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Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions


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12 Questions MCQ Test Geography Class 11 | Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions

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Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 1

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The oceans are confined to the great depressions of the earth’s outer layer. The oceans, unlike the continents, merge so naturally into one another that it is hard to demarcate them. The geographers have divided the oceanic part of the earth into five oceans, namely the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian Southern Ocean and the Arctic. The various seas, bays, gulfs and other inlets are parts of these four large oceans. A major portion of the ocean floor is found between 3-6 km below the sea level. The ‘land’ under the waters of the oceans, that is, the ocean floor exhibits complex and varied features as those observed over the land. The floors of the oceans are rugged with the world’s largest mountain ranges, deepest trenches and the largest plains. These features are formed, like those of the continents, by the factors of tectonic, volcanic and depositional processes.

Q. The oceans are confined to which of the Earth’s layer?

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 1 Oceanic crust, the outermost layer of Earth's lithosphere that is found under the oceans and formed at spreading centres on oceanic ridges, which occur at divergent plate boundaries.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 2

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The oceans are confined to the great depressions of the earth’s outer layer. The oceans, unlike the continents, merge so naturally into one another that it is hard to demarcate them. The geographers have divided the oceanic part of the earth into five oceans, namely the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian Southern Ocean and the Arctic. The various seas, bays, gulfs and other inlets are parts of these four large oceans. A major portion of the ocean floor is found between 3-6 km below the sea level. The ‘land’ under the waters of the oceans, that is, the ocean floor exhibits complex and varied features as those observed over the land. The floors of the oceans are rugged with the world’s largest mountain ranges, deepest trenches and the largest plains. These features are formed, like those of the continents, by the factors of tectonic, volcanic and depositional processes.

Q. The ___________of the oceans are rugged with the world’s largest mountain ranges, deepest trenches and the largest plains.

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 2 A major portion of the ocean floor is found between 3-6 km below the sea level. The 'land' under the waters of the oceans, the ocean floor, exhibits similar features as those observed over the land. The floors of the oceans are rugged with the world's largest mountain ranges, deepest trenches and the largest plains.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 3

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The oceans are confined to the great depressions of the earth’s outer layer. The oceans, unlike the continents, merge so naturally into one another that it is hard to demarcate them. The geographers have divided the oceanic part of the earth into five oceans, namely the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian Southern Ocean and the Arctic. The various seas, bays, gulfs and other inlets are parts of these four large oceans. A major portion of the ocean floor is found between 3-6 km below the sea level. The ‘land’ under the waters of the oceans, that is, the ocean floor exhibits complex and varied features as those observed over the land. The floors of the oceans are rugged with the world’s largest mountain ranges, deepest trenches and the largest plains. These features are formed, like those of the continents, by the factors of tectonic, volcanic and depositional processes.

Q. Oceans are hard to _______.

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 3 Studying the ocean floor is difficult because the environment is so hostile. The seafloor can be studied indirectly with tools such as sonar. Some vehicles carry scientists and their devices to the ocean floor. Other vehicles are operated remotely.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 4

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The oceans are confined to the great depressions of the earth’s outer layer. The oceans, unlike the continents, merge so naturally into one another that it is hard to demarcate them. The geographers have divided the oceanic part of the earth into five oceans, namely the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian Southern Ocean and the Arctic. The various seas, bays, gulfs and other inlets are parts of these four large oceans. A major portion of the ocean floor is found between 3-6 km below the sea level. The ‘land’ under the waters of the oceans, that is, the ocean floor exhibits complex and varied features as those observed over the land. The floors of the oceans are rugged with the world’s largest mountain ranges, deepest trenches and the largest plains. These features are formed, like those of the continents, by the factors of tectonic, volcanic and depositional processes.

Q. Where is the major portion of the ocean floor found?

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 4 A major portion of the ocean floor is found between 3-6 km below the sea level. The 'land' under the waters of the oceans, that is, the ocean floor exhibits complex and varied features as those observed over the land.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 5

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The continental shelf is the extended margin of each continent occupied by relatively shallow seas and gulfs. It is the shallowest part of the ocean showing an average gradient of 1° or even less. The shelf typically ends at a very steep slope, called the shelf break. The width of the continental shelves vary from one ocean to another. The average width of continental shelves is about 80 km. The shelves are almost absent or very narrow along some of the margins like the coasts of Chile, the west coast of Sumatra, etc. On the contrary, the Siberian shelf in the Arctic Ocean, the largest in the world, stretches to 1,500 km in width. The depth of the shelves also varies. It may be as shallow as 30 m in some areas while in some areas it is as deep as 600 m. The continental shelves are covered with variable thicknesses of sediments brought down by rivers, glaciers, wind, from the land and distributed by waves and currents. Massive sedimentary deposits received over along time by the continental shelves, become the source of fossil fuels.

Q. _______ is the shallowest part of the ocean.

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 5 Continental drift is the hypothesis that the Earth's continents have moved over geologic time relative to each other, thus appearing to have "drifted" across the ocean bed.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 6

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The continental shelf is the extended margin of each continent occupied by relatively shallow seas and gulfs. It is the shallowest part of the ocean showing an average gradient of 1° or even less. The shelf typically ends at a very steep slope, called the shelf break. The width of the continental shelves vary from one ocean to another. The average width of continental shelves is about 80 km. The shelves are almost absent or very narrow along some of the margins like the coasts of Chile, the west coast of Sumatra, etc. On the contrary, the Siberian shelf in the Arctic Ocean, the largest in the world, stretches to 1,500 km in width. The depth of the shelves also varies. It may be as shallow as 30 m in some areas while in some areas it is as deep as 600 m. The continental shelves are covered with variable thicknesses of sediments brought down by rivers, glaciers, wind, from the land and distributed by waves and currents. Massive sedimentary deposits received over along time by the continental shelves, become the source of fossil fuels.

Q. The continental shelf can be as shallow as _______ metres.

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 6
  • The continental shelf can be as shallow as 30 metres.

  • The term "continental shelf" is used by geologists generally to mean that part of the continental margin which is between the shoreline and the shelf break or, where there is no noticeable slope, between the shoreline and the point where the depth of the superjacent water.

Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 7

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The continental shelf is the extended margin of each continent occupied by relatively shallow seas and gulfs. It is the shallowest part of the ocean showing an average gradient of 1° or even less. The shelf typically ends at a very steep slope, called the shelf break. The width of the continental shelves vary from one ocean to another. The average width of continental shelves is about 80 km. The shelves are almost absent or very narrow along some of the margins like the coasts of Chile, the west coast of Sumatra, etc. On the contrary, the Siberian shelf in the Arctic Ocean, the largest in the world, stretches to 1,500 km in width. The depth of the shelves also varies. It may be as shallow as 30 m in some areas while in some areas it is as deep as 600 m. The continental shelves are covered with variable thicknesses of sediments brought down by rivers, glaciers, wind, from the land and distributed by waves and currents. Massive sedimentary deposits received over along time by the continental shelves, become the source of fossil fuels.

Q. The continental shelf typically ends at a very steep slope, called the __________.

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 7 A continental shelf typically extends from the coast to depths of 100–200 metres (330–660 feet). It is gently inclined seaward at an average slope of about 0.1°. In nearly all instances, it ends at its seaward edge with an abrupt drop called the shelf break.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 8

Direction: Read the case study given below and answer any three of the questions that follow.

The continental shelf is the extended margin of each continent occupied by relatively shallow seas and gulfs. It is the shallowest part of the ocean showing an average gradient of 1° or even less. The shelf typically ends at a very steep slope, called the shelf break. The width of the continental shelves vary from one ocean to another. The average width of continental shelves is about 80 km. The shelves are almost absent or very narrow along some of the margins like the coasts of Chile, the west coast of Sumatra, etc. On the contrary, the Siberian shelf in the Arctic Ocean, the largest in the world, stretches to 1,500 km in width. The depth of the shelves also varies. It may be as shallow as 30 m in some areas while in some areas it is as deep as 600 m. The continental shelves are covered with variable thicknesses of sediments brought down by rivers, glaciers, wind, from the land and distributed by waves and currents. Massive sedimentary deposits received over along time by the continental shelves, become the source of fossil fuels.

Q. Where is the Siberian Shelf located?

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 8 The Siberian Shelf, one of the Arctic Ocean coastal shelves (such as the Milne Ice Shelf), is the largest continental shelf of the Earth, a part of the continental shelf of Russia. It extends from the continent of Eurasia in the general area of North Siberia (hence the name) into the Arctic Ocean.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 9

Direction: Read the case Study given below and answer an three of the questions that follow.

The temperature-depth profile for the ocean water shows how the temperature decreases with the increasing depth. The profile shows a boundary region between the surface waters of the ocean and the deeper layers. The boundary usually begins around 100 - 400 m below the sea surface and extends several hundred of metres downward. This boundary region, from where there is a rapid decrease of temperature, is called the thermocline. About 90 per cent of the total volume of water is found below the thermocline in the deep ocean. In this zone, temperatures approach 0°C. The temperature structure of oceans over middle and low latitudes can be described as a three-layer system from surface to the bottom. The first layer represents the top layer of warm oceanic water and it is about 500 m thick with temperatures ranging between 20° and 25°C. This layer, within the tropical region, is present throughout the year but in mid latitudes it develops only during summer. The second layer called the thermocline layer lies below the first layer and is characterised by rapid decrease in temperature with increasing depth. The thermocline is 500-1,000 m thick. The third layer is very cold and extends upto the deep ocean floor. In the Arctic and Antarctic circles, the surface water temperatures are close to 0°C and so the temperature change with the depth is very slight. Here, only one layer of cold water exists, which extends from surface to deep ocean floor.

Q. The __________ profile for the ocean water shows how the temperature decreases with the increasing depth.

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 9 The temperature-depth profile for the ocean water shows how the temperature decreases with the increasing depth. The profile shows a boundary region between the surface waters of the ocean and the deeper layers.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 10

Direction: Read the case Study given below and answer an three of the questions that follow.

The temperature-depth profile for the ocean water shows how the temperature decreases with the increasing depth. The profile shows a boundary region between the surface waters of the ocean and the deeper layers. The boundary usually begins around 100 - 400 m below the sea surface and extends several hundred of metres downward. This boundary region, from where there is a rapid decrease of temperature, is called the thermocline. About 90 per cent of the total volume of water is found below the thermocline in the deep ocean. In this zone, temperatures approach 0°C. The temperature structure of oceans over middle and low latitudes can be described as a three-layer system from surface to the bottom. The first layer represents the top layer of warm oceanic water and it is about 500 m thick with temperatures ranging between 20° and 25°C. This layer, within the tropical region, is present throughout the year but in mid latitudes it develops only during summer. The second layer called the thermocline layer lies below the first layer and is characterised by rapid decrease in temperature with increasing depth. The thermocline is 500-1,000 m thick. The third layer is very cold and extends upto the deep ocean floor. In the Arctic and Antarctic circles, the surface water temperatures are close to 0°C and so the temperature change with the depth is very slight. Here, only one layer of cold water exists, which extends from surface to deep ocean floor.

Q. Which layer is characterised by rapid decrease in temperature with increasing depth?

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 10 In the thermocline, temperature decreases rapidly from the mixed upper layer of the ocean (called the epipelagic zone) to much colder deep water in the thermocline (mesopelagic zone).
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 11

Direction: Read the case Study given below and answer an three of the questions that follow.

The temperature-depth profile for the ocean water shows how the temperature decreases with the increasing depth. The profile shows a boundary region between the surface waters of the ocean and the deeper layers. The boundary usually begins around 100 - 400 m below the sea surface and extends several hundred of metres downward. This boundary region, from where there is a rapid decrease of temperature, is called the thermocline. About 90 per cent of the total volume of water is found below the thermocline in the deep ocean. In this zone, temperatures approach 0°C. The temperature structure of oceans over middle and low latitudes can be described as a three-layer system from surface to the bottom. The first layer represents the top layer of warm oceanic water and it is about 500 m thick with temperatures ranging between 20° and 25°C. This layer, within the tropical region, is present throughout the year but in mid latitudes it develops only during summer. The second layer called the thermocline layer lies below the first layer and is characterised by rapid decrease in temperature with increasing depth. The thermocline is 500-1,000 m thick. The third layer is very cold and extends upto the deep ocean floor. In the Arctic and Antarctic circles, the surface water temperatures are close to 0°C and so the temperature change with the depth is very slight. Here, only one layer of cold water exists, which extends from surface to deep ocean floor.

Q. What is the temperature structure in the first layer of the ocean water?

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 11 The first layer represents the top layer of warm oceanic water and it is about 500m thick with temperatures ranging between 20° and 25° C. This layer, within the tropical region, is present throughout the year but in mid-latitudes it develops only during summer.
Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 12

Direction: Read the case Study given below and answer an three of the questions that follow.

The temperature-depth profile for the ocean water shows how the temperature decreases with the increasing depth. The profile shows a boundary region between the surface waters of the ocean and the deeper layers. The boundary usually begins around 100 - 400 m below the sea surface and extends several hundred of metres downward. This boundary region, from where there is a rapid decrease of temperature, is called the thermocline. About 90 per cent of the total volume of water is found below the thermocline in the deep ocean. In this zone, temperatures approach 0°C. The temperature structure of oceans over middle and low latitudes can be described as a three-layer system from surface to the bottom. The first layer represents the top layer of warm oceanic water and it is about 500 m thick with temperatures ranging between 20° and 25°C. This layer, within the tropical region, is present throughout the year but in mid latitudes it develops only during summer. The second layer called the thermocline layer lies below the first layer and is characterised by rapid decrease in temperature with increasing depth. The thermocline is 500-1,000 m thick. The third layer is very cold and extends upto the deep ocean floor. In the Arctic and Antarctic circles, the surface water temperatures are close to 0°C and so the temperature change with the depth is very slight. Here, only one layer of cold water exists, which extends from surface to deep ocean floor.

Q. What is the water temperature in Arctic and Antarctic circles?

Detailed Solution for Test: Water (Oceans)- Case Based Type Questions - Question 12
  • Close to 0°C is the water temperature in Arctic and Antarctic circles.

  • The temperature of the surface water of the Arctic Ocean is fairly constant at approximately −1.8 °C (28.8 °F), near the freezing point of seawater.

  • The coldest temperature recorded in Antarctica was -89.6°C at Vostok station in 1983.

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