Class 10 Exam  >  Class 10 Tests  >  Social Studies (SST) Class 10  >  Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Class 10 MCQ

Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Class 10 MCQ


Test Description

15 Questions MCQ Test Social Studies (SST) Class 10 - Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2

Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 for Class 10 2024 is part of Social Studies (SST) Class 10 preparation. The Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 10 exam syllabus.The Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 MCQs are made for Class 10 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 below.
Solutions of Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 questions in English are available as part of our Social Studies (SST) Class 10 for Class 10 & Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 solutions in Hindi for Social Studies (SST) Class 10 course. Download more important topics, notes, lectures and mock test series for Class 10 Exam by signing up for free. Attempt Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 | 15 questions in 15 minutes | Mock test for Class 10 preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study Social Studies (SST) Class 10 for Class 10 Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
1 Crore+ students have signed up on EduRev. Have you? Download the App
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 1

Who was a ‘Jobber’?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 1
Who was a 'Jobber'?
A jobber refers to a specific role or occupation in various industries. In the context of the given options, a jobber can be described as a trusted worker. Here is a detailed explanation of the term:
Definition:
A jobber is a term commonly used to describe an individual who is employed or contracted to perform specific tasks or services for a company or organization. This term is often associated with various industries, including manufacturing, construction, and services.
Explanation:
The term 'jobber' is derived from the word 'job,' which refers to a specific assignment or task. In this context, a jobber can be considered as a trusted worker who is responsible for completing assigned tasks efficiently and effectively.
Key Points:
- A jobber is a trusted worker employed or contracted by a company or organization.
- Jobbers are responsible for completing specific tasks or assignments.
- They are often skilled workers who possess expertise in their respective fields.
- Jobbers may work independently or as part of a team, depending on the nature of the job.
- They are expected to deliver quality work within the given timeframe.
- Jobbers may be hired on a temporary or permanent basis, depending on the requirements of the company.
Example:
- In the manufacturing industry, a jobber may be responsible for operating specialized machinery or equipment to produce goods.
- In the construction industry, a jobber may be assigned to complete specific tasks such as carpentry, plumbing, or electrical work.
- In the services industry, a jobber may provide services such as cleaning, gardening, or maintenance.
Overall, a jobber is a trusted worker who plays a crucial role in completing assigned tasks or services for a company or organization. They contribute to the smooth functioning and success of various industries by delivering quality work and expertise in their respective fields.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 2

Who among the following was not associated with the steam engine?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 2
Answer:
Introduction:
The steam engine is a significant invention that played a crucial role in the Industrial Revolution. Many notable individuals contributed to the development and improvement of the steam engine. In this question, we need to identify the person who was not associated with the steam engine.

The correct answer is James Hargreaves. He was not associated with the steam engine. The individuals associated with the steam engine are as follows:
- James Watt: James Watt is widely recognized as one of the key figures in the development of the steam engine. He made significant improvements to the Newcomen steam engine, making it more efficient and practical.
- Newcomen: Thomas Newcomen was an English inventor and engineer. He is credited with inventing the first practical steam engine, known as the Newcomen engine, which was widely used in the early 18th century.
- Matthew Boulton: Matthew Boulton was a business partner of James Watt. Together, they formed the partnership of Boulton & Watt and played a crucial role in the commercialization and widespread adoption of the steam engine.
- James Hargreaves: James Hargreaves, on the other hand, was not associated with the steam engine. He is known for inventing the spinning jenny, a device that revolutionized the textile industry.
In conclusion, among the given options, James Hargreaves was not associated with the steam engine.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 3

From which of the following trade did the early entrepreneurs make a fortune?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 3
Answer:
The early entrepreneurs made a fortune from the China trade. Here is a detailed explanation:
1. Introduction:
The early entrepreneurs were involved in various trades, but one trade that stood out was the China trade.
2. Textile trade:
Although the textile trade was a profitable industry during that time, it was not the trade from which the early entrepreneurs made a fortune. So option A is incorrect.
3. Trade in tea:
The trade in tea was indeed lucrative, especially during the British colonization era. However, it was not the sole trade that brought fortune to the early entrepreneurs. So option C is incorrect.
4. Industries:
While the growth of industries played a significant role in the economic development of nations, it is a broad category and does not specifically refer to a trade that made early entrepreneurs wealthy. So option D is incorrect.
5. China trade:
The China trade refers to the trade between Western countries, particularly Britain and the United States, and China during the 18th and 19th centuries. This trade involved the exchange of goods like tea, porcelain, silk, spices, and opium. The demand for Chinese goods in the Western market was high, and entrepreneurs who were involved in this trade amassed great wealth. They established trading companies, built relationships with Chinese merchants, and profited from the import and export of goods. Merchants like the East India Company and individuals like Robert Morris and John Jacob Astor made fortunes through the China trade.
Conclusion:
Therefore, the correct answer is b. China trade. This trade presented early entrepreneurs with immense opportunities for wealth accumulation through the import and export of goods between China and Western countries.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 4

Why were the weavers tied with the company traders?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 4
The weavers were tied with the company traders because:
- They were under loans: The weavers were tied with the company traders because they were under loans. This means that they had borrowed money from the company traders and were obligated to work for them until the loan was repaid. The weavers were essentially bound to the company traders by the debt they owed.
- They had no other place to work: Another reason why the weavers were tied with the company traders is that they had no other place to work. The weavers may have been limited in their options for employment, and the company traders provided them with a source of income and stability.
- They had less equipment: Additionally, the weavers may have been tied with the company traders because they had less equipment. This could mean that they lacked the necessary tools and resources to work independently, and therefore relied on the company traders for supplies and support.
- None of these: It is important to note that none of these reasons may apply and the weavers may have been tied with the company traders for a different reason altogether. Without more information, it is difficult to determine the exact circumstances that led to this situation.
In conclusion, the weavers were tied with the company traders due to their loans, lack of alternative employment options, or limited equipment. However, it is also possible that other factors contributed to their association with the company traders.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 5

Who was a jobber?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 5
Who was a jobber?
A jobber refers to a person who was employed in a specific role or position. To determine the correct answer, let's analyze each option:
A: A person employed by the industrialist to get new recruits
- This option refers to a recruiter, not a jobber. A jobber is someone who performs a specific task or role within an organization.
B: A person employed by the farmers to sell their products
- This option describes a salesperson or a marketer, not a jobber. A jobber is typically involved in the execution of a particular job or task.
C: A person, who was doing the most important job in a factory
- This option does not accurately define a jobber. The importance of a job does not determine whether someone is a jobber or not.
D: A paid servant of the East India Company
- This option does not accurately describe a jobber. The role of a servant does not align with the definition of a jobber.
Therefore, the correct answer is A: A person employed by the industrialist to get new recruits.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 6

Which of the following was a European managing agency?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 6
European Managing Agency:
The European managing agency among the given options is Andrew Yule.
Explanation:
Here is a detailed explanation of the given options and why Andrew Yule is the correct answer:
- Tata Iron and Steel Company: Tata Iron and Steel Company (TISCO) is an Indian company, not a European managing agency. It was established by Jamsetji Tata in 1907 and is now known as Tata Steel.
- Andrew Yule: Andrew Yule & Co. Ltd. is a British company that operated as a European managing agency. It was founded in 1863 and was involved in various industries such as tea, engineering, electrical, and more. It played a significant role in managing and promoting European investments in India.
- Elgin Mill: Elgin Mill is not a European managing agency, but rather a textile mill located in Elgin, Scotland. It does not fit the criteria of being a European managing agency.
- Birla Industries: Birla Industries is an Indian conglomerate and not a European managing agency. It is part of the Birla Group, which is a prominent Indian business conglomerate.
In conclusion, out of the given options, Andrew Yule is the European managing agency.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 7

18th Century India witnessed the decline of port town?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 7
Decline of Port Towns in 18th Century India

The decline of port towns in 18th Century India was a significant event that had various implications on the economic and political landscape of the country. Among the port towns that witnessed decline during this period were:



  • Surat: Surat, located in present-day Gujarat, was once a prominent port town and a major center of trade and commerce. However, by the 18th century, it started to decline due to various factors such as the shift in trade routes, competition from other ports, and political instability in the region.


  • Bombay: Bombay, now known as Mumbai, also experienced a decline during the 18th century. This decline can be attributed to the rise of other ports like Calcutta and Madras, which became more attractive for trade due to their strategic locations and better infrastructure.


  • Calcutta: Calcutta, present-day Kolkata, emerged as a major port town during the 18th century. It became a center of British colonial power and witnessed significant growth in trade and commerce. This growth, coupled with the decline of other port towns, led to Calcutta's rise as a prominent economic and political hub.


  • Madras: Madras, now known as Chennai, also experienced growth during the 18th century. It became an important center for trade and administration under the British East India Company. The growth of Madras, along with the decline of other port towns, contributed to the shifting dynamics of trade and power in India.


In conclusion, the decline of port towns during the 18th century in India had significant implications for the country's economy and politics. Surat, Bombay, Calcutta, and Madras were among the port towns that witnessed changes in their fortunes during this period.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 8

Which one of the following was the job of Gomastha?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 8
Job of Gomastha:
The job of a Gomastha included the following responsibilities:
Supervising Weavers:
- The Gomastha was responsible for overseeing the work of the weavers.
- They would ensure that the weavers followed the instructions correctly and produced high-quality cloth.
- The Gomastha would monitor the weaving process and provide guidance or assistance when needed.
Collecting Supplies:
- Gomasthas were responsible for collecting the necessary supplies for the weavers.
- This included raw materials such as yarn or thread, as well as any other materials required for the weaving process.
- They would ensure that the weavers had a sufficient supply of materials to carry out their work.
Examining the Quality of the Cloth:
- Gomasthas would inspect the finished cloth to ensure that it met the required quality standards.
- They would carefully examine the texture, color, and overall appearance of the cloth to identify any defects or inconsistencies.
- If any issues were found, the Gomastha would take appropriate measures to rectify them and ensure that the final product met the desired quality criteria.
All of the Above:
- Based on the options provided (A, B, C, D), the correct answer is D, which states that the job of Gomastha included supervising weavers, collecting supplies, and examining the quality of the cloth.
- Therefore, the Gomastha had a multifaceted role that encompassed various aspects of the weaving process to ensure the production of high-quality cloth.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 9

Why did the weavers suffer from a problem of raw cotton?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 9

The weavers suffer from a problem of raw cotton because raw cotton exports increased.

Production of Cotton:

  • Cotton is produced by many countries in the world and many varieties of cotton are cultivated
  • In the rule of the Mughal Empire, the production of cotton increased because Mughals started reforms for the cultivation of cotton
  • The production of cotton is increased in Egypt in the 19th-century
  • The cotton is cultivated in large amounts during moderate rainfall and the presence of sunlight
  • The cotton is harvested by the use of machines in various countries
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 10

The paid servants of the East India Company was known as

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 10
Paid Servants of the East India Company

  • Gomastha: The paid servants of the East India Company were known as Gomasthas. They were appointed by the Company to oversee and manage the various aspects of trade, production, and administration in the regions under Company control.

  • Roles and Responsibilities: The Gomasthas were responsible for the following tasks:


    • Supervising the cultivation of indigo, opium, and other cash crops.

    • Collecting revenue and taxes from the local population.

    • Enforcing the terms of the Company's contracts with Indian weavers and artisans.

    • Monitoring and controlling the activities of local traders and merchants.

    • Reporting to the Company officials about the economic and political situation in their assigned regions.


  • Authority and Controversies: The Gomasthas held considerable power and authority over the local population. However, their role was often controversial:


    • They were accused of corruption, extortion, and abuse of power.

    • They were notorious for their harsh treatment of Indian workers and artisans.

    • The Gomasthas played a significant role in the agrarian distress and decline of the Indian textile industry during the colonial period.


  • Impact on Indian Society: The presence of Gomasthas and the Company's control over trade and production had a profound impact on Indian society:


    • It led to the exploitation and impoverishment of Indian farmers, weavers, and artisans.

    • It disrupted traditional economic and social structures.

    • It contributed to the growth of a cash-based economy and the decline of indigenous industries.



Overall, the Gomasthas were significant figures in the colonial administration of the East India Company. While they played a crucial role in furthering the Company's economic interests, their actions also had negative consequences for the Indian population and local industries.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 11

Find the incorrect option :
Proto industrial system was.........

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 11

The incorrect option in this case is C: The system under which goods were produced in factories.
Explanation:
Proto industrial system refers to the period of industrialization before the introduction of factories. It was characterized by decentralized production that took place in rural areas, rather than in factories. Here, goods were produced by individuals or families in their homes or small workshops.
Key points:
- Proto industrial system was a part of a network of commercial exchanges where goods were produced in rural areas.
- The system was controlled by merchants who provided raw materials and distributed the finished products.
- It was a system that supplemented the income of people in the countryside, as they could engage in manufacturing alongside their agricultural activities.
- Factories were not yet a part of the proto industrial system as it was a pre-factory stage of industrialization.
Therefore, option C is incorrect as it incorrectly suggests that the proto industrial system involved the production of goods in factories.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 12

In Victorian Britain, the upper classes-aristocratic class and bourgeoisie preferred handmade goods because:

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 12
Reasons why the upper classes in Victorian Britain preferred handmade goods:
1. Symbol of refinement and class:
- Handmade goods were associated with craftsmanship and attention to detail.
- The upper classes believed that owning handmade items demonstrated their refined taste and social status.
- These goods were seen as a symbol of exclusivity and sophistication.
2. Imported materials:
- Handmade goods were often made from imported materials, which added to their allure and desirability.
- The upper classes valued the rarity and uniqueness of these materials, further enhancing the prestige of the goods.
3. Better finished products:
- Handmade goods were meticulously crafted, resulting in superior quality and finish.
- The upper classes appreciated the fine craftsmanship and superior attention to detail that went into producing these items.
- They believed that machine-made goods lacked the same level of precision and refinement.
4. Affordability and exclusivity:
- Handmade goods were typically more expensive than mass-produced items.
- The upper classes, with their wealth and disposable income, could afford the luxury of purchasing these expensive goods.
- Owning handmade items set them apart from the lower classes, who could not afford such luxury.
Overall, the upper classes in Victorian Britain preferred handmade goods because they symbolized refinement, class, and exclusivity. The association with imported materials, superior craftsmanship, and the ability to afford expensive items further reinforced their preference for handmade goods.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 13

Who devised the Spinning Jenny?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 13
Answer:
The Spinning Jenny was devised by James Hargreaves.
Explanation:
The Spinning Jenny was one of the most important inventions during the Industrial Revolution. It revolutionized the textile industry and greatly increased the productivity of spinning thread. Here is a detailed explanation of the invention and its inventor:
1. Invention of the Spinning Jenny:
- The Spinning Jenny was a multi-spindle spinning frame that allowed multiple threads to be spun at the same time.
- It was invented in the 1760s and played a significant role in the mechanization of textile production.
- The machine was able to spin several threads at once, which greatly increased productivity and efficiency.
2. Inventor - James Hargreaves:
- James Hargreaves, a weaver and carpenter from Lancashire, England, is credited with inventing the Spinning Jenny.
- He developed the machine to address the limitations of the spinning process, which was traditionally done by hand.
- The name "Jenny" is believed to be a combination of Hargreaves' daughter's name and the term "spinning frame."
3. Impact and Significance:
- The Spinning Jenny had a profound impact on the textile industry.
- It enabled the production of large quantities of thread, leading to the growth of the cotton industry and the development of the factory system.
- The invention marked a crucial step towards the industrialization of textile production and paved the way for further advancements in the field.
In conclusion, the Spinning Jenny was devised by James Hargreaves, an inventor from Lancashire, England. His invention revolutionized the textile industry and played a significant role in the Industrial Revolution.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 14

What do you mean by the orient? Which of the following meaning is correct?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 14
Definition of the Orient
The term "Orient" refers to the countries or regions located to the east of a specific point of reference. In this case, the correct meaning is option B: "The countries to the east of the Mediterranean sea."
Explanation:
The Orient is a concept that has been historically used to describe the eastern part of the world in relation to a particular location or perspective. Here is a detailed explanation of each option and why option B is the correct answer:
1. The countries to the west of the Indian Ocean: This option refers to countries like India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and parts of Africa. While it is a valid geographical region, it does not accurately represent the definition of the Orient.
2. The countries to the east of the Mediterranean sea: This option accurately describes the Orient. The Mediterranean sea serves as the point of reference, and the countries located to the east of it, such as Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Iran, and various others, are considered part of the Orient.
3. The countries to the west of the Pacific Ocean: This option refers to countries like the United States, Canada, Mexico, and parts of South America. While it is a valid geographical region, it does not accurately represent the definition of the Orient.
4. The countries east of the Red Sea: This option refers to countries like Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and Eritrea. While it is a valid geographical region, it does not accurately represent the definition of the Orient.
In summary, the correct answer is option B: "The countries to the east of the Mediterranean sea." This definition aligns with the historical usage of the term "Orient" to refer to the eastern part of the world in relation to the Mediterranean sea.
Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 15

Which of the following picture was on the cover page of the music book by E.T. Paul?

Detailed Solution for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 - Question 15
Question: Which of the following picture was on the cover page of the music book by E.T. Paul?

To determine the picture on the cover page of the music book by E.T. Paul, we need to analyze the given options and choose the correct one.
Options:
A: Dawn of the century
B: Dawn of the industrial age
C: Dawn of the agricultural age
D: Dawn of the 21st century
Analysis:
To find the answer, we can eliminate the options that do not match the description of the book or the author's name.
- Option A: Dawn of the century - This option seems to be the most relevant as it refers to a time period, which could be associated with music.
- Option B: Dawn of the industrial age - This option does not directly relate to music or the author's name.
- Option C: Dawn of the agricultural age - This option does not directly relate to music or the author's name.
- Option D: Dawn of the 21st century - This option refers to a specific time period, but it does not directly relate to music or the author's name.
Conclusion:
Based on the analysis, it can be concluded that the picture on the cover page of the music book by E.T. Paul is most likely "Dawn of the century" (Option A).
78 videos|503 docs|131 tests
Information about Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 Page
In this test you can find the Exam questions for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2 solved & explained in the simplest way possible. Besides giving Questions and answers for Test: The Age of Industrialisation - 2, EduRev gives you an ample number of Online tests for practice

Up next

78 videos|503 docs|131 tests
Download as PDF

Up next

Download the FREE EduRev App
Track your progress, build streaks, highlight & save important lessons and more!