Test: Reading Comprehension- 2


10 Questions MCQ Test English Grammar for Class 9 | Test: Reading Comprehension- 2


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Attempt Test: Reading Comprehension- 2 | 10 questions in 10 minutes | Mock test for Class 9 preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study English Grammar for Class 9 for Class 9 Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
QUESTION: 1

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Clean and Adequate Water

Life cannot be imagined without water, but clean and adequate water is still not accessible to most of the people in India. India receives 90 percent of the water from major or medium rivers. It has 14 major rivers each having catchment area of 20,000 sq. km and above; while there are 44 medium rivers with a coastline between 2000-20,000 sq. kms. Then there are 53 small rivers each with catchment area of 2000 sq. kms.

According to the 2011 census, annual per capita water availability in the country decreased to 1545 cubic meters from 1816 cubic meters as per the 2001 census. At present, this situation is even more worrisome. Scientists believe that by 2050 there will be a 30 percent decrease in the availability of water per person. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the availability of 200 litres of water per person per day in urban areas. On the contrary, 140 litres of water is supplied per person per day in the country.

Water resources in India are predominantly dependent on the monsoon. India receives an average rainfall of 4000 BCM (Billion Cubic Meter) every year from the rain, but most of it is vapourized and goes down the drains. Statistics show that a dearth of storage procedure, lack of adequate infrastructure, inappropriate water management have created a situation where only 18-20% of the water is actually used. The remainder just gets wasted, aggravating the problem of ground water depletion.

Our country’s economy primarily rests on agriculture. Agriculture contributes 40 percent to the GDP of the country, and accounts for 60 percent of the total export revenues. Also, 60 percent of the related work. One of the major reasons for water crisis in the country is that as the area of irrigated land has increased, the level of groundwater has declined.

Currently, India has a gross irrigated crop area of 82.6 million hectares (215.6 million acres), which is the largest in the world. As the population increases, the water storage capacity of ponds decreases. In fact, wells and ponds go dry after the water decreases at the ground level.

Q. What aggravates the problem of ground water depletion?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Clean and Adequate Water

Life cannot be imagined without water, but clean and adequate water is still not accessible to most of the people in India. India receives 90 percent of the water from major or medium rivers. It has 14 major rivers each having catchment area of 20,000 sq. km and above; while there are 44 medium rivers with a coastline between 2000-20,000 sq. kms. Then there are 53 small rivers each with catchment area of 2000 sq. kms.

According to the 2011 census, annual per capita water availability in the country decreased to 1545 cubic meters from 1816 cubic meters as per the 2001 census. At present, this situation is even more worrisome. Scientists believe that by 2050 there will be a 30 percent decrease in the availability of water per person. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the availability of 200 litres of water per person per day in urban areas. On the contrary, 140 litres of water is supplied per person per day in the country.

Water resources in India are predominantly dependent on the monsoon. India receives an average rainfall of 4000 BCM (Billion Cubic Meter) every year from the rain, but most of it is vapourized and goes down the drains. Statistics show that a dearth of storage procedure, lack of adequate infrastructure, inappropriate water management have created a situation where only 18-20% of the water is actually used. The remainder just gets wasted, aggravating the problem of ground water depletion.

Our country’s economy primarily rests on agriculture. Agriculture contributes 40 percent to the GDP of the country, and accounts for 60 percent of the total export revenues. Also, 60 percent of the related work. One of the major reasons for water crisis in the country is that as the area of irrigated land has increased, the level of groundwater has declined.

Currently, India has a gross irrigated crop area of 82.6 million hectares (215.6 million acres), which is the largest in the world. As the population increases, the water storage capacity of ponds decreases. In fact, wells and ponds go dry after the water decreases at the ground level.

Q. As a sector, agriculture contributes to the country’s economy by

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Clean and Adequate Water

Life cannot be imagined without water, but clean and adequate water is still not accessible to most of the people in India. India receives 90 percent of the water from major or medium rivers. It has 14 major rivers each having catchment area of 20,000 sq. km and above; while there are 44 medium rivers with a coastline between 2000-20,000 sq. kms. Then there are 53 small rivers each with catchment area of 2000 sq. kms.

According to the 2011 census, annual per capita water availability in the country decreased to 1545 cubic meters from 1816 cubic meters as per the 2001 census. At present, this situation is even more worrisome. Scientists believe that by 2050 there will be a 30 percent decrease in the availability of water per person. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the availability of 200 litres of water per person per day in urban areas. On the contrary, 140 litres of water is supplied per person per day in the country.

Water resources in India are predominantly dependent on the monsoon. India receives an average rainfall of 4000 BCM (Billion Cubic Meter) every year from the rain, but most of it is vapourized and goes down the drains. Statistics show that a dearth of storage procedure, lack of adequate infrastructure, inappropriate water management have created a situation where only 18-20% of the water is actually used. The remainder just gets wasted, aggravating the problem of ground water depletion.

Our country’s economy primarily rests on agriculture. Agriculture contributes 40 percent to the GDP of the country, and accounts for 60 percent of the total export revenues. Also, 60 percent of the related work. One of the major reasons for water crisis in the country is that as the area of irrigated land has increased, the level of groundwater has declined.

Currently, India has a gross irrigated crop area of 82.6 million hectares (215.6 million acres), which is the largest in the world. As the population increases, the water storage capacity of ponds decreases. In fact, wells and ponds go dry after the water decreases at the ground level.

Q. The problem of ground water depletion cannot be resolved to a large extent unless

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Clean and Adequate Water

Life cannot be imagined without water, but clean and adequate water is still not accessible to most of the people in India. India receives 90 percent of the water from major or medium rivers. It has 14 major rivers each having catchment area of 20,000 sq. km and above; while there are 44 medium rivers with a coastline between 2000-20,000 sq. kms. Then there are 53 small rivers each with catchment area of 2000 sq. kms.

According to the 2011 census, annual per capita water availability in the country decreased to 1545 cubic meters from 1816 cubic meters as per the 2001 census. At present, this situation is even more worrisome. Scientists believe that by 2050 there will be a 30 percent decrease in the availability of water per person. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the availability of 200 litres of water per person per day in urban areas. On the contrary, 140 litres of water is supplied per person per day in the country.

Water resources in India are predominantly dependent on the monsoon. India receives an average rainfall of 4000 BCM (Billion Cubic Meter) every year from the rain, but most of it is vapourized and goes down the drains. Statistics show that a dearth of storage procedure, lack of adequate infrastructure, inappropriate water management have created a situation where only 18-20% of the water is actually used. The remainder just gets wasted, aggravating the problem of ground water depletion.

Our country’s economy primarily rests on agriculture. Agriculture contributes 40 percent to the GDP of the country, and accounts for 60 percent of the total export revenues. Also, 60 percent of the related work. One of the major reasons for water crisis in the country is that as the area of irrigated land has increased, the level of groundwater has declined.

Currently, India has a gross irrigated crop area of 82.6 million hectares (215.6 million acres), which is the largest in the world. As the population increases, the water storage capacity of ponds decreases. In fact, wells and ponds go dry after the water decreases at the ground level.

Q. Which of the following about availability and use of water in India is correct?

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Dabbawala

A dabbawala is a person in Mumbai, whose job is carrying and delivering freshly made food from home in lunch boxes to office workers. They are formally known as MTBSA (Mumbai Tiffin Box Suppliers Association), but most people refer to them as the dabbawalas. The dabbawalas originated when India was under the British rule. Since many British people who came to India did not like the local food, a service was set up to bring lunch to their offices straight from their homes.

Today, businessmen in modern Mumbai use this service and have become the main customers of the dabbawalas. By delivering to each employee his tiffin or lunch, the dabbawalas solve the problem for an estimated 200,000 people. They charge between 150 to 300 per dabba per month, depending on the location and collection time.

They are an incredible team. They have a record of no strikes against management. They are always on time, even through the rainiest days on the planet. Their creativity and ingenuity have kept them alive. When telephones services were at a premium in India, the dabbawalas encouraged housewives to use their system to communicate with their spouses by placing little chits inside their boxes. The husbands enjoyed the chits as much as the food. Thus, the dabbawalas were able to “think outside the box” and broaden their capabilities given in a very limited infrastructure. Dabbawalas have also embraced technology. On March 25, 2006, the dabbawalas went online with www.mydabbawala.com. The dabbawalas have become icons of hard work and dedication. In fact, the 5,000 strong workforce (there are a handful of women) is so well known that Prince Charles paid them a visit during his recent trip to India. Several academic institutions regularly invite the dabbawala’s representatives for discussion, and to complement and enhance their academic content.

Q. They have a record of no strikes against

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Dabbawala

A dabbawala is a person in Mumbai, whose job is carrying and delivering freshly made food from home in lunch boxes to office workers. They are formally known as MTBSA (Mumbai Tiffin Box Suppliers Association), but most people refer to them as the dabbawalas. The dabbawalas originated when India was under the British rule. Since many British people who came to India did not like the local food, a service was set up to bring lunch to their offices straight from their homes.

Today, businessmen in modern Mumbai use this service and have become the main customers of the dabbawalas. By delivering to each employee his tiffin or lunch, the dabbawalas solve the problem for an estimated 200,000 people. They charge between 150 to 300 per dabba per month, depending on the location and collection time.

They are an incredible team. They have a record of no strikes against management. They are always on time, even through the rainiest days on the planet. Their creativity and ingenuity have kept them alive. When telephones services were at a premium in India, the dabbawalas encouraged housewives to use their system to communicate with their spouses by placing little chits inside their boxes. The husbands enjoyed the chits as much as the food. Thus, the dabbawalas were able to “think outside the box” and broaden their capabilities given in a very limited infrastructure. Dabbawalas have also embraced technology. On March 25, 2006, the dabbawalas went online with www.mydabbawala.com. The dabbawalas have become icons of hard work and dedication. In fact, the 5,000 strong workforce (there are a handful of women) is so well known that Prince Charles paid them a visit during his recent trip to India. Several academic institutions regularly invite the dabbawala’s representatives for discussion, and to complement and enhance their academic content.

Q. The working of dabbawalas is a __________ in management and organization.

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Dabbawala

A dabbawala is a person in Mumbai, whose job is carrying and delivering freshly made food from home in lunch boxes to office workers. They are formally known as MTBSA (Mumbai Tiffin Box Suppliers Association), but most people refer to them as the dabbawalas. The dabbawalas originated when India was under the British rule. Since many British people who came to India did not like the local food, a service was set up to bring lunch to their offices straight from their homes.

Today, businessmen in modern Mumbai use this service and have become the main customers of the dabbawalas. By delivering to each employee his tiffin or lunch, the dabbawalas solve the problem for an estimated 200,000 people. They charge between 150 to 300 per dabba per month, depending on the location and collection time.

They are an incredible team. They have a record of no strikes against management. They are always on time, even through the rainiest days on the planet. Their creativity and ingenuity have kept them alive. When telephones services were at a premium in India, the dabbawalas encouraged housewives to use their system to communicate with their spouses by placing little chits inside their boxes. The husbands enjoyed the chits as much as the food. Thus, the dabbawalas were able to “think outside the box” and broaden their capabilities given in a very limited infrastructure. Dabbawalas have also embraced technology. On March 25, 2006, the dabbawalas went online with www.mydabbawala.com. The dabbawalas have become icons of hard work and dedication. In fact, the 5,000 strong workforce (there are a handful of women) is so well known that Prince Charles paid them a visit during his recent trip to India. Several academic institutions regularly invite the dabbawala’s representatives for discussion, and to complement and enhance their academic content.

Q. Dabbawalas are appreciated for their ________ thinking.

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Dabbawala

A dabbawala is a person in Mumbai, whose job is carrying and delivering freshly made food from home in lunch boxes to office workers. They are formally known as MTBSA (Mumbai Tiffin Box Suppliers Association), but most people refer to them as the dabbawalas. The dabbawalas originated when India was under the British rule. Since many British people who came to India did not like the local food, a service was set up to bring lunch to their offices straight from their homes.

Today, businessmen in modern Mumbai use this service and have become the main customers of the dabbawalas. By delivering to each employee his tiffin or lunch, the dabbawalas solve the problem for an estimated 200,000 people. They charge between 150 to 300 per dabba per month, depending on the location and collection time.

They are an incredible team. They have a record of no strikes against management. They are always on time, even through the rainiest days on the planet. Their creativity and ingenuity have kept them alive. When telephones services were at a premium in India, the dabbawalas encouraged housewives to use their system to communicate with their spouses by placing little chits inside their boxes. The husbands enjoyed the chits as much as the food. Thus, the dabbawalas were able to “think outside the box” and broaden their capabilities given in a very limited infrastructure. Dabbawalas have also embraced technology. On March 25, 2006, the dabbawalas went online with www.mydabbawala.com. The dabbawalas have become icons of hard work and dedication. In fact, the 5,000 strong workforce (there are a handful of women) is so well known that Prince Charles paid them a visit during his recent trip to India. Several academic institutions regularly invite the dabbawala’s representatives for discussion, and to complement and enhance their academic content.

Q. The dabbawalas have become icons of __________ .

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Forest Reserves for Birds

Birds are natural wonders of beauty. Flying is the prerogative solely of birds. The entire universe is their home. Their mellifluous calls, queenly dance, gossamer quill and artistic sculpture make them special. India has quite a few forest reserves which are home to some rarely seen and endangered species of birds.

Located about 24km from the Chennai City Centre, Namnangalam is a massive forest sprawling across 2400 hectares, of which 320 is reserved. It is a bird watcher’s paradise and houses about 85 species of birds including the red-wattled lapwing, the white breasted kingfisher, Indian eagle owl and several others. It is also said to be home to rare territorial orchids.

Amarambalam Reserve Forest is one of the largest reserve forests of Kerala. Situated in the Western Ghats, it covers a height ranging from 40m-2500m above sea level and sees heavy rainfall making for a thick forest cover. This forest reserve in India sees a variety of birds, some endemic to the region, and some endangered and near threatened species as well. It is also home to the Lion Tailed Macaque and the Nilgiri Tahr. The forest continues from the Silent Valley National Park and forms a part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve.

Kumarakom bird sanctuary also known as Vembanad bird sanctuary is situated in land of attraction, Kerala, near the famous Vembanad Lake. It offers a home to a large number of migratory birds like Flycatcher, Teal, Siberian Stork, Crane, Parrots and Wood Beetle. Other bird sanctuaries in Kerala are Mangalavanam and Thattekkad bird sanctuary, situated on the banks of the Periyar River and famous for some of the rarest species of birds and other unique fauna.

Q. Which of the following is a migratory bird ?

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Read the following passage and answer the question that follows.

Forest Reserves for Birds

Birds are natural wonders of beauty. Flying is the prerogative solely of birds. The entire universe is their home. Their mellifluous calls, queenly dance, gossamer quill and artistic sculpture make them special. India has quite a few forest reserves which are home to some rarely seen and endangered species of birds.

Located about 24km from the Chennai City Centre, Namnangalam is a massive forest sprawling across 2400 hectares, of which 320 is reserved. It is a bird watcher’s paradise and houses about 85 species of birds including the red-wattled lapwing, the white breasted kingfisher, Indian eagle owl and several others. It is also said to be home to rare territorial orchids.

Amarambalam Reserve Forest is one of the largest reserve forests of Kerala. Situated in the Western Ghats, it covers a height ranging from 40m-2500m above sea level and sees heavy rainfall making for a thick forest cover. This forest reserve in India sees a variety of birds, some endemic to the region, and some endangered and near threatened species as well. It is also home to the Lion Tailed Macaque and the Nilgiri Tahr. The forest continues from the Silent Valley National Park and forms a part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve.

Kumarakom bird sanctuary also known as Vembanad bird sanctuary is situated in land of attraction, Kerala, near the famous Vembanad Lake. It offers a home to a large number of migratory birds like Flycatcher, Teal, Siberian Stork, Crane, Parrots and Wood Beetle. Other bird sanctuaries in Kerala are Mangalavanam and Thattekkad bird sanctuary, situated on the banks of the Periyar River and famous for some of the rarest species of birds and other unique fauna.

Q. Which of the following is true about Kumarakom bird sanctuary ?

Solution:
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