a leisurely fictional experience. Missing from her work is that sense of time and space gathered up for a moment between the hands, that sudden shift from understanding to seeing directly, that we expect at rare moments from our storytellers.

Q. The aspect of Lessing's work most extensively discussed in the passage is its

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 39 The passage makes repeated references to the moralist in Lessing, which even interferes with the quality of her work. There is also a reference to her assertions regarding our moral and social bankruptcy. Option 4 is the answer.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 40

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Early in the careers of most novelists, the critics nag and carp; later, the cold eye of reassessment is cast over their life's work at the peak of a writing career, which is where Doris Lessing now stands, the years of solid achievement command maximum respect. ­

A survey of critical responses to Lessing's books might reveal curious strata of social history. It is hard to remember now that she was once considered very daring and very militant (she insisted that relations between the sexes were difficult and unequal). She has been accused of being a feminist, and then accused by feminists of not being feminist enough. She has been a communist, but then moved on from a belief in simplistic political solutions to interest in deeper psychological change, touching on themes of madness and of mystical and extrasensory states of consciousness.

Lessing has written clearly into all her work the conviction that we are moving blindly and inevitably toward global catastrophe. Her message seems to be our complete moral and social bankruptcy, particularly in the relations between men and women. Hers is not an angry feminism, though her men are rather poor creatures compared to her bruised but gritty women. Anger may imply a hope that things could be better if only some sense could be knocked into somebody's head, a hope for a time after the revolution. One does not feel that Lessing sees any hope, only perpetual deadlock.

Certainly Lessing has earned the respect accorded to a writer of her stature and productivity. Doggedly she has been writing into her fiction signposts and warnings that we need desperately to be reminded of and writing in a way that has been more persuasive and imaginative than if she had been a pure polemicist. But the critic has the problem of distinguishing between what an author says and the way she says it. The moralist in Lessing, struggling with the very skilled writer, at times has made her writing prolix, clogged, slow - though in her latest novels she has successfully introduced a leavening of fantasy. The fact is that there are writers who in an economical page or two can make us feel our dilemmas more piercingly than she does in a leisurely fictional experience. Missing from her work is that sense of time and space gathered up for a moment between the hands, that sudden shift from understanding to seeing directly, that we expect at rare moments from our storytellers.

Q. The passage suggests that the author admires writers

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 40 Dogma and political thought are not the concern of the passage, nor are styles. 'The fact is that there are writers who in an economical page or two can make us feel our dilemmas more piercingly than she does in a leisurely fictional experience. Missing from her work is that sense of time and space gathered up for a moment between the hands, that sudden shift from understanding to seeing directly, that we expect at rare moments from our storytellers.' Sense of time and space relates to insights. Option 3 is correct.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 41

Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the following question.

While several discoveries in science, ever since people started engaging in organised research activity, have led to a better life for the average human being, it cannot be gainsaid that some have been used to cause untold misery to vast sections. The developments in science and technology have proved to be a mixed blessing - marvellous medical discoveries like penicillin and antibiotics have cured diseases whereas the fabrication of the atom bomb has resulted in wiping out entire towns and populations. It all goes to show that science is a double-edged weapon because it can be used both for good and evil purposes. Herein comes a crucial question of ethics. Is it not possible for a scientist to say no when asked to take up research that may one day lead to destruction? This poser has been troubling the participants in research activity for decades. Noelle Lenoir, who has served as a chairperson on the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO and is now heading the European Commission's Group of Advisers on the Ethical Implication of Biotechnology, has done well to highlight several related issues in the World Science Report.

While bitter disputes followed the dropping of the atom bombs over the two Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, there was no organised reaction as such. But the developments in biology like genetic engineering, which is nothing but a process of modifying living organisms, led to an ethics movement even three decades ago. Significantly enough, a conference of geneticists meeting at Azilomar in the U.S. declared a moratorium on research for one year, providing a pause for understanding the possible risks to human health and the environment as a result of using genetically-modified organisms. During the 1960s, ethics panels were set up in several countries but France was the first country to establish a national consultative committee for ethics in the life and health sciences. A survey made three years ago by the UNESCO Bioethics Unit pointed to the functioning of more than 200 national ethics committees all over the world. It is interesting to learn that there is now a discernible movement from ethics to law with the aim of protecting human rights faced with the challenge of science and technology. Again, it is worth noting that the Ubter Parliamentary Union placed the issue of the links between bioethics and human rights on its agenda. Essentially, the objective of these efforts is to affirm that the human being is not a mere object for science.

Q. Why did scientists declare a moratorium on research for one year?

I. It was done to study the risks to human health.

II. It was done to study the risks to environment.

III. It was done to debate about ethical issues.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 41 The following line from the passage can be referred to in answer to the question, '...a conference of geneticists meeting at Azilomar in the U.S. declared a moratorium on research for one year, providing a pause for understanding the possible risks to human health and the environment as a result of using genetically-modified organisms.'
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 42

Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the following question.

While several discoveries in science, ever since people started engaging in organised research activity, have led to a better life for the average human being, it cannot be gainsaid that some have been used to cause untold misery to vast sections. The developments in science and technology have proved to be a mixed blessing - marvellous medical discoveries like penicillin and antibiotics have cured diseases whereas the fabrication of the atom bomb has resulted in wiping out entire towns and populations. It all goes to show that science is a double-edged weapon because it can be used both for good and evil purposes. Herein comes a crucial question of ethics. Is it not possible for a scientist to say no when asked to take up research that may one day lead to destruction? This poser has been troubling the participants in research activity for decades. Noelle Lenoir, who has served as a chairperson on the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO and is now heading the European Commission's Group of Advisers on the Ethical Implication of Biotechnology, has done well to highlight several related issues in the World Science Report.

While bitter disputes followed the dropping of the atom bombs over the two Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, there was no organised reaction as such. But the developments in biology like genetic engineering, which is nothing but a process of modifying living organisms, led to an ethics movement even three decades ago. Significantly enough, a conference of geneticists meeting at Azilomar in the U.S. declared a moratorium on research for one year, providing a pause for understanding the possible risks to human health and the environment as a result of using genetically-modified organisms. During the 1960s, ethics panels were set up in several countries but France was the first country to establish a national consultative committee for ethics in the life and health sciences. A survey made three years ago by the UNESCO Bioethics Unit pointed to the functioning of more than 200 national ethics committees all over the world. It is interesting to learn that there is now a discernible movement from ethics to law with the aim of protecting human rights faced with the challenge of science and technology. Again, it is worth noting that the Ubter Parliamentary Union placed the issue of the links between bioethics and human rights on its agenda. Essentially, the objective of these efforts is to affirm that the human being is not a mere object for science.

Q. The tone of the article is

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 42 The tone of the article is at best descriptive. It describes the various events that are taking place.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 43

Directions: Read the passage and answer the following question.

In 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonize Australia. Never had a colony been founded so far from its parent state, or in such ignorance of the land it occupied. There had been no reconnaissance. In 1770 Captain James Cook had made landfall on the unexplored east coast of this utterly enigmatic continent, stopped for a short while at a place named 'Botany Bay' and gone north again. Since then, no ship had called - not a word, not an observation, for 17 years, each one of which was exactly like the thousands that had preceded it, locked in its historical immensity of blue heat, blush, sandstone and the measured booming of glassy pacific rollers.

Now this coast was to witness a new colonial experiment, never tried before, not repeated since, an unexplored continent would become a jail. The space around it, the very air and sea, the whole transparent labyrinth of the South pacific, would become a wall 14,000 miles thick.

The late 18th century abounded in schemes of social goodness thrown off by its burgeoning sense of revolution. But here, the process was to be reversed: not Utopia, but Dystopia; not Rousseau's natural man moving in moral grace amid free social contracts, but man coerced, exiled, deracinated, in chains. Other parts of the Pacific, especially Tahiti, might seem to confirm Rousseau. But the intellectual patrons of Australia, in its first colonial years, were Hobbes and Sade.

In their most sanguine moments, the authorities hoped that it would eventually swallow a whole class - the "criminal class", whose existence was one of the prime sociological beliefs of late Georgian and early Victorian England. Australia was settled to defend English property not from the frog-eating invader across the Channel but from the marauder within. English lawmakers wished not only to get rid of the "Criminal class" but if possible to forget about it. Australia was a cloaca, invisible, its contents filthy and unnamable.

To most Englishmen this place seemed not just a mutant society but another planet - an exiled world, summed up in its popular name, "Botany Bay". It was remote and anomalous to its white creators. It was strange but close, as the unconscious to the conscious mind. There was as yet no such thing as "Australian" history or culture. For its first forty years, everything that happened in the thief-colony was English. In the whole period of convict transportation, the Crown shipped more than 160,000 men, women and children (due to defects in the records, the true number will never be precisely known) in bondage to Australia. This was the largest forced exile of citizens at the behest of a European government in pre-modern history. Nothing in earlier penology compares with it. In Australia, England drew the sketch for our own century's vaster and more terrible fresco of repression the Gulag. No other country had such a birth, and its pangs may be said to have begun on the afternoon of January 26, 1788, when a fleet of eleven vessels carrying 1,030 people, including 548 male and 188 female convicts, under the command of captain Arthur Phillip in his flagship Sirius, entered Port Jackson or, as it would presently be called, Sydney Harbor.

Q. Elsewhere, according to the author, the late eighteenth century saw a plethora of:

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 43 Answer can be inferred from, 'The late 18th century abounded in schemes of social goodness thrown off by its burgeoning sense of revolution.' 'Schemes of social goodness' makes the answer implicit.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 44

Directions: Read the passage and answer the following question.

In 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonize Australia. Never had a colony been founded so far from its parent state, or in such ignorance of the land it occupied. There had been no reconnaissance. In 1770 Captain James Cook had made landfall on the unexplored east coast of this utterly enigmatic continent, stopped for a short while at a place named 'Botany Bay' and gone north again. Since then, no ship had called - not a word, not an observation, for 17 years, each one of which was exactly like the thousands that had preceded it, locked in its historical immensity of blue heat, blush, sandstone and the measured booming of glassy pacific rollers.

Now this coast was to witness a new colonial experiment, never tried before, not repeated since, an unexplored continent would become a jail. The space around it, the very air and sea, the whole transparent labyrinth of the South pacific, would become a wall 14,000 miles thick.

The late 18th century abounded in schemes of social goodness thrown off by its burgeoning sense of revolution. But here, the process was to be reversed: not Utopia, but Dystopia; not Rousseau's natural man moving in moral grace amid free social contracts, but man coerced, exiled, deracinated, in chains. Other parts of the Pacific, especially Tahiti, might seem to confirm Rousseau. But the intellectual patrons of Australia, in its first colonial years, were Hobbes and Sade.

In their most sanguine moments, the authorities hoped that it would eventually swallow a whole class - the "criminal class", whose existence was one of the prime sociological beliefs of late Georgian and early Victorian England. Australia was settled to defend English property not from the frog-eating invader across the Channel but from the marauder within. English lawmakers wished not only to get rid of the "Criminal class" but if possible to forget about it. Australia was a cloaca, invisible, its contents filthy and unnamable.

To most Englishmen this place seemed not just a mutant society but another planet - an exiled world, summed up in its popular name, "Botany Bay". It was remote and anomalous to its white creators. It was strange but close, as the unconscious to the conscious mind. There was as yet no such thing as "Australian" history or culture. For its first forty years, everything that happened in the thief-colony was English. In the whole period of convict transportation, the Crown shipped more than 160,000 men, women and children (due to defects in the records, the true number will never be precisely known) in bondage to Australia. This was the largest forced exile of citizens at the behest of a European government in pre-modern history. Nothing in earlier penology compares with it. In Australia, England drew the sketch for our own century's vaster and more terrible fresco of repression the Gulag. No other country had such a birth, and its pangs may be said to have begun on the afternoon of January 26, 1788, when a fleet of eleven vessels carrying 1,030 people, including 548 male and 188 female convicts, under the command of captain Arthur Phillip in his flagship Sirius, entered Port Jackson or, as it would presently be called, Sydney Harbor.

Q. When the author refers to the marauder within, he is referring to

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 44 'The marauder within' refers to the criminal class. In the sentence 'In their most sanguine moments, ... across the Channel but from the marauder within,' 'within' is used for the criminal class that lived in England and had to be dealt with. Hence, option 3 is the correct answer.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 45

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Early in the careers of most novelists, the critics nag and carp; later, the cold eye of reassessment is cast over their life's work at the peak of a writing career, which is where Doris Lessing now stands, the years of solid achievement command maximum respect. ­

A survey of critical responses to Lessing's books might reveal curious strata of social history. It is hard to remember now that she was once considered very daring and very militant (she insisted that relations between the sexes were difficult and unequal). She has been accused of being a feminist, and then accused by feminists of not being feminist enough. She has been a communist, but then moved on from a belief in simplistic political solutions to interest in deeper psychological change, touching on themes of madness and of mystical and extrasensory states of consciousness.

Lessing has written clearly into all her work the conviction that we are moving blindly and inevitably toward global catastrophe. Her message seems to be our complete moral and social bankruptcy, particularly in the relations between men and women. Hers is not an angry feminism, though her men are rather poor creatures compared to her bruised but gritty women. Anger may imply a hope that things could be better if only some sense could be knocked into somebody's head, a hope for a time after the revolution. One does not feel that Lessing sees any hope, only perpetual deadlock.

Certainly Lessing has earned the respect accorded to a writer of her stature and productivity. Doggedly she has been writing into her fiction signposts and warnings that we need desperately to be reminded of and writing in a way that has been more persuasive and imaginative than if she had been a pure polemicist. But the critic has the problem of distinguishing between what an author says and the way she says it. The moralist in Lessing, struggling with the very skilled writer, at times has made her writing prolix, clogged, slow - though in her latest novels she has successfully introduced a leavening of fantasy. The fact is that there are writers who in an economical page or two can make us feel our dilemmas more piercingly than she does in a leisurely fictional experience. Missing from her work is that sense of time and space gathered up for a moment between the hands, that sudden shift from understanding to seeing directly, that we expect at rare moments from our storytellers.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following can be attributed to Lessing's concern with warning society of its deterioration?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 45 Options a, b and c can be easily rejected, being irrelevant. Although she tends to moralise, her social and political activism is rather too far-fetched. The reference to prolix and clogged writing directly points to option (d).
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 46

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Early in the careers of most novelists, the critics nag and carp; later, the cold eye of reassessment is cast over their life's work at the peak of a writing career, which is where Doris Lessing now stands, the years of solid achievement command maximum respect. ­

A survey of critical responses to Lessing's books might reveal curious strata of social history. It is hard to remember now that she was once considered very daring and very militant (she insisted that relations between the sexes were difficult and unequal). She has been accused of being a feminist, and then accused by feminists of not being feminist enough. She has been a communist, but then moved on from a belief in simplistic political solutions to interest in deeper psychological change, touching on themes of madness and of mystical and extrasensory states of consciousness.

Lessing has written clearly into all her work the conviction that we are moving blindly and inevitably toward global catastrophe. Her message seems to be our complete moral and social bankruptcy, particularly in the relations between men and women. Hers is not an angry feminism, though her men are rather poor creatures compared to her bruised but gritty women. Anger may imply a hope that things could be better if only some sense could be knocked into somebody's head, a hope for a time after the revolution. One does not feel that Lessing sees any hope, only perpetual deadlock.

Certainly Lessing has earned the respect accorded to a writer of her stature and productivity. Doggedly she has been writing into her fiction signposts and warnings that we need desperately to be reminded of and writing in a way that has been more persuasive and imaginative than if she had been a pure polemicist. But the critic has the problem of distinguishing between what an author says and the way she says it. The moralist in Lessing, struggling with the very skilled writer, at times has made her writing prolix, clogged, slow - though in her latest novels she has successfully introduced a leavening of fantasy. The fact is that there are writers who in an economical page or two can make us feel our dilemmas more piercingly than she does in a leisurely fictional experience. Missing from her work is that sense of time and space gathered up for a moment between the hands, that sudden shift from understanding to seeing directly, that we expect at rare moments from our storytellers.

Q. The passage implies that the author views communism as an ideology that

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 46 "She has been a communist, but then moved on from a belief in simplistic political solutions to ...."

This means that the author views communism as a simplistic solution, unable to gauge today's complexities.

Option 1 is correct.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 47

Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the following question.

While several discoveries in science, ever since people started engaging in organised research activity, have led to a better life for the average human being, it cannot be gainsaid that some have been used to cause untold misery to vast sections. The developments in science and technology have proved to be a mixed blessing - marvellous medical discoveries like penicillin and antibiotics have cured diseases whereas the fabrication of the atom bomb has resulted in wiping out entire towns and populations. It all goes to show that science is a double-edged weapon because it can be used both for good and evil purposes. Herein comes a crucial question of ethics. Is it not possible for a scientist to say no when asked to take up research that may one day lead to destruction? This poser has been troubling the participants in research activity for decades. Noelle Lenoir, who has served as a chairperson on the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO and is now heading the European Commission's Group of Advisers on the Ethical Implication of Biotechnology, has done well to highlight several related issues in the World Science Report.

While bitter disputes followed the dropping of the atom bombs over the two Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, there was no organised reaction as such. But the developments in biology like genetic engineering, which is nothing but a process of modifying living organisms, led to an ethics movement even three decades ago. Significantly enough, a conference of geneticists meeting at Azilomar in the U.S. declared a moratorium on research for one year, providing a pause for understanding the possible risks to human health and the environment as a result of using genetically-modified organisms. During the 1960s, ethics panels were set up in several countries but France was the first country to establish a national consultative committee for ethics in the life and health sciences. A survey made three years ago by the UNESCO Bioethics Unit pointed to the functioning of more than 200 national ethics committees all over the world. It is interesting to learn that there is now a discernible movement from ethics to law with the aim of protecting human rights faced with the challenge of science and technology. Again, it is worth noting that the Ubter Parliamentary Union placed the issue of the links between bioethics and human rights on its agenda. Essentially, the objective of these efforts is to affirm that the human being is not a mere object for science.

Q. The article is most probably written by a

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 47 It is probably written by a reporter as it merely reports on the events taking place. It is not technical. Hence, it is not written by a scientist. It does not contain social issues. So, it is not written by a social activist.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 48

Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the following question.

While several discoveries in science, ever since people started engaging in organised research activity, have led to a better life for the average human being, it cannot be gainsaid that some have been used to cause untold misery to vast sections. The developments in science and technology have proved to be a mixed blessing - marvellous medical discoveries like penicillin and antibiotics have cured diseases whereas the fabrication of the atom bomb has resulted in wiping out entire towns and populations. It all goes to show that science is a double-edged weapon because it can be used both for good and evil purposes. Herein comes a crucial question of ethics. Is it not possible for a scientist to say no when asked to take up research that may one day lead to destruction? This poser has been troubling the participants in research activity for decades. Noelle Lenoir, who has served as a chairperson on the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO and is now heading the European Commission's Group of Advisers on the Ethical Implication of Biotechnology, has done well to highlight several related issues in the World Science Report.

While bitter disputes followed the dropping of the atom bombs over the two Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, there was no organised reaction as such. But the developments in biology like genetic engineering, which is nothing but a process of modifying living organisms, led to an ethics movement even three decades ago. Significantly enough, a conference of geneticists meeting at Azilomar in the U.S. declared a moratorium on research for one year, providing a pause for understanding the possible risks to human health and the environment as a result of using genetically-modified organisms. During the 1960s, ethics panels were set up in several countries but France was the first country to establish a national consultative committee for ethics in the life and health sciences. A survey made three years ago by the UNESCO Bioethics Unit pointed to the functioning of more than 200 national ethics committees all over the world. It is interesting to learn that there is now a discernible movement from ethics to law with the aim of protecting human rights faced with the challenge of science and technology. Again, it is worth noting that the Ubter Parliamentary Union placed the issue of the links between bioethics and human rights on its agenda. Essentially, the objective of these efforts is to affirm that the human being is not a mere object for science.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 48 The reason why there was no organised reaction has not been mentioned in the passage. It could be that the after effects and repercussions were not clear at that time. Nuclear bombs had been used for the first time. Nothing specific has been mentioned. So, option (d) is the correct answer.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 49

What was India's position in the 58th edition of EY's 'Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index' (RECAI) released in 2021?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 49 India remained at the third position in the 58th edition of EY's 'Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index' (RECAI) released in 2021, which ranks the world's top 40 markets (nations) on the attractiveness of their renewable energy investment and deployment opportunities.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 50

What is the name of India's first manned ocean mission launched in 2021?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 50 India's first manned ocean mission 'Samudrayan' was launched in 2021 by Union Minister Jitendra Singh. With this, the nation joined an elite club of nations having such underwater vehicles for carrying out subsea activities.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 51

NASA in 2021 launched a spacecraft with one simple mission: Smash into an asteroid. Name the mission.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 51 NASA in 2021 launched a spacecraft with one simple mission: Smash into an asteroid at 15,000 miles per hour.

The mission 'Double Asteroid Redirection Test', or DART, left Earth to test whether slamming a spacecraft into an asteroid can nudge it into a different trajectory. Results from the test, if successful, would come in handy if NASA and other space agencies ever needed to deflect an asteroid to save Earth and avert a catastrophic impact.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 52

Which among the following was/were the theme(s) of Aadhaar Hackathon 2021?

(a) Identity and Authentication

(b) Security and Validation

(c) Enrolment and Update

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 52 Aadhaar Hackathon 2021 was themed around two topics. The first theme was around Enrolment and Update, which essentially covered some of the real-life challenges being faced by the residents while updating their address.

The second theme of the Hackathon was around the Identity and Authentication solution offered by UIDAI.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 53

Which of the following commissions was appointed for creation of new states on the basis of language?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 53 In 1953, the government was forced to create a separate state of Andhra Pradesh for Telugu-speaking people following the long-drawn agitation and death of Potti Sriramulu after a hunger strike for 56 days. This led to the demand for creation of states on linguistic basis from other parts of country, and on 22nd December, 1953, Jawaharlal Nehru announced the appointment of a commission under Fazl Ali to consider this demand.

In December 1953 the Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru nominated the State Reorganization Commission. Fazal Ali, who was the former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court was the chief of this new commission. The working of the committee was supervised by the Home Minister, Govind Ballabh Pant. An announcement with suggestions on reorganizing the Indian states was fulfilled by the State Reorganization Commission on 30th September 1955. Thereafter, these were disputed in the Indian Parliament. Eventually, on 31 August, the State Reorganization Act was authorized, and it was formulated as a law. The State Reorganization Commission came into impact on 1st November 1956.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 54

The Folio Prize is associated with

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 54 The Rathbones Folio Prize, previously known as the Folio Prize and the Literature Prize, is a literary award that was sponsored by the London-based publisher The Folio Society for its first two years, 2014-2015. In December 2016, it was announced that its new sponsor is Rathbone Investment Management Ltd.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 55

In October 2021, which state's Chief Minister announced a free education scheme in state, under the state's 'Super 100 Programme'?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 55 In 2021, Chief Minister of Haryana, Manohar Lal Khattar, announced a free education scheme in state, to boost the level of education in the state.

The scheme was announced for those whose verified family income is lower than Rs. 1.80 lakh per annum. The announcement was made under Haryana's 'Super 100 Programme'.

Through this scheme, the state government seeks to ensure that no talented student, belonging to a poor family, loses a chance to go with his or her dreams.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 56

Proba-1 mini satellite which completed 20 years of operation in October 2021, belonged to which space agency?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 56 ESA's Proba-1 mini satellite was launched after two decades, in October 2021, into orbit. The mini satellite remained fully operational for 20 years.

It is the oldest serving Earth observing mission of the agency.

Proba-1 is roughly the size of a hotel fridge. It hosts two Earth-observing instruments together with several technological firsts.

Proba-1 is the first in ESA's (European Space Agency's) family of 'Project for On-Board Autonomy' missions.

It started life as a technology demonstration satellite and later became an Earth observation mission.

European Space Agency (ESA) is an intergovernmental organisation comprising of 22 member states. It is dedicated for the exploration of space. ESA was established in 1975. It is headquartered in Paris.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 57

__________ won the 'Earth Guardian Award' in 2021, which was instituted by the NatWest Group.

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 57 The Parambikulam Tiger Conservation Foundation (PaTCoF) won the 'Earth Guardian Award' in 2021, which was instituted by the NatWest Group.

PaTCoF is a non-profit organisation under the forest department which seeks to facilitate conservation of tiger and biodiversity in the Parambikulam Tiger Reserve.

Eight winners of the award were felicitated by the Secretary General of 'UN Convention on International Trade in the Endangered Species of Wild Fauna & Flora', Ivonne Higuero in a virtual ceremony in October 2021.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 58

Which state in 2021 launched temple gold monetisation scheme to melt into 24 carat gold bars, the unutilised jewellery in the possession of the temples in the state?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 58 Tamil Nadu Chief Minister M. K. Stalin launched temple gold monetisation scheme in 2021 to melt into 24 carat gold bars, the unutilised jewellery in the possession of the temples in the State.

The temple gold monetisation scheme was launched in 1979 and under this, the gold offered by devotees to nine major temples was converted into gold bars.

SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 59

Who was the first woman to become a High Court judge in India?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 59 Justice Anna Chandy, also known as Anna Chandi, was the first female judge in India. She was also the first woman in India to become a High Court judge.
SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 60

Who was the Prime Minister of Britain when India got independence?

Detailed Solution for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) - Question 60 Clement Richard Attlee was a British statesman of the Labour Party who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951 and Leader of the Labour Party from 1935 to 1955.
Use Code STAYHOME200 and get INR 200 additional OFF
Use Coupon Code
Information about SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) Page
In this test you can find the Exam questions for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern) solved & explained in the simplest way possible. Besides giving Questions and answers for SLAT Mock Test - 6 (New Pattern), EduRev gives you an ample number of Online tests for practice