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Test: Idioms- 1 - Class 9 MCQ


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10 Questions MCQ Test English Olympiad for Class 9 - Test: Idioms- 1

Test: Idioms- 1 for Class 9 2024 is part of English Olympiad for Class 9 preparation. The Test: Idioms- 1 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 9 exam syllabus.The Test: Idioms- 1 MCQs are made for Class 9 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Idioms- 1 below.
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Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 1

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. At one's fingertips

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 1
Explanation:
- The idiom "at one's fingertips" means to have complete knowledge or easy access to something.
- It does not mean to take revenge or be a matter of shame.
- Therefore, the correct option is C: Complete knowledge.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 2

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. All in all

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 2

Idiom: All in all
The correct option for the idiom "All in all" is D: Most important.
Explanation:
- The idiom "All in all" means considering everything; in conclusion; when everything is taken into account.
- It is used to summarize or emphasize the main points or the most important aspect of a situation.
- Here, option D: Most important aligns with the meaning of the idiom.
- Let's break down the other options to understand why they are incorrect:
Option A: Every person
- The idiom "All in all" does not refer to every person, but rather to the overall assessment or conclusion.
Option B: Particular thing same in all
- This option does not capture the meaning of the idiom. "All in all" does not refer to a particular thing being the same in all.
Option C: Call all at once
- "All in all" does not mean to call all at once. It is used to express a comprehensive perspective or final judgment.
Therefore, the correct option for the idiom "All in all" is D: Most important.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 3

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. Apple pie order

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 3
Explanation:
The correct option for the idiom "Apple pie order" is D: In perfect order.
- The idiom "Apple pie order" is used to describe something that is neat, tidy, and well-organized.
- It originated from the phrase "apple-pie bed," which refers to a prank where the sheets are folded in a way that makes it difficult to get into bed.
- In contrast, "apple pie order" means that everything is in perfect order, just like a neatly made bed.
- The idiom is not related to random order, fruit packing, or dry fruit packing.
In conclusion, the correct option for the idiom "Apple pie order" is D: In perfect order.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 4

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. As fit as a fiddle

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 4

The correct option for the idiom "As fit as a fiddle" is D: None of the above.
Explanation:
- "As fit as a fiddle" is an idiom that means to be in very good physical condition or health.
- None of the given options accurately describe the meaning of the idiom.
- Option A states that it means "very weak," which is incorrect as the idiom implies the opposite.
- Option B suggests that it means "recovering from illness," but this is not accurate as it refers to being in good health, not recovering from an illness.
- Option C states that it means "looks fit but not fit actually," which is also incorrect. The idiom implies genuine physical fitness, not just a superficial appearance.
Therefore, the correct option is D: None of the above, as none of the given options accurately represent the meaning of the idiom "As fit as a fiddle."
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 5

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. An apple of discord

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 5

Idiom: An apple of discord
The correct option for the given idiom "An apple of discord" is (D) cause of quarrel. This idiom refers to something that causes disagreement or conflict among people. It originates from Greek mythology, where an apple thrown by the goddess Eris led to a dispute among the goddesses and ultimately triggered the Trojan War.
Explanation:
- Cause of wealth: This option is incorrect as "An apple of discord" does not refer to something that causes wealth.
- Cause of illness: This option is incorrect as "An apple of discord" does not refer to something that causes illness.
- Cause of happiness: This option is incorrect as "An apple of discord" does not refer to something that causes happiness.
- Cause of quarrel: This option is correct as "An apple of discord" refers to something that causes disagreement or conflict among people.
Therefore, the correct option for the given idiom is (D) cause of quarrel.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 6

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. A load of cobblers

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 6

The correct option for the idiom "A load of cobblers" is C: Rubbish.
Explanation:
This idiom is a British slang that means something is nonsense or untrue. It is derived from the phrase "a load of cobblers' wax" which refers to the wax used by cobblers to seal the stitching on shoes. Here, the word "cobblers" is a euphemism for testicles, and the idiom implies that the statement or information being referred to is as worthless as cobblers' wax.
To summarize:
- The idiom "A load of cobblers" means something is rubbish or nonsense.
- It is derived from the phrase "a load of cobblers' wax" used by cobblers.
- The term "cobblers" is a euphemism for testicles.
- The idiom implies that the information or statement being referred to is as worthless as cobblers' wax.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 7

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. At one fell swoop

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 7

Definition:
"At one fell swoop" is an idiom that means doing something all at once or in a single action.
Explanation:
The correct option for the given idiom "At one fell swoop" is B: In a single action. Let's break down the other options and explain why they are not the correct answers:
A: After lots of thinking
- This option does not align with the meaning of the idiom. "At one fell swoop" does not imply any thinking or contemplation but rather describes a swift and decisive action.
C: By mistake
- This option does not capture the essence of the idiom. "At one fell swoop" refers to a deliberate and intentional action, not an accidental or mistaken one.
D: Joint action
- While joint action may be possible in some contexts, the idiom "At one fell swoop" does not specifically imply a joint or collective effort. It focuses on the idea of accomplishing something quickly and efficiently.
Therefore, the correct option is B: In a single action, as it accurately represents the meaning of the idiom "At one fell swoop".
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 8

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. At dagger's drawn

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 8

The correct option for the idiom "At dagger's drawn" is A: to have bitter enmity.
Explanation:
- "At dagger's drawn" is an idiomatic expression that means to have bitter enmity or to be in a state of intense hostility or conflict with someone.
- The idiom refers to a situation where two people are so opposed to each other that they are ready to fight with daggers.
- It indicates a high level of animosity and a complete breakdown of friendly relations.
- The idiom can be used to describe a heated argument, a fierce rivalry, or a deep-seated grudge between individuals or groups.
In summary, the idiom "At dagger's drawn" means to have bitter enmity or to be in a state of intense hostility with someone.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 9

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. At sea

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 9

The correct option for the idiom "At sea" is A: baffled.
Explanation:
- The idiom "At sea" means to be confused or puzzled.
- It is derived from the literal meaning of being lost or disoriented at sea, where there are no landmarks or points of reference.
- When someone is "at sea" in a figurative sense, they are unsure or uncertain about something.
- The options B, C, and D are incorrect as they do not convey the meaning of confusion or being puzzled.
- Option A, "baffled", is the correct choice as it means to be completely confused or bewildered.
In conclusion, when someone is "at sea", they are confused or puzzled, and the correct option to choose is A: baffled.
Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 10

Direction: Choose the correct option for each of the given idioms.

Q. At sixes and sevens

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms- 1 - Question 10
Explanation:
The idiom "at sixes and sevens" means to be in a state of confusion or disorder. Here's a detailed explanation of each option:
A: In perfect order
- This option is incorrect because "at sixes and sevens" means the opposite of being in perfect order.
B: Very happy
- This option is incorrect because "at sixes and sevens" does not refer to being happy. It refers to being in a state of confusion or disorder.
C: In disorder
- This option is correct. "At sixes and sevens" means to be in a state of confusion or disorder. It originated from a medieval game called "hazard" where the numbers six and seven were considered difficult and risky.
D: Very sad
- This option is incorrect because "at sixes and sevens" does not refer to being sad. It refers to being in a state of confusion or disorder.
In conclusion, the correct option for the idiom "at sixes and sevens" is C: In disorder.
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