Class 9  >  English Class 9  >  Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 Download as PDF

Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1


Test Description

10 Questions MCQ Test English Class 9 | Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1

Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 for Class 9 2022 is part of English Class 9 preparation. The Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 questions and answers have been prepared according to the Class 9 exam syllabus.The Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 MCQs are made for Class 9 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 below.
Solutions of Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 questions in English are available as part of our English Class 9 for Class 9 & Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 solutions in Hindi for English Class 9 course. Download more important topics, notes, lectures and mock test series for Class 9 Exam by signing up for free. Attempt Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 | 10 questions in 20 minutes | Mock test for Class 9 preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study English Class 9 for Class 9 Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
1 Crore+ students have signed up on EduRev. Have you?
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 1

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

One day when I was in the fifth standard at the Rameshwaram Elementary School, a new teacher came to our class. I used to wear a cap which marked me as a Muslim, and I always sat in the front row next to Ramanadha Shastri, who wore the sacred thread. The new teacher could not stomach a Hindu priest’s son sitting with a Muslim boy. In accordance with our social ranking as the new teacher saw it, I was asked to go and sit on the back bench. I felt very sad, and so did Ramanadha Shastri. He looked utterly downcast as I shifted to my seat in the last row. The image of him weeping when I shifted to the last row left a lasting impression on me.

Q. What was writer wearing?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 1 Writer wearing a Muslim Cap.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 2

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

One day when I was in the fifth standard at the Rameshwaram Elementary School, a new teacher came to our class. I used to wear a cap which marked me as a Muslim, and I always sat in the front row next to Ramanadha Shastri, who wore the sacred thread. The new teacher could not stomach a Hindu priest’s son sitting with a Muslim boy. In accordance with our social ranking as the new teacher saw it, I was asked to go and sit on the back bench. I felt very sad, and so did Ramanadha Shastri. He looked utterly downcast as I shifted to my seat in the last row. The image of him weeping when I shifted to the last row left a lasting impression on me.

Q. Why did the teacher separate Kalam from his friend?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 2 He tried to separate the Hindu Brahman boy, Ramanadha Sastry and Abdul Kalam, who was a Muslim. A new teacher at the Rameswaram Elementary School could not tolerate that Kalam, a Muslim, sat with Ramanadha Sastry, a Hindu wearing the sacred thread. This was contrary to the teacher's notion of social ranking.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 3

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

One day when I was in the fifth standard at the Rameshwaram Elementary School, a new teacher came to our class. I used to wear a cap which marked me as a Muslim, and I always sat in the front row next to Ramanadha Shastri, who wore the sacred thread. The new teacher could not stomach a Hindu priest’s son sitting with a Muslim boy. In accordance with our social ranking as the new teacher saw it, I was asked to go and sit on the back bench. I felt very sad, and so did Ramanadha Shastri. He looked utterly downcast as I shifted to my seat in the last row. The image of him weeping when I shifted to the last row left a lasting impression on me.

Q. Why did Kalam feel sad when he was in 5th standard in an elementary school?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 3 When Kalam was in the fifth standard in an elementary school, he used to sit with one of his best friend- Ramanadha Sastri. Ramanadha Sastri was the son of the high priest of the temple. Hence, Ramanadha Sastry was an upper caste Brahman boy. ... This separation from his best friend made Kalam very upset.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 4

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

One day when I was in the fifth standard at the Rameshwaram Elementary School, a new teacher came to our class. I used to wear a cap which marked me as a Muslim, and I always sat in the front row next to Ramanadha Shastri, who wore the sacred thread. The new teacher could not stomach a Hindu priest’s son sitting with a Muslim boy. In accordance with our social ranking as the new teacher saw it, I was asked to go and sit on the back bench. I felt very sad, and so did Ramanadha Shastri. He looked utterly downcast as I shifted to my seat in the last row. The image of him weeping when I shifted to the last row left a lasting impression on me.

Q. In which class was the writer studying at that time?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 4 The writer studying at that time in fifth standard.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 5

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

One day when I was in the fifth standard at the Rameshwaram Elementary School, a new teacher came to our class. I used to wear a cap which marked me as a Muslim, and I always sat in the front row next to Ramanadha Shastri, who wore the sacred thread. The new teacher could not stomach a Hindu priest’s son sitting with a Muslim boy. In accordance with our social ranking as the new teacher saw it, I was asked to go and sit on the back bench. I felt very sad, and so did Ramanadha Shastri. He looked utterly downcast as I shifted to my seat in the last row. The image of him weeping when I shifted to the last row left a lasting impression on me.

Q. What did the teacher ask writer to do?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 5 The teacher believed in the prevalent social ranking. Abdul Kalam and Ramanadha Sastry, both, felt very sad. Ramanadha Sastry was weeping when Kalam was asked to sit on the last bench. The new teachers action was not appropriate at all, because his behaviour spreads the poison of social inequality and communal intolerance in the minds of innocent children.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 6

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

The Second World War broke out in 1939, when I was eight years old. For reasons I have never been able to understand, a sudden demand for tamarind seeds erupted in the market. I used to collect the seeds and sell them to a provision shop on Mosque Street. A day’s collection would fetch me the princely sum of one aana. My brother-in-law Jallal-ud-din would tell me stories about the War which I would later attempt to trace in the headlines in Dinamani. Our area, being isolated, was completely unaffected by the War. But soon India was forced to join the Allied Forces and something like a state of emergency was declared. The first casualty came in the form of the suspension of the train halt at Rameshwaram station. The newspapers now had to be bundled and thrown out from the moving train on the Rameshwaram Road between Rameshwaram and Dhanushkodi. That forced my cousin Shamsh-ud-din, who distributed newspapers in Rameshwaram, to look for a helping hand to catch the bundles and, as if naturally, I filled the slot. Shamsh-ud-din helped me earn my first wages. Half a century later, I can still feel the surge of pride in earning my own money for the first time.

Q. How much money did Kalam earn after selling seeds?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 6 Abdul Kalam was eight years old when the Second World War broke out. Suddenly, there was a great demand for tamarind seeds. He would collect those seeds and sell them in the market. He got one anna (about six paise) for a day's collection.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 7

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

The Second World War broke out in 1939, when I was eight years old. For reasons I have never been able to understand, a sudden demand for tamarind seeds erupted in the market. I used to collect the seeds and sell them to a provision shop on Mosque Street. A day’s collection would fetch me the princely sum of one aana. My brother-in-law Jallal-ud-din would tell me stories about the War which I would later attempt to trace in the headlines in Dinamani. Our area, being isolated, was completely unaffected by the War. But soon India was forced to join the Allied Forces and something like a state of emergency was declared. The first casualty came in the form of the suspension of the train halt at Rameshwaram station. The newspapers now had to be bundled and thrown out from the moving train on the Rameshwaram Road between Rameshwaram and Dhanushkodi. That forced my cousin Shamsh-ud-din, who distributed newspapers in Rameshwaram, to look for a helping hand to catch the bundles and, as if naturally, I filled the slot. Shamsh-ud-din helped me earn my first wages. Half a century later, I can still feel the surge of pride in earning my own money for the first time.

Q. Why did Kalam collect tamarind seeds?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 7 These seeds were collected by Kalam as they were in great demand in the market during the Second World War and could be sold easily for a good sum of money.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 8

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

The Second World War broke out in 1939, when I was eight years old. For reasons I have never been able to understand, a sudden demand for tamarind seeds erupted in the market. I used to collect the seeds and sell them to a provision shop on Mosque Street. A day’s collection would fetch me the princely sum of one aana. My brother-in-law Jallal-ud-din would tell me stories about the War which I would later attempt to trace in the headlines in Dinamani. Our area, being isolated, was completely unaffected by the War. But soon India was forced to join the Allied Forces and something like a state of emergency was declared. The first casualty came in the form of the suspension of the train halt at Rameshwaram station. The newspapers now had to be bundled and thrown out from the moving train on the Rameshwaram Road between Rameshwaram and Dhanushkodi. That forced my cousin Shamsh-ud-din, who distributed newspapers in Rameshwaram, to look for a helping hand to catch the bundles and, as if naturally, I filled the slot. Shamsh-ud-din helped me earn my first wages. Half a century later, I can still feel the surge of pride in earning my own money for the first time.

Q. Which seeds did Kalam collect during the Second World War?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 8 Abdul Kalam had earned some money before that. When the Second World War broke out, there was a huge demand for tamarind seeds in the market. He used to collect the seeds and sell them at a provision shop on Mosque Street. This helped him earn one anna a day.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 9

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

The Second World War broke out in 1939, when I was eight years old. For reasons I have never been able to understand, a sudden demand for tamarind seeds erupted in the market. I used to collect the seeds and sell them to a provision shop on Mosque Street. A day’s collection would fetch me the princely sum of one aana. My brother-in-law Jallal-ud-din would tell me stories about the War which I would later attempt to trace in the headlines in Dinamani. Our area, being isolated, was completely unaffected by the War. But soon India was forced to join the Allied Forces and something like a state of emergency was declared. The first casualty came in the form of the suspension of the train halt at Rameshwaram station. The newspapers now had to be bundled and thrown out from the moving train on the Rameshwaram Road between Rameshwaram and Dhanushkodi. That forced my cousin Shamsh-ud-din, who distributed newspapers in Rameshwaram, to look for a helping hand to catch the bundles and, as if naturally, I filled the slot. Shamsh-ud-din helped me earn my first wages. Half a century later, I can still feel the surge of pride in earning my own money for the first time.

Q. Where did Kalam sell seeds?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 9 Abdul Kalam used to collect the tamarind seeds and used to sell them to provision shop on the Mosque street in Rameshwaram. A days collection would fetch him the princely one anna. Besides he would collect the bundle of newspaper and worked as a help for Samsuddin.
Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 10

Direction: Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow :

The Second World War broke out in 1939, when I was eight years old. For reasons I have never been able to understand, a sudden demand for tamarind seeds erupted in the market. I used to collect the seeds and sell them to a provision shop on Mosque Street. A day’s collection would fetch me the princely sum of one aana. My brother-in-law Jallal-ud-din would tell me stories about the War which I would later attempt to trace in the headlines in Dinamani. Our area, being isolated, was completely unaffected by the War. But soon India was forced to join the Allied Forces and something like a state of emergency was declared. The first casualty came in the form of the suspension of the train halt at Rameshwaram station. The newspapers now had to be bundled and thrown out from the moving train on the Rameshwaram Road between Rameshwaram and Dhanushkodi. That forced my cousin Shamsh-ud-din, who distributed newspapers in Rameshwaram, to look for a helping hand to catch the bundles and, as if naturally, I filled the slot. Shamsh-ud-din helped me earn my first wages. Half a century later, I can still feel the surge of pride in earning my own money for the first time.

Q. Who was Shamsh-ud-din?

Detailed Solution for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 - Question 10 Shamsh-ud-din was Abdul Kalam's cousin. He used to distribute newspapers in Rameswaram.
125 videos|603 docs|67 tests
Use Code STAYHOME200 and get INR 200 additional OFF
Use Coupon Code
Information about Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 Page
In this test you can find the Exam questions for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1 solved & explained in the simplest way possible. Besides giving Questions and answers for Test: My Childhood- Extract Based Type Questions- 1, EduRev gives you an ample number of Online tests for practice