Test: Reading Comprehension - 3


36 Questions MCQ Test English Grammar Class 10 | Test: Reading Comprehension - 3


Description
This mock test of Test: Reading Comprehension - 3 for Class 10 helps you for every Class 10 entrance exam. This contains 36 Multiple Choice Questions for Class 10 Test: Reading Comprehension - 3 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this Test: Reading Comprehension - 3 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. Class 10 students definitely take this Test: Reading Comprehension - 3 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other Test: Reading Comprehension - 3 extra questions, long questions & short questions for Class 10 on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The Pamban bridge used to be:

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Choose the option that best captures the central idea of the passage from the given quotes.
1. “Mistakes are the usual bridge between inexperience and wisdom.”— Phyllis Theroux
2. “The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross, and which to burn.”  — David Russell
3. "What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not a goal." —  Friedrich Nietzsches
4. "Travel is the bridge between you and everything/ —Rumi

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following is NOT TRUE about the Pamban Bridge:

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The Chenab bridge:

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following statements is not true? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The bridge that will connect the north and south bank of river Brahmaputra in Assam is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, this is called the ________ .

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broad-gauge in 

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. A stunning site in the form of yet another railway bridge is coming up in:

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Choose the option that CORRE CT LY states the two aspects of Pamban bridge.
1. Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland.
2. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer.
3. The Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge.
4. Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct.
5. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge,that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following words means the opposite of ‘started’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Read the passage carefully:

1. Till 1988, the Pamban Bridge was the only surface transport that connected Tamil Nadu’s island of Rameswaram to the mainland. Said to be an engineering marvel, the Pamban Bridge was once India’s longest sea bridge, till the Bandra-Worli sea link came up in 2009. What makes Pamban Bridge more wonderful is that it was built more than 100 years ago.
2. The 2.057 km long bridge, also known as Bridge No. 346 in Indian Railway reference, consists of over 140 spans. The amazing feature of a double-leaf section that can be raised to allow movement of ships and boats was designed by German engineer Scherzer. The 114th span, midway along the bridge, is called the Scherzer span.
3. Interestingly, the Scherzer span is now being replaced by a modern one to improve the life of the bridge. Pamban Bridge is a cantilever bridge, that has structures that project horizontally into space, supported only on one end.
4. Until recently, the two leaves of the bridge were opened manually using levers by workers, says Indian Railways. Following cyclone-induced tragic train accident in 1964, Indian Railways installed devices to check the wind velocity across the Pamban via duct. Train movement on the bridge is halted when the wind speed exceeds 58 kmph.
5. The construction of the Pamban Bridge began in 1911 and it was opened in 1914. It was only in 2007 that the railway line on Pamban Bridge was converted from metre-gauge to broadgauge.
6. According to Indian Railways, the famed Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameswaram and the Pamban Bridge draw scores of foreign tourists and inland pilgrims to the island.
7. Even as Indian Railways’ Pamban Bridge continues to be an engineering marvel, yet another railway bridge that is likely to be a stunning site is coming up in Jammu and Kashmir. Said to be the world’s highest railway bridge, the Chenab bridge, is set to be completed by 2019. The bridge will be taller than Paris’ famous Eiffel Tower and is being built to withstand earthquakes.
8. Yet another bridge that will be a landmark is the Bogibeel Bridge - India’s longest rail-cumroad bridge. The Bogibeel double-deck bridge is being built over the Brahmaputra in the Dibrugarh district of Assam and will connect the North and South banks of the river. The total length of the rail-cum-road bridge will be 4.9 km.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following words means the same as ‘eye-catching’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. Consider the following statements about permafrost:
1. it is ground frozen since the Second Ice Age
2. it is ice, soil, rock, sand and organic matter bound together
3. it can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface
4. it is year-round frozen ground for at least one year
Which of the given statements is/are CORRECT?

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. Why is the exposure of darker waters spell disaster for the atmosphere?

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. Consider the following statements:
(A): The Arctic region is warming faster than the rest of the world.
(R): The exposed layer of darker waters is absorbing radiation. Which of the following options is correct with regards to Arctic warming?

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. According to the chart, what is the hottest temperature that the Arctic has reached since 1960?

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. Which of the following are the consequences of heat waves?
1. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 39 degrees Celsius
2. Record fires engulf vast swathes of Siberian Russia

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. How are the fires in boreal forests of the Arctic acting differently?

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. What are ‘zombie fires’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. A peat bog is the accumulation of organic matter which has taken …

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to:

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. Which word in the passage means “becoming liquid or soft due to warming up”?

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. What does the passage warn us about the thawing of the permafrost?

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow:

Thawing Permafrost Could Fuel Climate Warming

1. The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world, and some scientists believe that thawing permafrost — ground frozen since the last Ice Age — is about to release enormous amounts of climate-warming emissions. In the coldest regions of planet Earth, ice binds together soil, rock, sand and organic matter. This layer of permafrost can begin just centimeters below the Earth’s surface. Anywhere cold enough to keep the ground frozen year-round for at least two years counts as permafrost. About a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere contains permafrost.

2. Warmer temperatures in the Arctic are causing snow and ice to disappear. As ice covering the sea shrinks back, it exposes darker waters that absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it back out of the atmosphere. This is called the albedo effect, and helps explain why the Arctic region is warming so much faster than the rest of the world. This chart shows how much average surface air temperatures have changed at different latitudes since 1960.
3. The Siberian Arctic town of Verkhoyansk in June registered a record high temperature of 38 degrees Celsius (100.4 Fahrenheit) during a prolonged heat wave. Record fires have also engulfed vast swathes of Siberian Russia, emitting more carbon dioxide than Switzerland or Norway do in a year.
4. The boreal forests of the Arctic have evolved to survive and thrive from occasional fires that would naturally occur every few decades or centuries in the region. But the more recent fires are different, scientists say. They are starting months earlier than they ever have before, and are smoldering through the winter as underground ‘zombie fires.’
5. The more intense fires are also burning up peat bogs. A forest might grow back in a few decades and reabsorb the carbon it released when it burned; a peat bog is the accumulation of thousands of years of partial decomposition.
6. The best way to prevent permafrost from thawing is to limit climate change by reducing fossil fuel emissions and protecting forests, scientists say. But once permafrost thaws, there’s nothing that can be done to stop the carbon from being released.
Choose the correct option to answer the questions based on the above passage and graphics.

Q. Which word in the passage is opposite to the meaning of ‘wither’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The floating market in Kolkata was made to: 

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Choose the option that best captures the central idea of the passage from the given quotes.
1. “It is the job of the market to turn the base material of our emotions into gold.” — Andrei Codrescu
2. “Where you start in the marketplace is not where you have to stay.” —  Jim Rohn
3. “People who have good relationships at home are more effective at marketplaces.” — Zig Ziglar
4. “In order to be a great marketer, you have to be focused and intense and look at scarcity, urgency, activity and passion in the marketplace.” — Dave Ramsey

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The shopkeepers could reach the boats on the floating market by:

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following helps to maintain the Patuli lake floating market?

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following is not true about the Patuli floating market? 

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The vegetable vendors and local buyers are caused inconvenience in the Patuli market because:

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. The market of ______ is also a floating market.

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Except for the Patuli lake floating market, all other floating markets of Asia are doing ______ business.

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following words mean the same as ‘regenerated’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Choose the option that correctly states the two aspects of people in the marketplace.
1. The local sellers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways.
2. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market.
3. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
4. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food seller.
5. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak.

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following words in the passage means the same as ‘start’?

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Read the passage carefully:

1. With a touch of Bangkok in south Kolkata, the Patuli Lake has been transformed into a floating market. The 24,000 square meters water body accommodates 114 boats to host more than 250 shops selling daily essentials from fruits, vegetables to household items. The market has been functional since its inauguration in January 2018. Each boat has two shops and the shopkeepers sell vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish, meat, fast food, tea, etc. There are walkways for the buyers to shop on water. The idea behind the launch of this market was to rehabilitate 228 shop owners of Baishnabghata-Patuli market as the adjoining area on EM Bypass is under construction to widen the four lanes into six lanes. There are two water bodies, which were merged to set-up the market, equipped with waterproof wooden walkways supported by wooden beams for the buyers and shopkeepers to reach the boat. For the aquatic plants and animals to thrive, there are two aerators to collect oxygen and mix it with water.
2. ₹ 600 is spent every month for maintenance of the market, cleaning the water and the walkways every day. People enjoy the ambience, lights on boats and walkways. As one walks into the market, the colourful giant umbrellas spread across the jetty and colourful green boats with fruits and vegetables create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Unlike Bangkok, there is no provision to shop around in a boat here. However, this hasn’t stopped people from afar to visit this unique market for an evening outing on the weekends. On weekdays, on the other hand, the market wears a rather deserted look.
3. The local buyers complain about the inconvenience of carrying heavy bags on the narrow walkways. The vegetable vendors complain about outside visitors who only click photos and causing more problems for the buyers and the sellers. The only people who seem to be profiting from these are ice-cream and fast-food sellers. The local people are avoiding the market due to this crowd and getting their marketing done from sellers on wheels just outside the market. Sellers fear seasonal problems to discourage buyers to come to the floating market. Most of the people who are visiting this place might have never been to the floating market of Damnoen Saduak to understand that floating markets are struggling all over Asia.
On the basis of your reading of the passage given above, answer of the following questions:

Q. Which of the following words means the opposite of ‘crowded’?

Solution:

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