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XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - CAT MCQ


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100 Questions MCQ Test Mock Test Series for XAT - XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern)

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) for CAT 2024 is part of Mock Test Series for XAT preparation. The XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) MCQs are made for CAT 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) below.
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XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 1

In each of the questions below, five sentences, labeled A, B, C, D and E, are given. They need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the most appropriate option.

A. Archaeologists have found evidence of Mesopotamian beer-making dating back to the fourth millennium B.C.

B. Along with inventing writing, the wheel, the plow, law codes and literature, the Sumerians are also remembered as some of history's original brewers.

C. The brewing techniques they used are still a mystery, but their preferred ale seems to have been a barley-based concoction so thick that it had to be sipped through a special kind of filtration straw.

D. The Sumerians prized their beer for its nutrient-rich ingredients and hailed it as the key to a "joyful heart and a contented liver."

E. There was even a Sumerian goddess of brewing called "Ninkasi," who is celebrated in a famous hymn as the "one who waters the malt set on the ground."

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 1

Sentences B and C are a pair: B tells us about the fact that the Sumerians were the earliest brewers in history. C then follows by telling us about their brewing techniques. Options 2 and 3 are eliminated.

Sentences D and E are also a pair: D tells us about how highly the Sumerians considered their beer, and E then builds up on this by telling us this is proved by the fact that they also worshipped a goddess of brewing. Options 4 and 5 are eliminated.

Option 1 is the right answer.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 2

In each of the question below, a sentence is given with a portion underlined. Choose the best replacement (if needed) for the underlined portion to make the sentence meaningful and grammatically correct

The landlady said she would move heaven and earth, for so good a gentleman; and then consented to give me her sleeping-room on the ground-floor, at some trifle or other, - I forget what.

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 2

Such is a determiner; so is an adverb. They often have the same meaning of 'very' or 'to this degree'. We use such + noun phrase and so + adjective or adverb phrase. Here, in this case, it makes sense to use 'so' and not 'such'. Options B, C and D are eliminated. Option 1 is the right answer.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

There is an Indian savagery, a savagery peculiar to the Indian blood, in the manner in which the Americans strive after gold: and the breathless hurry of their work - the characteristic vice of the New World - already begins to infect old Europe, and makes it savage also, spreading over it a strange lack of intellectuality.

One is now ashamed of repose: even long reflection almost causes remorse of conscience. Thinking is done with a stop-watch, as dining is done with the eyes fixed on the financial newspaper; we live like men who are continually "afraid of letting opportunities slip." "Better do anything whatever, than nothing" - this principle also is a noose with which all culture and all higher taste may be strangled. And just as all form obviously disappears in this hurry of workers, so the sense for form itself, the ear and the eye for the melody of movement, also disappear.

For life in the hunt for gain continually compels a person to consume his intellect, even to exhaustion, in constant dissimulation, overreaching, or forestalling: the real virtue nowadays is to do something in a shorter time than another person. And so there are only rare hours of sincere intercourse permitted: in them, however, people are tired, and would not only like "to let themselves go," but to stretch their legs out wide in awkward style.

The way people write their letters nowadays is quite in keeping with the age; their style and spirit will always be the true "sign of the times." If there be still enjoyment in society and in art, it is enjoyment such as over-worked slaves provide for themselves. Oh, this moderation in "joy" of our cultured and uncultured classes! Oh, this increasing suspiciousness of all enjoyment! Work is winning over more and more the good conscience to its side: the desire for enjoyment already calls itself "need of recreation," and even begins to be ashamed of itself.

"One owes it to one's health," people say, when they are caught at a picnic. Indeed, it might soon go so far that one could not yield to the desire for the vita contemplative, (that is to say, excursions with thoughts and friends), without self-contempt and a bad conscience. Well! Formerly it was the very reverse: it was "action" that suffered from a bad conscience. A man of good family concealed his work when need compelled him to labour. The slave laboured under the weight of the feeling that he did something contemptible: the "doing" itself was something contemptible. "Only in otium and bellum is there nobility and honour:" so rang the voice of ancient prejudice!

Which of the following is the central theme explored in the passage?

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 3

Option 2 is eliminated as the passage does not compare or contrast the amount of hard work done in the present and the past. Option 3 is eliminated as the passage does not talk about the 'busy times of today'. Rather it talks about how people overwork themselves in present times and avoid rest. Option 4 is eliminated as this forms only a brief part of the passage, and is not the central theme. Option 1 is the right answer as the passage focuses on discussing how rest and enjoyment is discouraged in present times.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

There is an Indian savagery, a savagery peculiar to the Indian blood, in the manner in which the Americans strive after gold: and the breathless hurry of their work - the characteristic vice of the New World - already begins to infect old Europe, and makes it savage also, spreading over it a strange lack of intellectuality.

One is now ashamed of repose: even long reflection almost causes remorse of conscience. Thinking is done with a stop-watch, as dining is done with the eyes fixed on the financial newspaper; we live like men who are continually "afraid of letting opportunities slip." "Better do anything whatever, than nothing" - this principle also is a noose with which all culture and all higher taste may be strangled. And just as all form obviously disappears in this hurry of workers, so the sense for form itself, the ear and the eye for the melody of movement, also disappear.

For life in the hunt for gain continually compels a person to consume his intellect, even to exhaustion, in constant dissimulation, overreaching, or forestalling: the real virtue nowadays is to do something in a shorter time than another person. And so there are only rare hours of sincere intercourse permitted: in them, however, people are tired, and would not only like "to let themselves go," but to stretch their legs out wide in awkward style.

The way people write their letters nowadays is quite in keeping with the age; their style and spirit will always be the true "sign of the times." If there be still enjoyment in society and in art, it is enjoyment such as over-worked slaves provide for themselves. Oh, this moderation in "joy" of our cultured and uncultured classes! Oh, this increasing suspiciousness of all enjoyment! Work is winning over more and more the good conscience to its side: the desire for enjoyment already calls itself "need of recreation," and even begins to be ashamed of itself.

"One owes it to one's health," people say, when they are caught at a picnic. Indeed, it might soon go so far that one could not yield to the desire for the vita contemplative, (that is to say, excursions with thoughts and friends), without self-contempt and a bad conscience. Well!

Formerly it was the very reverse: it was "action" that suffered from a bad conscience. A man of good family concealed his work when need compelled him to labour. The slave laboured under the weight of the feeling that he did something contemptible: the "doing" itself was something contemptible. "Only in otium and bellum is there nobility and honour:" so rang the voice of ancient prejudice!

According to the author, what is the difference in the past and present times, with regard to action and inaction?

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 4

Option 1 is eliminated as the passage only talks about the present in this regard, and does not tell us if people were considered to be lazy or not in the past for spending some time in repose. Option 3 is eliminated as the passage does not talk about the judgementalness of people. Option 4 is eliminated as the passage gives insufficient information to make this claim. Option 2 is the right answer as it can be validated from the last paragraph.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 5

Directions : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

There is an Indian savagery, a savagery peculiar to the Indian blood, in the manner in which the Americans strive after gold: and the breathless hurry of their work - the characteristic vice of the New World - already begins to infect old Europe, and makes it savage also, spreading over it a strange lack of intellectuality.

One is now ashamed of repose: even long reflection almost causes remorse of conscience. Thinking is done with a stop-watch, as dining is done with the eyes fixed on the financial newspaper; we live like men who are continually "afraid of letting opportunities slip." "Better do anything whatever, than nothing" - this principle also is a noose with which all culture and all higher taste may be strangled. And just as all form obviously disappears in this hurry of workers, so the sense for form itself, the ear and the eye for the melody of movement, also disappear.

For life in the hunt for gain continually compels a person to consume his intellect, even to exhaustion, in constant dissimulation, overreaching, or forestalling: the real virtue nowadays is to do something in a shorter time than another person. And so there are only rare hours of sincere intercourse permitted: in them, however, people are tired, and would not only like "to let themselves go," but to stretch their legs out wide in awkward style.

The way people write their letters nowadays is quite in keeping with the age; their style and spirit will always be the true "sign of the times." If there be still enjoyment in society and in art, it is enjoyment such as over-worked slaves provide for themselves. Oh, this moderation in "joy" of our cultured and uncultured classes! Oh, this increasing suspiciousness of all enjoyment! Work is winning over more and more the good conscience to its side: the desire for enjoyment already calls itself "need of recreation," and even begins to be ashamed of itself.

"One owes it to one's health," people say, when they are caught at a picnic. Indeed, it might soon go so far that one could not yield to the desire for the vita contemplative, (that is to say, excursions with thoughts and friends), without self-contempt and a bad conscience. Well! Formerly it was the very reverse: it was "action" that suffered from a bad conscience. A man of good family concealed his work when need compelled him to labour. The slave laboured under the weight of the feeling that he did something contemptible: the "doing" itself was something contemptible. "Only in otium and bellum is there nobility and honour:" so rang the voice of ancient prejudice!

Which of the following would be the most suitable title of the passage?

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 5

Option 1 is eliminated as the passage is not about the pleasures of present life and how they might be enjoyed. Option 2 is eliminated as the passage is not only about the perceptions of action and inaction in the present, but also about the perceptions in the past, and how they have changed. Option 3 is eliminated as the passage does not throw light on any mystery of action or inaction. Option 4 is the right answer as it best encapsulates the main idea of the passage to provide a suitable title.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

When Chesterton wrote his introductions to the Everyman Edition of Dickens's works, it seemed quite natural to him to credit Dickens with his own highly individual brand of medievalism, and more recently a Marxist writer, Mr. T. A. Jackson, has made spirited efforts to turn Dickens into a blood-thirsty revolutionary. The Marxist claims him as 'almost' a Marxist, the Catholic claims him as 'almost' a Catholic, and both claim him as a champion of the proletariat (or 'the poor', as Chesterton would have put it). On the other hand, Nadezhda Krupskaya, in her little book on Lenin, relates that towards the end of his life Lenin went to see a dramatized version of The Cricket on the Hearth, and found Dickens's 'middle-class sentimentality' so intolerable that he walked out in the middle of a scene.

Taking 'middle-class' to mean what Krupskaya might be expected to mean by it, this was probably a truer judgement than those of Chesterton and Jackson. But it is worth noticing that the dislike of Dickens implied in this remark is something unusual. Plenty of people have found him unreadable, but very few seem to have felt any hostility towards the general spirit of his work.

Some years later Mr. Bechhofer Roberts published a full-length attack on Dickens in the form of a novel (This Side Idolatry), but it was a merely personal attack, concerned for the most part with Dickens's treatment of his wife. It dealt with incidents which not one in a thousand of Dickens's readers would ever hear about, and which no more invalidates his work than the second-best bed invalidates Hamlet. All that the book really demonstrated was that a writer's literary personality has little or nothing to do with his private character. It is quite possible that in private life Dickens was just the kind of insensitive egoist that Mr. Bechhofer Roberts makes him appear. But in his published work there is implied a personality quite different from this, a personality which has won him far more friends than enemies.

In Oliver Twist, Hard Times, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, Dickens attacked English institutions with a ferocity that has never since been approached. Yet he managed to do it without making himself hated, and, more than this, the very people he attacked have swallowed him so completely that he has become a national institution himself. In its attitude towards Dickens the English public has always been a little like the elephant which feels a blow with a walking-stick as a delightful tickling.

Before I was ten years old I was having Dickens ladled down my throat by schoolmasters in whom even at that age I could see a strong resemblance to Mr. Creakle, and one knows without needing to be told that lawyers delight in Sergeant Buzfuz and that Little Dorrit is a favourite in the Home Office. Dickens seems to have succeeded in attacking everybody and antagonizing nobody. Naturally this makes one wonder whether after all there was something unreal in his attack upon society. Where exactly does he stand, socially, morally, and politically? As usual, one can define his position more easily if one starts by deciding what he was not.

The passage is most likely to be an excerpt from which of the following?

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 6

Option 1 is eliminated as the passage does not give a review on any one of Dickens' books, rather it talks about Dickens himself. Option 3 is eliminated as the passage does not give a historical account of the events in Dickens' life, so it is unlikely to be from a newspaper article. Option 4 is eliminated as the passage focuses primarily only on Dickens, and not on other authors, Marxist or otherwise. Option 2 is the right answer as the passage is most likely to be an excerpt from an essay about Dickens.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 7

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

When Chesterton wrote his introductions to the Everyman Edition of Dickens's works, it seemed quite natural to him to credit Dickens with his own highly individual brand of medievalism, and more recently a Marxist writer, Mr. T. A. Jackson, has made spirited efforts to turn Dickens into a blood-thirsty revolutionary. The Marxist claims him as 'almost' a Marxist, the Catholic claims him as 'almost' a Catholic, and both claim him as a champion of the proletariat (or 'the poor', as Chesterton would have put it). On the other hand, Nadezhda Krupskaya, in her little book on Lenin, relates that towards the end of his life Lenin went to see a dramatized version of The Cricket on the Hearth, and found Dickens's 'middle-class sentimentality' so intolerable that he walked out in the middle of a scene.

Taking 'middle-class' to mean what Krupskaya might be expected to mean by it, this was probably a truer judgement than those of Chesterton and Jackson. But it is worth noticing that the dislike of Dickens implied in this remark is something unusual. Plenty of people have found him unreadable, but very few seem to have felt any hostility towards the general spirit of his work.

Some years later Mr. Bechhofer Roberts published a full-length attack on Dickens in the form of a novel (This Side Idolatry), but it was a merely personal attack, concerned for the most part with Dickens's treatment of his wife. It dealt with incidents which not one in a thousand of Dickens's readers would ever hear about, and which no more invalidates his work than the second-best bed invalidates Hamlet. All that the book really demonstrated was that a writer's literary personality has little or nothing to do with his private character. It is quite possible that in private life Dickens was just the kind of insensitive egoist that Mr. Bechhofer Roberts makes him appear. But in his published work there is implied a personality quite different from this, a personality which has won him far more friends than enemies.

In Oliver Twist, Hard Times, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, Dickens attacked English institutions with a ferocity that has never since been approached. Yet he managed to do it without making himself hated, and, more than this, the very people he attacked have swallowed him so completely that he has become a national institution himself. In its attitude towards Dickens the English public has always been a little like the elephant which feels a blow with a walking-stick as a delightful tickling.

Before I was ten years old I was having Dickens ladled down my throat by schoolmasters in whom even at that age I could see a strong resemblance to Mr. Creakle, and one knows without needing to be told that lawyers delight in Sergeant Buzfuz and that Little Dorrit is a favourite in the Home Office. Dickens seems to have succeeded in attacking everybody and antagonizing nobody. Naturally this makes one wonder whether after all there was something unreal in his attack upon society. Where exactly does he stand, socially, morally, and politically? As usual, one can define his position more easily if one starts by deciding what he was not.

It can be inferred from the passage that the author:

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 7

Option 1 is eliminated as the author does not claim that Dickens' work did not deserve to be popular, on the contrary, he just wishes to explore the reasons as to why he managed to be so popular despite having criticized the society. Option 2 is eliminated as the author does not claim in any instance that Dickens criticized the society more than necessary. Option 3 is eliminated as the author does not talk about the implications which Dickens could have faced for criticizing the society, rather his unwavering popularity. Option 4 is the right answer it can be inferred from the last paragraphs of the passage.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 8

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

When Chesterton wrote his introductions to the Everyman Edition of Dickens's works, it seemed quite natural to him to credit Dickens with his own highly individual brand of medievalism, and more recently a Marxist writer, Mr. T. A. Jackson, has made spirited efforts to turn Dickens into a blood-thirsty revolutionary. The Marxist claims him as 'almost' a Marxist, the Catholic claims him as 'almost' a Catholic, and both claim him as a champion of the proletariat (or 'the poor', as Chesterton would have put it). On the other hand, Nadezhda Krupskaya, in her little book on Lenin, relates that towards the end of his life Lenin went to see a dramatized version of The Cricket on the Hearth, and found Dickens's 'middle-class sentimentality' so intolerable that he walked out in the middle of a scene.

Taking 'middle-class' to mean what Krupskaya might be expected to mean by it, this was probably a truer judgement than those of Chesterton and Jackson. But it is worth noticing that the dislike of Dickens implied in this remark is something unusual. Plenty of people have found him unreadable, but very few seem to have felt any hostility towards the general spirit of his work.

Some years later Mr. Bechhofer Roberts published a full-length attack on Dickens in the form of a novel (This Side Idolatry), but it was a merely personal attack, concerned for the most part with Dickens's treatment of his wife. It dealt with incidents which not one in a thousand of Dickens's readers would ever hear about, and which no more invalidates his work than the second-best bed invalidates Hamlet. All that the book really demonstrated was that a writer's literary personality has little or nothing to do with his private character. It is quite possible that in private life Dickens was just the kind of insensitive egoist that Mr. Bechhofer Roberts makes him appear. But in his published work there is implied a personality quite different from this, a personality which has won him far more friends than enemies.

In Oliver Twist, Hard Times, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, Dickens attacked English institutions with a ferocity that has never since been approached. Yet he managed to do it without making himself hated, and, more than this, the very people he attacked have swallowed him so completely that he has become a national institution himself. In its attitude towards Dickens the English public has always been a little like the elephant which feels a blow with a walking-stick as a delightful tickling.

Before I was ten years old I was having Dickens ladled down my throat by schoolmasters in whom even at that age I could see a strong resemblance to Mr. Creakle, and one knows without needing to be told that lawyers delight in Sergeant Buzfuz and that Little Dorrit is a favourite in the Home Office. Dickens seems to have succeeded in attacking everybody and antagonizing nobody. Naturally this makes one wonder whether after all there was something unreal in his attack upon society. Where exactly does he stand, socially, morally, and politically? As usual, one can define his position more easily if one starts by deciding what he was not.

The primary purpose of the third paragraph is:

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 8

Option 1 is eliminated as this is only a fact that is revealed in the third paragraph, the author's main purpose is not to reveal this fact but to use it to prove that despite being attacked having had a troubled personal life, Dickens continued to be popular. Option 2 is eliminated as the author does not negate Roberts' claims. Option 3 is eliminated as the author only talks about this critic's claims to prove a fact, his aim is not to talk about the critic itself. Option 5 is the right answer, as it best encapsulates the primary purpose of the third paragraph.

XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 9

In each of these questions, one word is given in the question and five words given in the options. Find the word which is most nearly the same or opposite in meaning to the given word.

rancour

Detailed Solution for XAT Mock Test - 4 (New Pattern) - Question 9

The word rancour means resentfulness. Option 1 is eliminated as it has the word pungency, which means having a strong smell. Option 2 is eliminated, as the word oblivion means a state of forgetfulness. Option 3 is eliminated, as prudery means to be easily offended. Option 4 is the right answer, as the word animosity, which means a bitterness, is closest in meaning to the given word.

XAT Mock Test -