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Languages: Mock Test - 6 - CUET MCQ


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40 Questions MCQ Test English Language Preparation for CUET - Languages: Mock Test - 6

Languages: Mock Test - 6 for CUET 2024 is part of English Language Preparation for CUET preparation. The Languages: Mock Test - 6 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CUET exam syllabus.The Languages: Mock Test - 6 MCQs are made for CUET 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Languages: Mock Test - 6 below.
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Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 1

British filmmaker Richard Curtis has written iconic popcultural classics like Mr. Bean, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill and Bridget Jones's Diary. His directorial debut, Love Actually, remains a rare film that at once parodies, celebrates, and reclaims, storytelling's most bastardised genre. But Curtis' most accomplished movie has everything and nothing to do with his reputation as the King of (Romantic) Comedy.

About Time (2013), starring Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson in a breakthrough role, cleverly weaponises its maker's stature. It counts on the fact that we anticipate an innovative (buzzword: time travel) but typically breezy love story. But the girl-boy arc fades into the background, and the film subverts our expectations by instead morphing into a deeply contemplative and winning tragedy about human nature. Curtis virtually uses his own career as a smokescreen to transform About Time into an affecting ode to closure and its elastic relationship with time. Early in the film, a retired James (Bill Nighy) informs his son Tim, a boy on the verge of big-city adulthood, that the men of the family possess the power to travel back in time. Naturally, at first, Tim abuses this cosmic gift like any red-blooded, teething male hero would - to find, and refine, his pursuit of love. He meets Mary, an American girl, and manipulates time in a manner that compels her to fall for him. You'd imagine any writer at this point would be tempted to use time travel as the pivot to continue navigating the cross-cultural politics of companionship. But Curtis refrains from old-school gimmickry. He designs the narrative device as a trigger that forces Tim's conflict to be conceived in the personal chasm that separates selfishness from selflessness: The selfishness of love from the selflessness of family.

Tim's story gets us thinking: do some of us subconsciously fail to sustain romantic relationships because we're unwilling to snap that umbilical cord? Do we postpone marriage - a family, children, onwardness -to preserve the fading remnants of our family? To keep our history accessible? The film's lyrical circularity exposes an uncomfortable truth about life - that romance is inherently an act of self-preservation. That loving someone, often, is a mechanism aimed at leaving something - and some times - behind. We choose to get consumed by life so that its origins are exhumed no more. For every child Tim has, the more irrevocably he drifts away from his own childhood. Every birth is inextricably linked to his rebirth. For each milestone he crosses as a life partner, the rules of time travel - a cinematic allegory for the texture of remembrance - force him to live rather than relive. Love is, after all, the emotional manifestation of the precise moment the future decides to break up with the past.

Q. 'Fortunately, he manages to be both selfless and selfish without compromising on the recipients of either trait.' What can be inferred from this line in the context of the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 1

Option (b) is the correct choice as the duality of Tim's character in being selfish and selfless helps him in retaining both his love and his family (friend).

This is the recipient of the two traits that Tim fortunately ends up receiving and thus he is not compromising on them, as mentioned in the marked sentence. Option (a) is incorrect as it is a partial repetition of the sentence. The other two options, i.e., (c) and (d) are presumptuous.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 2

British filmmaker Richard Curtis has written iconic popcultural classics like Mr. Bean, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill and Bridget Jones's Diary. His directorial debut, Love Actually, remains a rare film that at once parodies, celebrates, and reclaims, storytelling's most bastardised genre. But Curtis' most accomplished movie has everything and nothing to do with his reputation as the King of (Romantic) Comedy.

About Time (2013), starring Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson in a breakthrough role, cleverly weaponises its maker's stature. It counts on the fact that we anticipate an innovative (buzzword: time travel) but typically breezy love story. But the girl-boy arc fades into the background, and the film subverts our expectations by instead morphing into a deeply contemplative and winning tragedy about human nature. Curtis virtually uses his own career as a smokescreen to transform About Time into an affecting ode to closure and its elastic relationship with time. Early in the film, a retired James (Bill Nighy) informs his son Tim, a boy on the verge of big-city adulthood, that the men of the family possess the power to travel back in time. Naturally, at first, Tim abuses this cosmic gift like any red-blooded, teething male hero would - to find, and refine, his pursuit of love. He meets Mary, an American girl, and manipulates time in a manner that compels her to fall for him. You'd imagine any writer at this point would be tempted to use time travel as the pivot to continue navigating the cross-cultural politics of companionship. But Curtis refrains from old-school gimmickry. He designs the narrative device as a trigger that forces Tim's conflict to be conceived in the personal chasm that separates selfishness from selflessness: The selfishness of love from the selflessness of family.

Tim's story gets us thinking: do some of us subconsciously fail to sustain romantic relationships because we're unwilling to snap that umbilical cord? Do we postpone marriage - a family, children, onwardness -to preserve the fading remnants of our family? To keep our history accessible? The film's lyrical circularity exposes an uncomfortable truth about life - that romance is inherently an act of self-preservation. That loving someone, often, is a mechanism aimed at leaving something - and some times - behind. We choose to get consumed by life so that its origins are exhumed no more. For every child Tim has, the more irrevocably he drifts away from his own childhood. Every birth is inextricably linked to his rebirth. For each milestone he crosses as a life partner, the rules of time travel - a cinematic allegory for the texture of remembrance - force him to live rather than relive. Love is, after all, the emotional manifestation of the precise moment the future decides to break up with the past.

Q. As mentioned in the passage, the word "subverts" means

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 2

Option (a) is the correct answer as the word "subverts" means to secretly ruin or destroy something.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 3

British filmmaker Richard Curtis has written iconic popcultural classics like Mr. Bean, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill and Bridget Jones's Diary. His directorial debut, Love Actually, remains a rare film that at once parodies, celebrates, and reclaims, storytelling's most bastardised genre. But Curtis' most accomplished movie has everything and nothing to do with his reputation as the King of (Romantic) Comedy.

About Time (2013), starring Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson in a breakthrough role, cleverly weaponises its maker's stature. It counts on the fact that we anticipate an innovative (buzzword: time travel) but typically breezy love story. But the girl-boy arc fades into the background, and the film subverts our expectations by instead morphing into a deeply contemplative and winning tragedy about human nature. Curtis virtually uses his own career as a smokescreen to transform About Time into an affecting ode to closure and its elastic relationship with time. Early in the film, a retired James (Bill Nighy) informs his son Tim, a boy on the verge of big-city adulthood, that the men of the family possess the power to travel back in time. Naturally, at first, Tim abuses this cosmic gift like any red-blooded, teething male hero would - to find, and refine, his pursuit of love. He meets Mary, an American girl, and manipulates time in a manner that compels her to fall for him. You'd imagine any writer at this point would be tempted to use time travel as the pivot to continue navigating the cross-cultural politics of companionship. But Curtis refrains from old-school gimmickry. He designs the narrative device as a trigger that forces Tim's conflict to be conceived in the personal chasm that separates selfishness from selflessness: The selfishness of love from the selflessness of family.

Tim's story gets us thinking: do some of us subconsciously fail to sustain romantic relationships because we're unwilling to snap that umbilical cord? Do we postpone marriage - a family, children, onwardness -to preserve the fading remnants of our family? To keep our history accessible? The film's lyrical circularity exposes an uncomfortable truth about life - that romance is inherently an act of self-preservation. That loving someone, often, is a mechanism aimed at leaving something - and some times - behind. We choose to get consumed by life so that its origins are exhumed no more. For every child Tim has, the more irrevocably he drifts away from his own childhood. Every birth is inextricably linked to his rebirth. For each milestone he crosses as a life partner, the rules of time travel - a cinematic allegory for the texture of remembrance - force him to live rather than relive. Love is, after all, the emotional manifestation of the precise moment the future decides to break up with the past.

Q. 'Loving someone, often, is a mechanism aimed at leaving something'- Which of the following statements most appropriately justifies this point?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 3

Option (c) is the correct choice as the notion put forward in the last paragraph focuses on the importance of letting things go in order to actually love someone. The importance of living over the need to relive. All other options are incorrect as they omit the above-mentioned detail.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 4

British filmmaker Richard Curtis has written iconic popcultural classics like Mr. Bean, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill and Bridget Jones's Diary. His directorial debut, Love Actually, remains a rare film that at once parodies, celebrates, and reclaims, storytelling's most bastardised genre. But Curtis' most accomplished movie has everything and nothing to do with his reputation as the King of (Romantic) Comedy.

About Time (2013), starring Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson in a breakthrough role, cleverly weaponises its maker's stature. It counts on the fact that we anticipate an innovative (buzzword: time travel) but typically breezy love story. But the girl-boy arc fades into the background, and the film subverts our expectations by instead morphing into a deeply contemplative and winning tragedy about human nature. Curtis virtually uses his own career as a smokescreen to transform About Time into an affecting ode to closure and its elastic relationship with time. Early in the film, a retired James (Bill Nighy) informs his son Tim, a boy on the verge of big-city adulthood, that the men of the family possess the power to travel back in time. Naturally, at first, Tim abuses this cosmic gift like any red-blooded, teething male hero would - to find, and refine, his pursuit of love. He meets Mary, an American girl, and manipulates time in a manner that compels her to fall for him. You'd imagine any writer at this point would be tempted to use time travel as the pivot to continue navigating the cross-cultural politics of companionship. But Curtis refrains from old-school gimmickry. He designs the narrative device as a trigger that forces Tim's conflict to be conceived in the personal chasm that separates selfishness from selflessness: The selfishness of love from the selflessness of family.

Tim's story gets us thinking: do some of us subconsciously fail to sustain romantic relationships because we're unwilling to snap that umbilical cord? Do we postpone marriage - a family, children, onwardness -to preserve the fading remnants of our family? To keep our history accessible? The film's lyrical circularity exposes an uncomfortable truth about life - that romance is inherently an act of self-preservation. That loving someone, often, is a mechanism aimed at leaving something - and some times - behind. We choose to get consumed by life so that its origins are exhumed no more. For every child Tim has, the more irrevocably he drifts away from his own childhood. Every birth is inextricably linked to his rebirth. For each milestone he crosses as a life partner, the rules of time travel - a cinematic allegory for the texture of remembrance - force him to live rather than relive. Love is, after all, the emotional manifestation of the precise moment the future decides to break up with the past.

Q. How did Curtis refrain from following the usual story arc?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 4

Option (b) is the correct answer as it explains as to 'how' Curtis circumvents the usual story arc by not over-emphasizing on the usual expectations from movies based on time travel.

Option (a) contradicts the information provided in the passage, while the other options are irrelevant.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 5

British filmmaker Richard Curtis has written iconic popcultural classics like Mr. Bean, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill and Bridget Jones's Diary. His directorial debut, Love Actually, remains a rare film that at once parodies, celebrates, and reclaims, storytelling's most bastardised genre. But Curtis' most accomplished movie has everything and nothing to do with his reputation as the King of (Romantic) Comedy.

About Time (2013), starring Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson in a breakthrough role, cleverly weaponises its maker's stature. It counts on the fact that we anticipate an innovative (buzzword: time travel) but typically breezy love story. But the girl-boy arc fades into the background, and the film subverts our expectations by instead morphing into a deeply contemplative and winning tragedy about human nature. Curtis virtually uses his own career as a smokescreen to transform About Time into an affecting ode to closure and its elastic relationship with time. Early in the film, a retired James (Bill Nighy) informs his son Tim, a boy on the verge of big-city adulthood, that the men of the family possess the power to travel back in time. Naturally, at first, Tim abuses this cosmic gift like any red-blooded, teething male hero would - to find, and refine, his pursuit of love. He meets Mary, an American girl, and manipulates time in a manner that compels her to fall for him. You'd imagine any writer at this point would be tempted to use time travel as the pivot to continue navigating the cross-cultural politics of companionship. But Curtis refrains from old-school gimmickry. He designs the narrative device as a trigger that forces Tim's conflict to be conceived in the personal chasm that separates selfishness from selflessness: The selfishness of love from the selflessness of family.

Tim's story gets us thinking: do some of us subconsciously fail to sustain romantic relationships because we're unwilling to snap that umbilical cord? Do we postpone marriage - a family, children, onwardness -to preserve the fading remnants of our family? To keep our history accessible? The film's lyrical circularity exposes an uncomfortable truth about life - that romance is inherently an act of self-preservation. That loving someone, often, is a mechanism aimed at leaving something - and some times - behind. We choose to get consumed by life so that its origins are exhumed no more. For every child Tim has, the more irrevocably he drifts away from his own childhood. Every birth is inextricably linked to his rebirth. For each milestone he crosses as a life partner, the rules of time travel - a cinematic allegory for the texture of remembrance - force him to live rather than relive. Love is, after all, the emotional manifestation of the precise moment the future decides to break up with the past.

Q. Which genre has been referred as to as the 'most bastardised genre' initially in the passage?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 5

Option (d) is correct as the first paragraph mentions that the movie in consideration, 'Love Actually' is a romantic comedy.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 6

A large number of the branches of banks have been set up in the villages. The main purpose of setting up these banks is to develop the habit of saving among the villagers and also gives loans to the farmers for boosting the production in one or the other way. So far the banks had been concentrated in the big cities and Indian villagers had no faith in them. The new banks also intend re-channelling bank credit from the big industries to small sectors. With the intention to promote rural banking, Regional Rural Banks were established. These combined the local field with the rural problems. These banks are not to replace the other credit giving bodies but to supplement them.

The Steering Committee of the Regional Rural Banks considered some structural changes. First of all they gave thought to the staffing spectrum then to effective coordination among banks- rural cooperatives and commercial-and the possibility of bringing credit within the access of weaker sections. They wanted to recruit the staff for the rural banks at lower salaries. But this type of discrimination would have been dangerous. So it was given up.

Another problem with regard to the rural banks is the creditworthiness of the poor. Indian farmers are so poor that they cannot pay back their loans. The rural Indian surveys it quite clear that practically they have no credit worthiness. Their socio-economic mobility is almost zero. Long ago in Ranchi the Government experimented with the idea of advancing loan but the experiment failed, that is why the banks used to fear that their credit would never be paid back.

Another difficulty for the rural banks is that loans cannot be so easily processed. Processing loans will also entail heavy expenditure. This is also going to affect their financial position. Still the establishment of the rural banks has been decided because the social advantages are more important than the commercial consideration.

Rural banks will definitely encourage savings. It is not the proper time to mop up the rural surplus. No doubt villages do not have to pay income tax and they get many other concessions, yet their saving is not significant. Beside all these hurdles rural banking system will boost up the economy of villages, and so the economy of the country.

Q. Why has the establishment of rural banks been decided despite the challenges involved in the process?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 6

Processing loans will also entail heavy expenditure. This is also going to affect their financial position. Still the establishment of the rural banks has been decided because the social advantages are more important than the commercial considerations.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 7

A large number of the branches of banks have been set up in the villages. The main purpose of setting up these banks is to develop the habit of saving among the villagers and also gives loans to the farmers for boosting the production in one or the other way. So far the banks had been concentrated in the big cities and Indian villagers had no faith in them. The new banks also intend re-channelling bank credit from the big industries to small sectors. With the intention to promote rural banking, Regional Rural Banks were established. These combined the local field with the rural problems. These banks are not to replace the other credit giving bodies but to supplement them.

The Steering Committee of the Regional Rural Banks considered some structural changes. First of all they gave thought to the staffing spectrum then to effective coordination among banks- rural cooperatives and commercial-and the possibility of bringing credit within the access of weaker sections. They wanted to recruit the staff for the rural banks at lower salaries. But this type of discrimination would have been dangerous. So it was given up.

Another problem with regard to the rural banks is the creditworthiness of the poor. Indian farmers are so poor that they cannot pay back their loans. The rural Indian surveys it quite clear that practically they have no credit worthiness. Their socio-economic mobility is almost zero. Long ago in Ranchi the Government experimented with the idea of advancing loan but the experiment failed, that is why the banks used to fear that their credit would never be paid back.

Another difficulty for the rural banks is that loans cannot be so easily processed. Processing loans will also entail heavy expenditure. This is also going to affect their financial position. Still the establishment of the rural banks has been decided because the social advantages are more important than the commercial consideration.

Rural banks will definitely encourage savings. It is not the proper time to mop up the rural surplus. No doubt villages do not have to pay income tax and they get many other concessions, yet their saving is not significant. Beside all these hurdles rural banking system will boost up the economy of villages, and so the economy of the country.

Q. What is the main purpose for setting up rural banks?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 7

A large number of the branches of banks have been set up in the villages. The main purpose of setting up these banks is to develop the habit of saving among the villagers and also give loans to the farmers for boosting the production in one or the other way. So far the banks have been concentrated in the big cities and Indian villagers have no faith in them.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 8

A large number of the branches of banks have been set up in the villages. The main purpose of setting up these banks is to develop the habit of saving among the villagers and also gives loans to the farmers for boosting the production in one or the other way. So far the banks had been concentrated in the big cities and Indian villagers had no faith in them. The new banks also intend re-channelling bank credit from the big industries to small sectors. With the intention to promote rural banking, Regional Rural Banks were established. These combined the local field with the rural problems. These banks are not to replace the other credit giving bodies but to supplement them.

The Steering Committee of the Regional Rural Banks considered some structural changes. First of all they gave thought to the staffing spectrum then to effective coordination among banks- rural cooperatives and commercial-and the possibility of bringing credit within the access of weaker sections. They wanted to recruit the staff for the rural banks at lower salaries. But this type of discrimination would have been dangerous. So it was given up.

Another problem with regard to the rural banks is the creditworthiness of the poor. Indian farmers are so poor that they cannot pay back their loans. The rural Indian surveys it quite clear that practically they have no credit worthiness. Their socio-economic mobility is almost zero. Long ago in Ranchi the Government experimented with the idea of advancing loan but the experiment failed, that is why the banks used to fear that their credit would never be paid back.

Another difficulty for the rural banks is that loans cannot be so easily processed. Processing loans will also entail heavy expenditure. This is also going to affect their financial position. Still the establishment of the rural banks has been decided because the social advantages are more important than the commercial consideration.

Rural banks will definitely encourage savings. It is not the proper time to mop up the rural surplus. No doubt villages do not have to pay income tax and they get many other concessions, yet their saving is not significant. Beside all these hurdles rural banking system will boost up the economy of villages, and so the economy of the country.

Q. How will the RRBs help in the economy of the country?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 8

Rural banks will definitely encourage savings. It is not the proper time to mop up the rural surplus. No doubt, villages do not have to pay income tax and they get many other concessions, yet their saving is not significant. Beside all these hurdles rural banking system will boost up the economy of villages, and so the economy of the country.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 9

A large number of the branches of banks have been set up in the villages. The main purpose of setting up these banks is to develop the habit of saving among the villagers and also gives loans to the farmers for boosting the production in one or the other way. So far the banks had been concentrated in the big cities and Indian villagers had no faith in them. The new banks also intend re-channelling bank credit from the big industries to small sectors. With the intention to promote rural banking, Regional Rural Banks were established. These combined the local field with the rural problems. These banks are not to replace the other credit giving bodies but to supplement them.

The Steering Committee of the Regional Rural Banks considered some structural changes. First of all they gave thought to the staffing spectrum then to effective coordination among banks- rural cooperatives and commercial-and the possibility of bringing credit within the access of weaker sections. They wanted to recruit the staff for the rural banks at lower salaries. But this type of discrimination would have been dangerous. So it was given up.

Another problem with regard to the rural banks is the creditworthiness of the poor. Indian farmers are so poor that they cannot pay back their loans. The rural Indian surveys it quite clear that practically they have no credit worthiness. Their socio-economic mobility is almost zero. Long ago in Ranchi the Government experimented with the idea of advancing loan but the experiment failed, that is why the banks used to fear that their credit would never be paid back.

Another difficulty for the rural banks is that loans cannot be so easily processed. Processing loans will also entail heavy expenditure. This is also going to affect their financial position. Still the establishment of the rural banks has been decided because the social advantages are more important than the commercial consideration.

Rural banks will definitely encourage savings. It is not the proper time to mop up the rural surplus. No doubt villages do not have to pay income tax and they get many other concessions, yet their saving is not significant. Beside all these hurdles rural banking system will boost up the economy of villages, and so the economy of the country.

Q. What is the main challenge with setting up Regional Rural Banks?

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 10

A large number of the branches of banks have been set up in the villages. The main purpose of setting up these banks is to develop the habit of saving among the villagers and also gives loans to the farmers for boosting the production in one or the other way. So far the banks had been concentrated in the big cities and Indian villagers had no faith in them. The new banks also intend re-channelling bank credit from the big industries to small sectors. With the intention to promote rural banking, Regional Rural Banks were established. These combined the local field with the rural problems. These banks are not to replace the other credit giving bodies but to supplement them.

The Steering Committee of the Regional Rural Banks considered some structural changes. First of all they gave thought to the staffing spectrum then to effective coordination among banks- rural cooperatives and commercial-and the possibility of bringing credit within the access of weaker sections. They wanted to recruit the staff for the rural banks at lower salaries. But this type of discrimination would have been dangerous. So it was given up.

Another problem with regard to the rural banks is the creditworthiness of the poor. Indian farmers are so poor that they cannot pay back their loans. The rural Indian surveys it quite clear that practically they have no credit worthiness. Their socio-economic mobility is almost zero. Long ago in Ranchi the Government experimented with the idea of advancing loan but the experiment failed, that is why the banks used to fear that their credit would never be paid back.

Another difficulty for the rural banks is that loans cannot be so easily processed. Processing loans will also entail heavy expenditure. This is also going to affect their financial position. Still the establishment of the rural banks has been decided because the social advantages are more important than the commercial consideration.

Rural banks will definitely encourage savings. It is not the proper time to mop up the rural surplus. No doubt villages do not have to pay income tax and they get many other concessions, yet their saving is not significant. Beside all these hurdles rural banking system will boost up the economy of villages, and so the economy of the country.

Q. "This type of discrim i nation would have been dangerous". What is referred to as being dangerous?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 10

First of all they gave thought to the staffing spectrum then to effective coordination among banks - rural cooperatives and commercial and the possibility of bringing credit within the access of weaker sections. They wanted to recruit the staff for the rural banks at lower salaries. But this type of discrimination would have been dangerous.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 11

Poetry is an art form that has survived for thousands and thousands of years. We study it in school, and we hear quotes from poems scattered throughout our life.

But do we ever truly make meaning of it? Does it even matter? My answer to you is yes it does. Reading poetry and or writing poetry can drastically improve your life.

Poetry is one of the most powerful forms of writing because it takes the English language, a language we believe we know, and transforms it. The pattern of the sentences sounds new and melodious. It is truly another language exclusively for the writer and the reader. No poem can be read in the same way, because the words mean something different to each of us. For this reason, many find poetry an elusive art form. However, the issue in understanding poetry lies in how you read poetry.

Anyone who writes poetry can attest, you have to write it with an open heart. So, as a reader, we must do the same. Opening your heart to poetry is the only way to get fulfillment from it.

From a writer's perspective, writing poetry can be equally elusive as reading poetry. When I first started writing poetry, the advice I always heard was practice, find your voice, keep a journal. I did all these things but still my poems were flat and inert. What was I missing? I poured over poems by Angelou, Shakespeare, Austen, and Wilde looking for a pattern, something I could emulate. This was the problem. I was unwilling to open my heart. I thought poetry could be a mask I could craft. But no matter how beautiful I made it; it would never come to life. It would never fit on another person's face. It did not ever fit on mine.

My first poem that came alive was written in the dark late at night. Vulnerability was the key. Poetry is about expressing those thoughts and feelings we keep the most suppressed. We must be honest with ourselves about what we feel in order to write anything worth reading. It's stopping and grabbing a thought by the tail and pulling it up into our conscious mind. It's trying to express the beauty, and wonder we see. It's about connecting our hearts and our minds to ourselves and our surroundings.

It's about finding peace.

So, reach for the pen, and let go of those things that have been burdening your freedom. Read poetry with your heart and let it affect you. The answer to our questions about the meaning of life, and the purpose of pain were written in poems. They have always been there.

Q. Which of the following best describes the writing style of the author?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 11

Option (b) is the correct answer as the author shares his personal experience to guide the reader about poetry writing in an immersive way.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 12

Poetry is an art form that has survived for thousands and thousands of years. We study it in school, and we hear quotes from poems scattered throughout our life.

But do we ever truly make meaning of it? Does it even matter? My answer to you is yes it does. Reading poetry and or writing poetry can drastically improve your life.

Poetry is one of the most powerful forms of writing because it takes the English language, a language we believe we know, and transforms it. The pattern of the sentences sounds new and melodious. It is truly another language exclusively for the writer and the reader. No poem can be read in the same way, because the words mean something different to each of us. For this reason, many find poetry an elusive art form. However, the issue in understanding poetry lies in how you read poetry.

Anyone who writes poetry can attest, you have to write it with an open heart. So, as a reader, we must do the same. Opening your heart to poetry is the only way to get fulfillment from it.

From a writer's perspective, writing poetry can be equally elusive as reading poetry. When I first started writing poetry, the advice I always heard was practice, find your voice, keep a journal. I did all these things but still my poems were flat and inert. What was I missing? I poured over poems by Angelou, Shakespeare, Austen, and Wilde looking for a pattern, something I could emulate. This was the problem. I was unwilling to open my heart. I thought poetry could be a mask I could craft. But no matter how beautiful I made it; it would never come to life. It would never fit on another person's face. It did not ever fit on mine.

My first poem that came alive was written in the dark late at night. Vulnerability was the key. Poetry is about expressing those thoughts and feelings we keep the most suppressed. We must be honest with ourselves about what we feel in order to write anything worth reading. It's stopping and grabbing a thought by the tail and pulling it up into our conscious mind. It's trying to express the beauty, and wonder we see. It's about connecting our hearts and our minds to ourselves and our surroundings.

It's about finding peace.

So, reach for the pen, and let go of those things that have been burdening your freedom. Read poetry with your heart and let it affect you. The answer to our questions about the meaning of life, and the purpose of pain were written in poems. They have always been there.

Q. Which of the following is required to realize the true essence of poetry?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 12

Option (c) is the correct answer as the author stresses on the importance of the willingness to explore poems with an open mind and heart.

According to the author this help in realizing the true meaning behind poems. All other options are incorrect as they do not address the point about the way one should approach poetry. They make physical remarks that have not been addressed in the passage.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 13

Poetry is an art form that has survived for thousands and thousands of years. We study it in school, and we hear quotes from poems scattered throughout our life.

But do we ever truly make meaning of it? Does it even matter? My answer to you is yes it does. Reading poetry and or writing poetry can drastically improve your life.

Poetry is one of the most powerful forms of writing because it takes the English language, a language we believe we know, and transforms it. The pattern of the sentences sounds new and melodious. It is truly another language exclusively for the writer and the reader. No poem can be read in the same way, because the words mean something different to each of us. For this reason, many find poetry an elusive art form. However, the issue in understanding poetry lies in how you read poetry.

Anyone who writes poetry can attest, you have to write it with an open heart. So, as a reader, we must do the same. Opening your heart to poetry is the only way to get fulfillment from it.

From a writer's perspective, writing poetry can be equally elusive as reading poetry. When I first started writing poetry, the advice I always heard was practice, find your voice, keep a journal. I did all these things but still my poems were flat and inert. What was I missing? I poured over poems by Angelou, Shakespeare, Austen, and Wilde looking for a pattern, something I could emulate. This was the problem. I was unwilling to open my heart. I thought poetry could be a mask I could craft. But no matter how beautiful I made it; it would never come to life. It would never fit on another person's face. It did not ever fit on mine.

My first poem that came alive was written in the dark late at night. Vulnerability was the key. Poetry is about expressing those thoughts and feelings we keep the most suppressed. We must be honest with ourselves about what we feel in order to write anything worth reading. It's stopping and grabbing a thought by the tail and pulling it up into our conscious mind. It's trying to express the beauty, and wonder we see. It's about connecting our hearts and our minds to ourselves and our surroundings.

It's about finding peace.

So, reach for the pen, and let go of those things that have been burdening your freedom. Read poetry with your heart and let it affect you. The answer to our questions about the meaning of life, and the purpose of pain were written in poems. They have always been there.

Q. According to the writer, what makes a poem worth reading?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 13

Option (b) is correct as clarity of thought is essential to quality poetry-writing. This clarity could only be achieved by being completely honest about oneself and about one's feelings.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 14

Poetry is an art form that has survived for thousands and thousands of years. We study it in school, and we hear quotes from poems scattered throughout our life.

But do we ever truly make meaning of it? Does it even matter? My answer to you is yes it does. Reading poetry and or writing poetry can drastically improve your life.

Poetry is one of the most powerful forms of writing because it takes the English language, a language we believe we know, and transforms it. The pattern of the sentences sounds new and melodious. It is truly another language exclusively for the writer and the reader. No poem can be read in the same way, because the words mean something different to each of us. For this reason, many find poetry an elusive art form. However, the issue in understanding poetry lies in how you read poetry.

Anyone who writes poetry can attest, you have to write it with an open heart. So, as a reader, we must do the same. Opening your heart to poetry is the only way to get fulfillment from it.

From a writer's perspective, writing poetry can be equally elusive as reading poetry. When I first started writing poetry, the advice I always heard was practice, find your voice, keep a journal. I did all these things but still my poems were flat and inert. What was I missing? I poured over poems by Angelou, Shakespeare, Austen, and Wilde looking for a pattern, something I could emulate. This was the problem. I was unwilling to open my heart. I thought poetry could be a mask I could craft. But no matter how beautiful I made it; it would never come to life. It would never fit on another person's face. It did not ever fit on mine.

My first poem that came alive was written in the dark late at night. Vulnerability was the key. Poetry is about expressing those thoughts and feelings we keep the most suppressed. We must be honest with ourselves about what we feel in order to write anything worth reading. It's stopping and grabbing a thought by the tail and pulling it up into our conscious mind. It's trying to express the beauty, and wonder we see. It's about connecting our hearts and our minds to ourselves and our surroundings.

It's about finding peace.

So, reach for the pen, and let go of those things that have been burdening your freedom. Read poetry with your heart and let it affect you. The answer to our questions about the meaning of life, and the purpose of pain were written in poems. They have always been there.

Q. As mentioned in the passage, "nuances" most nearly means

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 14

Option (d) is correct as in the context of the passage "nuances" means a very small difference in the meaning behind poetry.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 15

Poetry is an art form that has survived for thousands and thousands of years. We study it in school, and we hear quotes from poems scattered throughout our life.

But do we ever truly make meaning of it? Does it even matter? My answer to you is yes it does. Reading poetry and or writing poetry can drastically improve your life.

Poetry is one of the most powerful forms of writing because it takes the English language, a language we believe we know, and transforms it. The pattern of the sentences sounds new and melodious. It is truly another language exclusively for the writer and the reader. No poem can be read in the same way, because the words mean something different to each of us. For this reason, many find poetry an elusive art form. However, the issue in understanding poetry lies in how you read poetry.

Anyone who writes poetry can attest, you have to write it with an open heart. So, as a reader, we must do the same. Opening your heart to poetry is the only way to get fulfillment from it.

From a writer's perspective, writing poetry can be equally elusive as reading poetry. When I first started writing poetry, the advice I always heard was practice, find your voice, keep a journal. I did all these things but still my poems were flat and inert. What was I missing? I poured over poems by Angelou, Shakespeare, Austen, and Wilde looking for a pattern, something I could emulate. This was the problem. I was unwilling to open my heart. I thought poetry could be a mask I could craft. But no matter how beautiful I made it; it would never come to life. It would never fit on another person's face. It did not ever fit on mine.

My first poem that came alive was written in the dark late at night. Vulnerability was the key. Poetry is about expressing those thoughts and feelings we keep the most suppressed. We must be honest with ourselves about what we feel in order to write anything worth reading. It's stopping and grabbing a thought by the tail and pulling it up into our conscious mind. It's trying to express the beauty, and wonder we see. It's about connecting our hearts and our minds to ourselves and our surroundings.

It's about finding peace.

So, reach for the pen, and let go of those things that have been burdening your freedom. Read poetry with your heart and let it affect you. The answer to our questions about the meaning of life, and the purpose of pain were written in poems. They have always been there.

Q. Which of the following correctly mentions the demerit of emulating others in writing poetry?

Detailed Solution for Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 15

Option ( a) is correct as the author employs metaphors to convey the point of relating to others.

Putting on someone else's poetry as a mask is a metaphor for being able to relate to others. Options (b), (c) and (d) are incorrect as they make assumptions that are not a part of the passage.

Languages: Mock Test - 6 - Question 16

Relationships are how we relate to others. We have relationships with everyone we know and those who are close to us. Each and every interaction we have with another person is the act of relating. If we have a problem relating to others, it affects our ability to have supportive relationships. We have to ask ourselves if our relationships are supportive, and if they are not, then ask why they are not,

Everyone wants the perfect romance or marriage, but not everyone looks at the mechanics of how to have one. If we fail to have supportive relationships in our life, how can we have the "perfect love" relationships? Through the act of supporting, we honour and validate who the other person is.

This is turn, validates who we are. So, both are supported; no one loses; no egos are involved; and, so doing, we honour the relationship.

This is what it means to have a supportive relationship. This is the desired goal. Now, how do we accomplish it?

Our conduct patterns, 'positive' or 'negative' get set as we grow up. In order to clear a problem, one must identify the original cause which created a behavioural pattern, move through the experience of that situation and experience the emotions associated with it.

The healing process is a time when we must love the self. If we beat up the self about the experience which had caused us harm or our past reaction to it, then we cannot heal. In being loving to the self, we validate what we had experienced at that time.

Our emotions are always valid. So, it is important for us to do this self-validation in order to heal. Love is the energy which helps us heal-whether we give this love to ourselves or receive it from another.

Loving relations start with the self. When we look at having supportive relationship in our life, why not start with the self?

Because that is where love comes from. This is what transforms our relationships and our lives. We must love the self first. And we cannot do that until we have healed and become whole. Spiritually we must rise, and our spiritual quotient must be high.

For, it is not