Test: Reading Comprehension- 1


10 Questions MCQ Test English Grammar for Class 9 | Test: Reading Comprehension- 1


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Attempt Test: Reading Comprehension- 1 | 10 questions in 10 minutes | Mock test for Class 9 preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study English Grammar for Class 9 for Class 9 Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
QUESTION: 1

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Wangari Maathai devoted her life in protecting our planet and serving its people. As an academic, an activist and the founder of the Green Belt Movement, Wangari believed that saving our planet and changing our world went hand in hand. Through her work with the Green Belt movement, Wangari provided thousands of women with job training and opportunities and was responsible for the planting of millions of trees in her native country, Kenya. Wangari died of ovarian cancer in 2011, but not before leaving a substantial mark on the world she loved so much.

Wangari was born in a small village in Kenya in 1940. When she was eight years old, her family decided to send her to school. This was an unusual opportunity for girls in Kenya at this time but Wangari soon began to excel academically. In 1960, she earned a scholarship that allowed her to travel to the United States and attend college. She studied at a small Catholic school in Kansas where, in 1964, she earned her bachelor’s degree in biology. From there, she moved to the University of Pittsburgh, where she earned a master’s degree in biological sciences. After completing her master’s degree, Wangari briefly studied in Germany before returning to Africa, where she continued her education at the University of Nairobi in her home country of Kenya. In 1971, she earned her doctorate in veterinary anatomy, making her the first woman in all of East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree. She continued to make history throughout her career in academics, eventually becoming the first woman in the region to chair a department and the first to become an associate professor.

In addition to her work as a professor, Wangari was also extremely active with the National Council of Women. In 1976, the same year she began chairing the Veterinary Anatomy department at the University of Nairobi, Wangari began talking to the Council of Women about an idea that would form the basis of the Green Belt Movement.

Q. Wangari believed that the world couldn’t be changed without

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Wangari Maathai devoted her life in protecting our planet and serving its people. As an academic, an activist and the founder of the Green Belt Movement, Wangari believed that saving our planet and changing our world went hand in hand. Through her work with the Green Belt movement, Wangari provided thousands of women with job training and opportunities and was responsible for the planting of millions of trees in her native country, Kenya. Wangari died of ovarian cancer in 2011, but not before leaving a substantial mark on the world she loved so much.

Wangari was born in a small village in Kenya in 1940. When she was eight years old, her family decided to send her to school. This was an unusual opportunity for girls in Kenya at this time but Wangari soon began to excel academically. In 1960, she earned a scholarship that allowed her to travel to the United States and attend college. She studied at a small Catholic school in Kansas where, in 1964, she earned her bachelor’s degree in biology. From there, she moved to the University of Pittsburgh, where she earned a master’s degree in biological sciences. After completing her master’s degree, Wangari briefly studied in Germany before returning to Africa, where she continued her education at the University of Nairobi in her home country of Kenya. In 1971, she earned her doctorate in veterinary anatomy, making her the first woman in all of East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree. She continued to make history throughout her career in academics, eventually becoming the first woman in the region to chair a department and the first to become an associate professor.

In addition to her work as a professor, Wangari was also extremely active with the National Council of Women. In 1976, the same year she began chairing the Veterinary Anatomy department at the University of Nairobi, Wangari began talking to the Council of Women about an idea that would form the basis of the Green Belt Movement.

Q. Identify the word from para 2 whose antonym is ‘common’.

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Wangari Maathai devoted her life in protecting our planet and serving its people. As an academic, an activist and the founder of the Green Belt Movement, Wangari believed that saving our planet and changing our world went hand in hand. Through her work with the Green Belt movement, Wangari provided thousands of women with job training and opportunities and was responsible for the planting of millions of trees in her native country, Kenya. Wangari died of ovarian cancer in 2011, but not before leaving a substantial mark on the world she loved so much.

Wangari was born in a small village in Kenya in 1940. When she was eight years old, her family decided to send her to school. This was an unusual opportunity for girls in Kenya at this time but Wangari soon began to excel academically. In 1960, she earned a scholarship that allowed her to travel to the United States and attend college. She studied at a small Catholic school in Kansas where, in 1964, she earned her bachelor’s degree in biology. From there, she moved to the University of Pittsburgh, where she earned a master’s degree in biological sciences. After completing her master’s degree, Wangari briefly studied in Germany before returning to Africa, where she continued her education at the University of Nairobi in her home country of Kenya. In 1971, she earned her doctorate in veterinary anatomy, making her the first woman in all of East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree. She continued to make history throughout her career in academics, eventually becoming the first woman in the region to chair a department and the first to become an associate professor.

In addition to her work as a professor, Wangari was also extremely active with the National Council of Women. In 1976, the same year she began chairing the Veterinary Anatomy department at the University of Nairobi, Wangari began talking to the Council of Women about an idea that would form the basis of the Green Belt Movement.

Q. Wangari could travel and attend college in the United States because

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

The phases of the Moon last approximately one month so it was easy for ancient people to measure that length of time. However, every society needs a length of time shorter than a month but longer than a day so the week was invented.

Sunday is, obviously named after the Sun and Monday is named after the Moon. Saturday is named after Saturn. The other days of the week are named after Germanic gods. Tuesday is named after Tiw, the god of war. Wednesday is named after Woden, the chief god. Thursday is named after Thor, the god of thunder and Friday is named after the Goddess Frigg.

In 45 BC Julius Caesar introduced a new calendar with 12 months. He also added a leap year.

The Romans celebrated New Year on 1 March so the name September is derived from Latin words meaning seventh month. October was the 8th month, November was the 9th month and December was the 10th month. In England, New Year was not in January until 1752. January is named after the Roman god Janus, who was the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. February may be named after the Roman festival of Februa. March is named after Mars the god of war. June is named after the goddess Juno and July is named after Julius Caesar. August is named after Augustus Caesar. The origin of the names of the other months is not certain. April is believed to be derived from the Latin word aperire, which means to open because buds opened at that time. May may be named after the Goddess Maia.

In 1582, Pope Gregory 13th introduced a new calendar. The calendar went forward 10 days and century years (like 1800) would no longer be leap years unless they were divisible by four. Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752 but in Russia, it was not adopted until after the revolution of 1917.

In the early years of Christianity there was a dispute over the date of Easter. In 325, the Nicean Council decided it should be on the first Sunday after the full moon after the Spring Equinox. That is why the date of Easter changes each year. Christmas is, of course, Jesus’ birthday. However, it is very unlikely Jesus was really born on 25 December! In ancient times most pagans held some kind of mid-winter festival. Instead of abolishing the old pagan festivals the Church took them over and ‘Christianized’ them. In 354 AD 25 December was fixed as the birthday of Christ.

At the end of the 5th century a monk named Dionysius the Short introduced a new way of calculating dates. Previously dates were calculated from the foundation of Rome. Dates were now calculated from before the birth of Jesus (BC) or before Christ and in the year of Our Lord (AD or anno Domini). However, Dionysius miscalculated and Jesus was actually born in at least 4 BC.

Before the Reformation people would often record the date by writing Saint so-and-so’s day rather than writing the day of the month. Many saints days were days of rest and our word holiday is derived from holy day.

In an agricultural society life was dominated by the seasons. The old word for Spring was Lenten (related to our word lengthen because the days lengthen at that time). Later it came to mean the days before Easter and it was shortened to Lent. The word Spring was first used for this season in the 16th century.

Q. The Gregorian calendar

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

The phases of the Moon last approximately one month so it was easy for ancient people to measure that length of time. However, every society needs a length of time shorter than a month but longer than a day so the week was invented.

Sunday is, obviously named after the Sun and Monday is named after the Moon. Saturday is named after Saturn. The other days of the week are named after Germanic gods. Tuesday is named after Tiw, the god of war. Wednesday is named after Woden, the chief god. Thursday is named after Thor, the god of thunder and Friday is named after the Goddess Frigg.

In 45 BC Julius Caesar introduced a new calendar with 12 months. He also added a leap year.

The Romans celebrated New Year on 1 March so the name September is derived from Latin words meaning seventh month. October was the 8th month, November was the 9th month and December was the 10th month. In England, New Year was not in January until 1752. January is named after the Roman god Janus, who was the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. February may be named after the Roman festival of Februa. March is named after Mars the god of war. June is named after the goddess Juno and July is named after Julius Caesar. August is named after Augustus Caesar. The origin of the names of the other months is not certain. April is believed to be derived from the Latin word aperire, which means to open because buds opened at that time. May may be named after the Goddess Maia.

In 1582, Pope Gregory 13th introduced a new calendar. The calendar went forward 10 days and century years (like 1800) would no longer be leap years unless they were divisible by four. Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752 but in Russia, it was not adopted until after the revolution of 1917.

In the early years of Christianity there was a dispute over the date of Easter. In 325, the Nicean Council decided it should be on the first Sunday after the full moon after the Spring Equinox. That is why the date of Easter changes each year. Christmas is, of course, Jesus’ birthday. However, it is very unlikely Jesus was really born on 25 December! In ancient times most pagans held some kind of mid-winter festival. Instead of abolishing the old pagan festivals the Church took them over and ‘Christianized’ them. In 354 AD 25 December was fixed as the birthday of Christ.

At the end of the 5th century a monk named Dionysius the Short introduced a new way of calculating dates. Previously dates were calculated from the foundation of Rome. Dates were now calculated from before the birth of Jesus (BC) or before Christ and in the year of Our Lord (AD or anno Domini). However, Dionysius miscalculated and Jesus was actually born in at least 4 BC.

Before the Reformation people would often record the date by writing Saint so-and-so’s day rather than writing the day of the month. Many saints days were days of rest and our word holiday is derived from holy day.

In an agricultural society life was dominated by the seasons. The old word for Spring was Lenten (related to our word lengthen because the days lengthen at that time). Later it came to mean the days before Easter and it was shortened to Lent. The word Spring was first used for this season in the 16th century.

Q. The word ‘pagan’ in para 6 means people

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

The phases of the Moon last approximately one month so it was easy for ancient people to measure that length of time. However, every society needs a length of time shorter than a month but longer than a day so the week was invented.

Sunday is, obviously named after the Sun and Monday is named after the Moon. Saturday is named after Saturn. The other days of the week are named after Germanic gods. Tuesday is named after Tiw, the god of war. Wednesday is named after Woden, the chief god. Thursday is named after Thor, the god of thunder and Friday is named after the Goddess Frigg.

In 45 BC Julius Caesar introduced a new calendar with 12 months. He also added a leap year.

The Romans celebrated New Year on 1 March so the name September is derived from Latin words meaning seventh month. October was the 8th month, November was the 9th month and December was the 10th month. In England, New Year was not in January until 1752. January is named after the Roman god Janus, who was the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. February may be named after the Roman festival of Februa. March is named after Mars the god of war. June is named after the goddess Juno and July is named after Julius Caesar. August is named after Augustus Caesar. The origin of the names of the other months is not certain. April is believed to be derived from the Latin word aperire, which means to open because buds opened at that time. May may be named after the Goddess Maia.

In 1582, Pope Gregory 13th introduced a new calendar. The calendar went forward 10 days and century years (like 1800) would no longer be leap years unless they were divisible by four. Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752 but in Russia, it was not adopted until after the revolution of 1917.

In the early years of Christianity there was a dispute over the date of Easter. In 325, the Nicean Council decided it should be on the first Sunday after the full moon after the Spring Equinox. That is why the date of Easter changes each year. Christmas is, of course, Jesus’ birthday. However, it is very unlikely Jesus was really born on 25 December! In ancient times most pagans held some kind of mid-winter festival. Instead of abolishing the old pagan festivals the Church took them over and ‘Christianized’ them. In 354 AD 25 December was fixed as the birthday of Christ.

At the end of the 5th century a monk named Dionysius the Short introduced a new way of calculating dates. Previously dates were calculated from the foundation of Rome. Dates were now calculated from before the birth of Jesus (BC) or before Christ and in the year of Our Lord (AD or anno Domini). However, Dionysius miscalculated and Jesus was actually born in at least 4 BC.

Before the Reformation people would often record the date by writing Saint so-and-so’s day rather than writing the day of the month. Many saints days were days of rest and our word holiday is derived from holy day.

In an agricultural society life was dominated by the seasons. The old word for Spring was Lenten (related to our word lengthen because the days lengthen at that time). Later it came to mean the days before Easter and it was shortened to Lent. The word Spring was first used for this season in the 16th century.

Q. Which of the following is not true ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

The phases of the Moon last approximately one month so it was easy for ancient people to measure that length of time. However, every society needs a length of time shorter than a month but longer than a day so the week was invented.

Sunday is, obviously named after the Sun and Monday is named after the Moon. Saturday is named after Saturn. The other days of the week are named after Germanic gods. Tuesday is named after Tiw, the god of war. Wednesday is named after Woden, the chief god. Thursday is named after Thor, the god of thunder and Friday is named after the Goddess Frigg.

In 45 BC Julius Caesar introduced a new calendar with 12 months. He also added a leap year.

The Romans celebrated New Year on 1 March so the name September is derived from Latin words meaning seventh month. October was the 8th month, November was the 9th month and December was the 10th month. In England, New Year was not in January until 1752. January is named after the Roman god Janus, who was the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. February may be named after the Roman festival of Februa. March is named after Mars the god of war. June is named after the goddess Juno and July is named after Julius Caesar. August is named after Augustus Caesar. The origin of the names of the other months is not certain. April is believed to be derived from the Latin word aperire, which means to open because buds opened at that time. May may be named after the Goddess Maia.

In 1582, Pope Gregory 13th introduced a new calendar. The calendar went forward 10 days and century years (like 1800) would no longer be leap years unless they were divisible by four. Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752 but in Russia, it was not adopted until after the revolution of 1917.

In the early years of Christianity there was a dispute over the date of Easter. In 325, the Nicean Council decided it should be on the first Sunday after the full moon after the Spring Equinox. That is why the date of Easter changes each year. Christmas is, of course, Jesus’ birthday. However, it is very unlikely Jesus was really born on 25 December! In ancient times most pagans held some kind of mid-winter festival. Instead of abolishing the old pagan festivals the Church took them over and ‘Christianized’ them. In 354 AD 25 December was fixed as the birthday of Christ.

At the end of the 5th century a monk named Dionysius the Short introduced a new way of calculating dates. Previously dates were calculated from the foundation of Rome. Dates were now calculated from before the birth of Jesus (BC) or before Christ and in the year of Our Lord (AD or anno Domini). However, Dionysius miscalculated and Jesus was actually born in at least 4 BC.

Before the Reformation people would often record the date by writing Saint so-and-so’s day rather than writing the day of the month. Many saints days were days of rest and our word holiday is derived from holy day.

In an agricultural society life was dominated by the seasons. The old word for Spring was Lenten (related to our word lengthen because the days lengthen at that time). Later it came to mean the days before Easter and it was shortened to Lent. The word Spring was first used for this season in the 16th century.

Q. The word ‘foundation’ in para 7 can be replaced by the word

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Chyur tree is commonly known as ‘Phulwara’ in northern India, ‘Chyur’ in Nepal and ‘Gophal’ in Bengal. It is found in the Himalayan regions at an altitude of 500 to 1200 metres. Chyur tree resembles an umbrella. This tree is large and shady with dense leaves. Its pulpy fruit gets a thick skin on ripening. People in the mountains call it Kalpavriksha. It is also known as ‘Indian Butter Tree’ as it produces oilseeds, which are rich in oil contents and at lower temperature transforms into fat and looks like butter or ghee.

Fertile, moist soil is required for planting and growing of Chyur tree. It bears flowers and fruits from October to January. As this tree blossoms, the atmosphere becomes fragrant and fascinating. The honey made from its flowers is of high quality and is full of nutrients. The oil extracted is called the ghee of Chyur.

Local people extract juice from its flowers and boil it to make jaggery. Ayurvedic physicians use it as medicine. The seed oil, honey and gur make the tree prominent in rural economy. Many cosmetic industries in India use a chemical called palmolic oil which is made from the oil of this tree. Oil cake left after extracting the oil is used as manure in the fields. This oil cake contains a chemical called saponin from which pesticide is made. If the chemical is separated from the oil cakes, it can be utilised as a nutritious food for animals. Chyur trees contribute greatly towards prevention of landslides and soil erosion. Its long and broad leaves have the ability to collect soil, water and food materials.

For the past many years, Government of India have been formulating various plans for making the country selfsufficient in edible and non-edible oils. Whereas, the wasteland development has been one of the thrust areas in the Government plans, on the one hand, the self-sufficiency in edible and non-edible oils has been identified as a timely demand on the other. Keeping in view of the above, the plantation of Chyur trees on wastelands throughout the Himalayan sub-tropical belt and in Andaman and Nicobar Islands would be a prudent and wise measure.

Q. The oil cake contains

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Chyur tree is commonly known as ‘Phulwara’ in northern India, ‘Chyur’ in Nepal and ‘Gophal’ in Bengal. It is found in the Himalayan regions at an altitude of 500 to 1200 metres. Chyur tree resembles an umbrella. This tree is large and shady with dense leaves. Its pulpy fruit gets a thick skin on ripening. People in the mountains call it Kalpavriksha. It is also known as ‘Indian Butter Tree’ as it produces oilseeds, which are rich in oil contents and at lower temperature transforms into fat and looks like butter or ghee.

Fertile, moist soil is required for planting and growing of Chyur tree. It bears flowers and fruits from October to January. As this tree blossoms, the atmosphere becomes fragrant and fascinating. The honey made from its flowers is of high quality and is full of nutrients. The oil extracted is called the ghee of Chyur.

Local people extract juice from its flowers and boil it to make jaggery. Ayurvedic physicians use it as medicine. The seed oil, honey and gur make the tree prominent in rural economy. Many cosmetic industries in India use a chemical called palmolic oil which is made from the oil of this tree. Oil cake left after extracting the oil is used as manure in the fields. This oil cake contains a chemical called saponin from which pesticide is made. If the chemical is separated from the oil cakes, it can be utilised as a nutritious food for animals. Chyur trees contribute greatly towards prevention of landslides and soil erosion. Its long and broad leaves have the ability to collect soil, water and food materials.

For the past many years, Government of India have been formulating various plans for making the country selfsufficient in edible and non-edible oils. Whereas, the wasteland development has been one of the thrust areas in the Government plans, on the one hand, the self-sufficiency in edible and non-edible oils has been identified as a timely demand on the other. Keeping in view of the above, the plantation of Chyur trees on wastelands throughout the Himalayan sub-tropical belt and in Andaman and Nicobar Islands would be a prudent and wise measure.

Q. Which one of these oil used by cosmetic industries?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Chyur tree is commonly known as ‘Phulwara’ in northern India, ‘Chyur’ in Nepal and ‘Gophal’ in Bengal. It is found in the Himalayan regions at an altitude of 500 to 1200 metres. Chyur tree resembles an umbrella. This tree is large and shady with dense leaves. Its pulpy fruit gets a thick skin on ripening. People in the mountains call it Kalpavriksha. It is also known as ‘Indian Butter Tree’ as it produces oilseeds, which are rich in oil contents and at lower temperature transforms into fat and looks like butter or ghee.

Fertile, moist soil is required for planting and growing of Chyur tree. It bears flowers and fruits from October to January. As this tree blossoms, the atmosphere becomes fragrant and fascinating. The honey made from its flowers is of high quality and is full of nutrients. The oil extracted is called the ghee of Chyur.

Local people extract juice from its flowers and boil it to make jaggery. Ayurvedic physicians use it as medicine. The seed oil, honey and gur make the tree prominent in rural economy. Many cosmetic industries in India use a chemical called palmolic oil which is made from the oil of this tree. Oil cake left after extracting the oil is used as manure in the fields. This oil cake contains a chemical called saponin from which pesticide is made. If the chemical is separated from the oil cakes, it can be utilised as a nutritious food for animals. Chyur trees contribute greatly towards prevention of landslides and soil erosion. Its long and broad leaves have the ability to collect soil, water and food materials.

For the past many years, Government of India have been formulating various plans for making the country selfsufficient in edible and non-edible oils. Whereas, the wasteland development has been one of the thrust areas in the Government plans, on the one hand, the self-sufficiency in edible and non-edible oils has been identified as a timely demand on the other. Keeping in view of the above, the plantation of Chyur trees on wastelands throughout the Himalayan sub-tropical belt and in Andaman and Nicobar Islands would be a prudent and wise measure.

Q. The oil extracted from Chyur tree is called __________ of Chyur.

Solution:
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