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Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - UPSC MCQ


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18 Questions MCQ Test Lucent for GK - Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions

Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions for UPSC 2024 is part of Lucent for GK preparation. The Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions questions and answers have been prepared according to the UPSC exam syllabus.The Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions MCQs are made for UPSC 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions below.
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Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 1

Direction: For each part choose from the following:

Assertion (A): Canals were initially built to transport coal to cities.

Reason (R): The bulk and weight of coal made its transport by road much slower and more expensive than by barges on canals.

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 1
Canals were initially built to transport coal to cities. This was because the bulk and weight of coal made its transport by road much slower and more expensive than by barges on canals. The demand for coal, as industrial energy and for heating and lighting homes in cities, grew constantly.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 2

Direction: For each part choose from the following:

Assertion (A): Children were often employed in textile factories.

Reason(R): Coal mines were safe places to work in.

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 2
"Child labour" generally refers to the practice of employing children who work to produce a good or service which can be sold for money in the marketplace regardless of whether or not they are paid for their work. Child labour was a widespread means of providing mass labour at little expense to employers during the Industrial Revolution. The youngest children in the textile factories were usually employed as scavengers and pieces. Piecers had to lean over the spinning-machine to repair the broken threads.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 3

Direction: For each part choose from the following:

Assertion (A): There was a large-scale increase in population in European cities in the 1800s.

Reason(R): Deaths were primarily caused by epidemics of disease that sprang from the pollution of water, like cholera and typhoid, or of the air like tuberculosis.

Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 4

Direction: Find out from the following pairs which one is correctly matched:

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 4
Flying shuttle, Machine that represented an important step toward automatic weaving. It was invented by John Kay in 1733. In previous looms, the shuttle was thrown, or passed, through the threads by hand, and wide fabrics required two weavers seated side by side passing the shuttle between them.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 5

Direction: Find out from the following pairs which one is correctly matched:

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 5
The Mines and Collieries Bill, which was supported by Anthony Ashley-Cooper, was hastily passed by Parliament in 1842. The Act prohibited all underground work for women and girls, and for boys under 10. Further legislation in 1850 addressed the frequency of accidents in mines.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 6

Direction: Find out from the following pairs which one is correctly matched:

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 6
Samuel F.B. Morse developed an electric telegraph (1832–35) and then invented, with his friend Alfred Vail, the Morse Code (1838). The latter is a system for representing letters of the alphabet, numerals, and punctuation marks by arranging dots, dashes, and spaces.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 7

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The invention of the railway took the entire process of industrialisation to a second stage in 1801. Richard Trevithick (1771-1833) had devised an engine called the Puffing Devil that pulled trucks around the mine where he worked in Cornwall. In 1814 the railway engineer George Stephenson (1781 - 1848) constructed a locomotive called “The Blucher” that could pull a weight of 30 tons up-to a Hill at 4 mph. The first railway line connected the cities of Stockton and Darlington in 1825, a distance of 9 miles that was completed in two hours at a speed-up of up to 24 kph (15 mph), and the next railway line connected Liverpool and Manchester in 1830. Within 20 years, speeds of 30 to 50 miles an hour were usual.

In 1830, the use of canals revealed several problems. The congestion of vessels made movements slow on certain stages of canals; and Frost, flood or draught limited the time of their use. The Railways now appeared as it was convenient alternative. About 6,000 miles of railway was opened in Britain between 1830 and 1850, most of it into short bursts.

Q. Which incident took the entire process of industrialization to a second stage?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 7
Railways emerged as a new means of transportation available throughout the year. It was both cheap and fast, to carry passengers and goods. In the second stage, the invention of the railways took the entire process of industrialisation. In 1801, Richard Trevithick had devised an engine called the 'Puffing Devil'.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 8

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The invention of railway took the entire process of industrialisation to a second stage in 1801. Richard Trevithick (1771-1833) had devised and engine called the Puffing Devil that pulled trucks around the mine where he worked in Cornwall. In 1814 the railway engineer George Stephenson (1781 - 1848) constructed a locomotive called “The Blucher” that could pull a weight of 30 tons up-to a Hill at 4 mph. The first railway line connected the cities of Stockton and Darlington in 1825, a distance of 9 miles that was completed in two hours at a speed-up of up to 24 kph (15 mph), and the next railway line connected Liverpool and Manchester in 1830. Within 20 years, speeds of 30 to 50 miles an hour were usual.

In 1830, the use of canals revealed several problems. The congestion of vessels made movements slow on certain stages of canals; and Frost, flood or draught limited the time of their use. The Railways now appeared as it was convenient alternative. About 6,000 miles of railway was opened in Britain between 1830 and 1850, most of it into short bursts.

Q. What do you think, when did the first phase of the industrial revolution occur?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 8
The Industrial Revolution was a period of major industrialization and innovation during the late 1700s and early 1800s. The Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain and quickly spread throughout the world.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 9

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The invention of railway took the entire process of industrialisation to a second stage in 1801. Richard Trevithick (1771-1833) had devised and engine called the Puffing Devil that pulled trucks around the mine where he worked in Cornwall. In 1814 the railway engineer George Stephenson (1781 - 1848) constructed a locomotive called “The Blucher” that could pull a weight of 30 tons up-to a Hill at 4 mph. The first railway line connected the cities of Stockton and Darlington in 1825, a distance of 9 miles that was completed in two hours at a speed-up of up to 24 kph (15 mph), and the next railway line connected Liverpool and Manchester in 1830. Within 20 years, speeds of 30 to 50 miles an hour were usual.

In 1830, the use of canals revealed several problems. The congestion of vessels made movements slow on certain stages of canals; and Frost, flood or draught limited the time of their use. The Railways now appeared as it was convenient alternative. About 6,000 miles of railway was opened in Britain between 1830 and 1850, most of it into short bursts.

Q. What was the “Puffing Devil”?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 9
In 1801, Richard Trevithick (1771-1833) had devised an engine called the ‘Puffing Devil’ that pulled trucks around the mine where he worked in Cornwall.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 10

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The invention of railway took the entire process of industrialisation to a second stage in 1801. Richard Trevithick (1771-1833) had devised and engine called the Puffing Devil that pulled trucks around the mine where he worked in Cornwall. In 1814 the railway engineer George Stephenson (1781 - 1848) constructed a locomotive called “The Blucher” that could pull a weight of 30 tons up-to a Hill at 4 mph. The first railway line connected the cities of Stockton and Darlington in 1825, a distance of 9 miles that was completed in two hours at a speed-up of up to 24 kph (15 mph), and the next railway line connected Liverpool and Manchester in 1830. Within 20 years, speeds of 30 to 50 miles an hour were usual.

In 1830, the use of canals revealed several problems. The congestion of vessels made movements slow on certain stages of canals; and Frost, flood or draught limited the time of their use. The Railways now appeared as it was convenient alternative. About 6,000 miles of railway was opened in Britain between 1830 and 1850, most of it into short bursts.

Q. What problems did the use of canals reveal in the 1830s?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 10
In the 1830s, the use of canals revealed several problems. The congestion of vessels made movement slow on certain stretches of canals, and frost, flood or drought limited the time of their use. The railways now appeared as a convenient alternative. About 6,000 miles of railway was opened in Britain between 1830 and 1850, most of it in two short bursts. During the ‘little railway mania’ of 1833-37, 1400 miles of line was built, and during the bigger ‘mania’ of 1844-47, another 9,500 miles of line was sanctioned.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 11

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The Factory managers considered child labour to be important training for future factory work. The evidence from British factory records reveals that about half of the factory workers had started work when they were less than 10 years old and 28% when they were under 14. Women may well have gained increased financial Independence and self-esteem from their jobs but this was more than offset by the humiliating terms of work they endured, the children they lost at birth or in early childhood and the squalid urban slums that industrial work compelled them to live in.

Q. Why child labour is considered important for factory work.

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 11
Because children often helped produce the goods out of their homes, working in a factory to make those same goods was a simple change for many of these youths.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 12

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The Factory managers considered child labour to be important training for future factory work. The evidence from British factory records reveals that about half of the factory workers had started work when they were less than 10 years old and 28% when they were under 14. Women may well have gained increased financial Independence and self-esteem from their jobs but this was more than offset by the humiliating terms of work they endured, the children they lost at birth or in early childhood and the squalid urban slums that industrial work compelled them to live in.

Q. As per evidence from British factory records 28% of factory workers are:

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 12
The evidence from British factory records reveals that about half of the factory workers had started work when they were less than 10 years old and 28% when they were under 14.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 13

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The Factory managers considered child labour to be important training for future factory work. The evidence from British factory records reveals that about half of the factory workers had started work when they were less than 10 years old and 28% when they were under 14. Women may well have gained increased financial Independence and self-esteem from their jobs but this was more than offset by the humiliating terms of work they endured, the children they lost at birth or in early childhood and the squalid urban slums that industrial work compelled them to live in.

Q. According to the extracts, at what age, half of the factory workers had started working in factories.

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 13
In 1833 the Government passed a Factory Act to improve conditions for children working in factories. Young children were working very long hours in workplaces where conditions were often terrible. The basic act was as follows:
  • no child workers under nine years of age

  • employers must have an age certificate for their child workers

  • children of 9-13 years to work no more than nine hours a day

  • children of 13-18 years to work no more than 12 hours a day

  • children are not to work at night

  • two hours schooling each day for children

  • four factory inspectors appointed to enforce the law

Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 14

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

The Factory managers considered child labour to be important training for future factory work. The evidence from British factory records reveals that about half of the factory workers had started work when they were less than 10 years old and 28% when they were under 14. Women may well have gained increased financial Independence and self-esteem from their jobs but this was more than offset by the humiliating terms of work they endured, the children they lost at birth or in early childhood and the squalid urban slums that industrial work compelled them to live in.

Q. What do you think, why did industrialists in Britain prefer to employ women and children?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 14
Children of the rural poor had always worked at home or in farm. But they worked under the watchful eyes of parents or relatives. Similarly, rural women were actively involved in farm work. But working in factories was different. Working hours became longer. Same kind of work brought monotony. Strict discipline and sharp punishment made the life difficult. Industrialists preferred to employ women and children because of lower wages and less chances of worker’s agitation. Machinery, like the cotton spinning jenny was designed to be used by child workers with their small build and nimble fingers. Inhuman working conditions often resulted in accidents at workplaces.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 15

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

A survey in 1842 revealed that the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social group in cities. It was 15 years in Birmingham, 17 in Manchester, 21 in Derby. More people died and died at a young age in the new industrial cities than in villages they had come from. Half the children failed to survive beyond the age of 5. The increase in the population of cities was because of immigrants, rather than by an increase in the number of children born to families who already lived there.

Deaths were primarily caused by epidemics of disease that sprang from the pollution of water, like cholera and typhoid, or of the Year air like tuberculosis. More than 31000 people died from an outbreak of cholera in 1832. Until late in the 19th Century, Municipal authorities were negligent in attending to these dangerous conditions of life and the medical knowledge to understand and cure these diseases was unknown.

Q. What was the main reason for the increase in population of cities?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 15
Migration and natural increase, as important factors in urban population growth are closely interlinked. Studies have shown that the relatively young age of migrants to cities generally results in greater contribution to natural population increase because migrants have fewer deaths and more births (Stolnitz, 1984). There is also an apparent time lag between migration to cities and internalization of fertility reducing behaviour. Recent migrants to cities tend to continue having high fertility rates for decades before their values and fertility behaviour change, particularly when access to family planning information and services is limited.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 16

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

A survey in 1842 revealed that the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social group in cities. It was 15 years in Birmingham, 17 in Manchester, 21 in Derby. More people died and died at a young age in the new industrial cities than in villages they had come from. Half the children failed to survive beyond the age of 5. The increase in the population of cities was because of immigrants, rather than by an increase in the number of children born to families who already lived there.

Deaths were primarily caused by epidemics of disease that sprang from the pollution of water, like cholera and typhoid, or of the Year air like tuberculosis. More than 31000 people died from an outbreak of cholera in 1832. Until late in the 19th Century, Municipal authorities were negligent in attending to these dangerous conditions of life and the medical knowledge to understand and cure these diseases was unknown.

Q. What do you think according to this extract, which authority was not able to attend these dangerous conditions?

Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 17

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

A survey in 1842 revealed that the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social group in cities. It was 15 years in Birmingham, 17 in Manchester, 21 in Derby. More people died and died at a young age in the new industrial cities than in villages they had come from. Half the children failed to survive beyond the age of 5. The increase in the population of cities was because of immigrants, rather than by an increase in the number of children born to families who already lived there.

Deaths were primarily caused by epidemics of disease that sprang from the pollution of water, like cholera and typhoid, or of the Year air like tuberculosis. More than 31000 people died from an outbreak of cholera in 1832. Until late in the 19th Century, Municipal authorities were negligent in attending to these dangerous conditions of life and the medical knowledge to understand and cure these diseases was unknown.

What did the survey of 1842 reveal? Choose the correct option?

Assertion (A) : the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social group in cities

Reason (R) : deaths were caused by epidemic of diseases like cholera and Typhoid

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 17
A survey in 1842 revealed that the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social groups in cities. Compared to villages, more people died at a younger age in the new industrial cities. Fifty per cent of children failed to survive beyond the age of five. Population of a city increased because of immigrants. Epidemics, like cholera, typhoid and tuberculosis killed many people. Until late in the nineteenth century, municipal authorities were negligent in tackling these epidemics. Moreover, medical knowledge to understand and cure these diseases was unknown.
Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 18

Direction: Read the following extract carefully and answer ANY THREE of the following questions by choosing the correct option:

A survey in 1842 revealed that the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social group in cities. It was 15 years in Birmingham, 17 in Manchester, 21 in Derby. More people died and died at a young age in the new industrial cities than in villages they had come from. Half the children failed to survive beyond the age of 5. The increase in the population of cities was because of immigrants, rather than by an increase in the number of children born to families who already lived there.

Deaths were primarily caused by epidemics of disease that sprang from the pollution of water, like cholera and typhoid, or of the Year air like tuberculosis. More than 31000 people died from an outbreak of cholera in 1832. Until late in the 19th Century, Municipal authorities were negligent in attending to these dangerous conditions of life and the medical knowledge to understand and cure these diseases was unknown.

Q. What was the major factor that revealed in the survey in 1842?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Industrial Revolution- Assertion & Source Based Type Questions - Question 18
A survey in 1842 revealed that the average lifespan of workers was lower than that of any other social groups in cities. Compared to villages, more people died at a younger age in the new industrial cities. Fifty per cent of children failed to survive beyond the age of five.
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