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CAT Mock Test - 13 - CAT MCQ


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66 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2024 - CAT Mock Test - 13

CAT Mock Test - 13 for CAT 2024 is part of CAT Mock Test Series 2024 preparation. The CAT Mock Test - 13 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The CAT Mock Test - 13 MCQs are made for CAT 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for CAT Mock Test - 13 below.
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CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 1

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a question. Choose the best answer to the question.

Where there is a rule, there is also a violation of this rule. In a society regulated by laws, such a violation is called a crime. For centuries, crimes were among the major problems for societies to solve; criminals were detained, isolated, and punished - with varying severity - but it did not help to eliminate or prevent crime. As if this is not enough, in many countries, the problem of crime poses yet another challenge to both law enforcement systems and society in general - and this challenge is juvenile delinquency. It is more or less clear what to do with grown-up criminals: the range of actions against them varies from correctional labour to capital punishment, and is generally well thought out and adjusted. However, in the case of juvenile criminals, it is often unclear which punishment is appropriate, what causes underage individuals to commit crimes, and what are the ways to prevent it. There are, however, numerous theories regarding these questions.
The most obvious and widely discussed factor leading to juvenile delinquency is the surroundings in which children grow up. If the environment is not suitable, not contributing to a child's moral and intellectual development, he or she may grow up with a lack of strong moral guidance. One of the main constraints holding an individual from committing crimes is not obedience to the law, but rather the moral, ethical, the immanent understanding of what is right and what is wrong; usually, this develops under the influence of parents and beneficial surroundings such as friends, authoritative social groups, and so on. However, if there is little-to-no positive influence, children tend to develop moral poverty: the incapacity to control their behaviours guided by the aforementioned skills and principles.
Although the majority of sociologists and criminologists agree on the importance of the environment in which an individual grows up, there are more debated impacts causing juvenile delinquency. One of them is the influence of video games and other media such as music or TV programmes. It is true that contemporary media is filled with violence, sexual content, exploitation, and stereotypes. But it is doubtful that it can cause a mentally and morally healthy child from a normal family to cross the line and commit a crime.
What can, however, cause a morally stable juvenile to commit a crime is drugs. It becomes clear that in order to prevent or decrease juvenile delinquency, it is not enough to encourage parents to simply establish a stricter control over their children - doing so would be shifting responsibility from the whole society to its separate members. What parents can do, however, is try to keep their children away from dangerous substances; it is important to remember that although a teenager cannot be helped from rebelling (since this process is natural and caused by both mental and hormonal factors), he or she can be at least guided towards a more healthy rebellion: for example, skateboarding or street art instead of smoking marijuana.

Q. Which one of the following statements is true according to the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 1

According to the passage, 'The most obvious and widely discussed factor leading to juvenile delinquency is the surroundings in which children grow up.' Therefore, option 1 is the right answer.
Video games 'can' have a negative impact but are not the primary reason. So, option 2 is incorrect.
Juvenile delinquency may be an assertion but all teenagers do not resort to it. So, option 3 is incorrect.
Option 4 is also incorrect. The passage does not assert that parents should have stricter control over children. The passage states "It becomes clear that in order to prevent or decrease juvenile delinquency, it is not enough to encourage parents to simply establish a stricter control over their children - doing so would be shifting responsibility from the whole society to its separate members."

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 2

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a question. Choose the best answer to the question.

Where there is a rule, there is also a violation of this rule. In a society regulated by laws, such a violation is called a crime. For centuries, crimes were among the major problems for societies to solve; criminals were detained, isolated, and punished - with varying severity - but it did not help to eliminate or prevent crime. As if this is not enough, in many countries, the problem of crime poses yet another challenge to both law enforcement systems and society in general - and this challenge is juvenile delinquency. It is more or less clear what to do with grown-up criminals: the range of actions against them varies from correctional labour to capital punishment, and is generally well thought out and adjusted. However, in the case of juvenile criminals, it is often unclear which punishment is appropriate, what causes underage individuals to commit crimes, and what are the ways to prevent it. There are, however, numerous theories regarding these questions.
The most obvious and widely discussed factor leading to juvenile delinquency is the surroundings in which children grow up. If the environment is not suitable, not contributing to a child's moral and intellectual development, he or she may grow up with a lack of strong moral guidance. One of the main constraints holding an individual from committing crimes is not obedience to the law, but rather the moral, ethical, the immanent understanding of what is right and what is wrong; usually, this develops under the influence of parents and beneficial surroundings such as friends, authoritative social groups, and so on. However, if there is little-to-no positive influence, children tend to develop moral poverty: the incapacity to control their behaviours guided by the aforementioned skills and principles.
Although the majority of sociologists and criminologists agree on the importance of the environment in which an individual grows up, there are more debated impacts causing juvenile delinquency. One of them is the influence of video games and other media such as music or TV programmes. It is true that contemporary media is filled with violence, sexual content, exploitation, and stereotypes. But it is doubtful that it can cause a mentally and morally healthy child from a normal family to cross the line and commit a crime.
What can, however, cause a morally stable juvenile to commit a crime is drugs. It becomes clear that in order to prevent or decrease juvenile delinquency, it is not enough to encourage parents to simply establish a stricter control over their children - doing so would be shifting responsibility from the whole society to its separate members. What parents can do, however, is try to keep their children away from dangerous substances; it is important to remember that although a teenager cannot be helped from rebelling (since this process is natural and caused by both mental and hormonal factors), he or she can be at least guided towards a more healthy rebellion: for example, skateboarding or street art instead of smoking marijuana.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following can parents do to prevent their kids from becoming juvenile delinquents?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 2

According to the passage, 'What parents can do, however, is try to keep their children away from dangerous substances; it is important to remember that ... skateboarding or street art instead of smoking marijuana.' Therefore, option 1 is the answer.
Options 2 and 4 suggest the opposite of what is stated.
Option 3 is a choice between things that are equally bad so it is also incorrect.

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CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 3

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a question. Choose the best answer to the question.

Where there is a rule, there is also a violation of this rule. In a society regulated by laws, such a violation is called a crime. For centuries, crimes were among the major problems for societies to solve; criminals were detained, isolated, and punished - with varying severity - but it did not help to eliminate or prevent crime. As if this is not enough, in many countries, the problem of crime poses yet another challenge to both law enforcement systems and society in general - and this challenge is juvenile delinquency. It is more or less clear what to do with grown-up criminals: the range of actions against them varies from correctional labour to capital punishment, and is generally well thought out and adjusted. However, in the case of juvenile criminals, it is often unclear which punishment is appropriate, what causes underage individuals to commit crimes, and what are the ways to prevent it. There are, however, numerous theories regarding these questions.
The most obvious and widely discussed factor leading to juvenile delinquency is the surroundings in which children grow up. If the environment is not suitable, not contributing to a child's moral and intellectual development, he or she may grow up with a lack of strong moral guidance. One of the main constraints holding an individual from committing crimes is not obedience to the law, but rather the moral, ethical, the immanent understanding of what is right and what is wrong; usually, this develops under the influence of parents and beneficial surroundings such as friends, authoritative social groups, and so on. However, if there is little-to-no positive influence, children tend to develop moral poverty: the incapacity to control their behaviours guided by the aforementioned skills and principles.
Although the majority of sociologists and criminologists agree on the importance of the environment in which an individual grows up, there are more debated impacts causing juvenile delinquency. One of them is the influence of video games and other media such as music or TV programmes. It is true that contemporary media is filled with violence, sexual content, exploitation, and stereotypes. But it is doubtful that it can cause a mentally and morally healthy child from a normal family to cross the line and commit a crime.
What can, however, cause a morally stable juvenile to commit a crime is drugs. It becomes clear that in order to prevent or decrease juvenile delinquency, it is not enough to encourage parents to simply establish a stricter control over their children - doing so would be shifting responsibility from the whole society to its separate members. What parents can do, however, is try to keep their children away from dangerous substances; it is important to remember that although a teenager cannot be helped from rebelling (since this process is natural and caused by both mental and hormonal factors), he or she can be at least guided towards a more healthy rebellion: for example, skateboarding or street art instead of smoking marijuana.

Q. Which of the following statements about crimes is asserted by the author in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 3

According to the passage, 'Where there is a rule, there is also a violation of this rule. In a society regulated by laws, such a violation is called a crime. For centuries, crimes were among the major problems for societies to solve; criminals were detained, isolated, and punished - with varying severity - but it did not help to eliminate or prevent crime.' The main assertion here is option 4. These lines also contradict option 1 so it is incorrect.
The words 'the major' (in option 2) and 'severity of crime' (in option 3) make them weak.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 4

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a question. Choose the best answer to the question.

Where there is a rule, there is also a violation of this rule. In a society regulated by laws, such a violation is called a crime. For centuries, crimes were among the major problems for societies to solve; criminals were detained, isolated, and punished - with varying severity - but it did not help to eliminate or prevent crime. As if this is not enough, in many countries, the problem of crime poses yet another challenge to both law enforcement systems and society in general - and this challenge is juvenile delinquency. It is more or less clear what to do with grown-up criminals: the range of actions against them varies from correctional labour to capital punishment, and is generally well thought out and adjusted. However, in the case of juvenile criminals, it is often unclear which punishment is appropriate, what causes underage individuals to commit crimes, and what are the ways to prevent it. There are, however, numerous theories regarding these questions.
The most obvious and widely discussed factor leading to juvenile delinquency is the surroundings in which children grow up. If the environment is not suitable, not contributing to a child's moral and intellectual development, he or she may grow up with a lack of strong moral guidance. One of the main constraints holding an individual from committing crimes is not obedience to the law, but rather the moral, ethical, the immanent understanding of what is right and what is wrong; usually, this develops under the influence of parents and beneficial surroundings such as friends, authoritative social groups, and so on. However, if there is little-to-no positive influence, children tend to develop moral poverty: the incapacity to control their behaviours guided by the aforementioned skills and principles.
Although the majority of sociologists and criminologists agree on the importance of the environment in which an individual grows up, there are more debated impacts causing juvenile delinquency. One of them is the influence of video games and other media such as music or TV programmes. It is true that contemporary media is filled with violence, sexual content, exploitation, and stereotypes. But it is doubtful that it can cause a mentally and morally healthy child from a normal family to cross the line and commit a crime.
What can, however, cause a morally stable juvenile to commit a crime is drugs. It becomes clear that in order to prevent or decrease juvenile delinquency, it is not enough to encourage parents to simply establish a stricter control over their children - doing so would be shifting responsibility from the whole society to its separate members. What parents can do, however, is try to keep their children away from dangerous substances; it is important to remember that although a teenager cannot be helped from rebelling (since this process is natural and caused by both mental and hormonal factors), he or she can be at least guided towards a more healthy rebellion: for example, skateboarding or street art instead of smoking marijuana.

Q. Which of the following statements can be inferred from the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 4

According to the passage, 'If the environment is not suitable, not contributing to a child's moral and intellectual development, he or she may grow up with a lack of strong moral guidance. One of the main constraints holding an individual from committing crimes is not obedience to the law, but rather the moral, ethical, the immanent understanding of what is right and what is wrong; usually, this develops under the influence of parents and beneficial surroundings such as friends, authoritative social groups, and so on. However, if there is little-to-no positive influence, children tend to develop moral poverty: the incapacity to control their behaviours guided by the aforementioned skills and principles. Although the majority of sociologists and criminologists agree on the importance of the environment in which an individual grows up, there are more debated impacts causing juvenile delinquency.' Therefore, option 1 is the right answer.
The opposite of option 2 is asserted in the passage.
Option 3 says that parents are the only influence; whereas other influencing factors are also mentioned.
Option 4 is not correct as a differing opinion in expressed in the passage.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 5

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

When we are not actually holding them, books are things over which we like to wring our hands. They stand, in their very solidity, for what might be precarious and endangered in our brave newish world. Worries about the accelerated pace of everyday life, the diminution of attention spans, and the eroded boundary between work and leisure all animate—and get entangled in—the familiar lament over what Sven Birkerts called, in the subtitle of his 1994 book, the "fate of reading in an electronic age." We sense that we don't read quite the way we used to, and that it matters.
Against the backdrop of the current cultural complaints, Christina Lupton, who teaches English literature at the University of Warwick, turns her attention to England during roughly the second half of the 18th century in an effort to explore the relationship between reading books and spending time. This historical move is unsurprising, not only because that's where Lupton's scholarly and critical expertise lies but also because the era of Enlightenment in Western Europe has been the most frequent landing spot for book historians and media theorists looking for precedent dislocations of the written word that, today, are produced by electronic text transmission and the internet.
Rather, it is that she presents a set of exemplary readers and writers whose reflective encounters with books highlight the utility of the codex as a technique for thinking about time in its many meanings. The result is a vigorous and partially novel defense of the value of books and the humanities to a happy and meaningful life. Whether these approaches to books are aligned, competing, or loosely affiliated variations on the single theme of time seems open to debate. But Lupton links them all because they fly in the face of received wisdom about books and of ideologically dominant attitudes toward time use. Printed books, both their critics and their beleaguered defenders tend to agree, promote linear and sequential thinking by stabilizing, sequestering, and ordering their contents between their covers. Somewhat analogously, it is typical to describe modern time as linear, uniform, and homogeneous. Lupton encourages us to see both books and temporal experience differently. Rather than seeing time as a scarce, homogeneous resource to be economised or optimised, Lupton invites us to follow her in seeing books as things that introduce difference, discontinuity, and even plasticity into time itself.
Reading and the Making of Time says relatively little about two qualities of bound books that stand out in our age of screen reading: their heft and their suitability for display. The bulkiness and weight of books, from which Kindles and Nooks promise liberation, remain, for many readers, central to their talismanic potential, as do so many other tactile variables related to page texture or the flexibility of covers and binding.
Students entering my office sometimes inquire whether I've read all the thousands of books that line its walls. In the wake of Christina Lupton, I might expect them to ask whether I aspired to read all these books. But whether books represent our past experiences or our dreams for the future, the way we showcase and arrange them seems interesting in an age in which databases and search engines have eclipsed books as tools for looking things up. Displayed books gesture forward and backward to acts of reading and rereading; of purchasing, posing, moving, and unpacking; of passing time and dropping into its folds.

Q. The passage is primarily concerned with which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 5

The author reiterates that books are related to our past and our future and can be revisited multiple times differently. Therefore, option 3 is the right answer. Option 1 and 2 rather take a negative turn and focus on what is not the main idea of the text. Option 4 is incorrect because it incorrectly states that 'understanding multiple ways of time' is the main focus.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 6

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

When we are not actually holding them, books are things over which we like to wring our hands. They stand, in their very solidity, for what might be precarious and endangered in our brave newish world. Worries about the accelerated pace of everyday life, the diminution of attention spans, and the eroded boundary between work and leisure all animate—and get entangled in—the familiar lament over what Sven Birkerts called, in the subtitle of his 1994 book, the "fate of reading in an electronic age." We sense that we don't read quite the way we used to, and that it matters.
Against the backdrop of the current cultural complaints, Christina Lupton, who teaches English literature at the University of Warwick, turns her attention to England during roughly the second half of the 18th century in an effort to explore the relationship between reading books and spending time. This historical move is unsurprising, not only because that's where Lupton's scholarly and critical expertise lies but also because the era of Enlightenment in Western Europe has been the most frequent landing spot for book historians and media theorists looking for precedent dislocations of the written word that, today, are produced by electronic text transmission and the internet.
Rather, it is that she presents a set of exemplary readers and writers whose reflective encounters with books highlight the utility of the codex as a technique for thinking about time in its many meanings. The result is a vigorous and partially novel defense of the value of books and the humanities to a happy and meaningful life. Whether these approaches to books are aligned, competing, or loosely affiliated variations on the single theme of time seems open to debate. But Lupton links them all because they fly in the face of received wisdom about books and of ideologically dominant attitudes toward time use. Printed books, both their critics and their beleaguered defenders tend to agree, promote linear and sequential thinking by stabilizing, sequestering, and ordering their contents between their covers. Somewhat analogously, it is typical to describe modern time as linear, uniform, and homogeneous. Lupton encourages us to see both books and temporal experience differently. Rather than seeing time as a scarce, homogeneous resource to be economised or optimised, Lupton invites us to follow her in seeing books as things that introduce difference, discontinuity, and even plasticity into time itself.
Reading and the Making of Time says relatively little about two qualities of bound books that stand out in our age of screen reading: their heft and their suitability for display. The bulkiness and weight of books, from which Kindles and Nooks promise liberation, remain, for many readers, central to their talismanic potential, as do so many other tactile variables related to page texture or the flexibility of covers and binding.
Students entering my office sometimes inquire whether I've read all the thousands of books that line its walls. In the wake of Christina Lupton, I might expect them to ask whether I aspired to read all these books. But whether books represent our past experiences or our dreams for the future, the way we showcase and arrange them seems interesting in an age in which databases and search engines have eclipsed books as tools for looking things up. Displayed books gesture forward and backward to acts of reading and rereading; of purchasing, posing, moving, and unpacking; of passing time and dropping into its folds.

Q. Which of the following opinions does the author form from Lupton's work?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 6

According to the passage, 'Somewhat analogously, it is typical to describe modern time as linear, uniform, and homogeneous. Lupton encourages us to see both books and temporal experience differently. Rather than seeing time as a scarce, homogeneous resource to be economised or optimised, Lupton invites us to follow her in seeing books as things that introduce difference, discontinuity, and even plasticity into time itself.' This proves that option 4 is the right answer. Although option 3 is the opinion of the author, but not what he derives from Lupton's work. Option 1 and 2 are incorrect because these don't describe what the author thinks of Lupton's work.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 7

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

When we are not actually holding them, books are things over which we like to wring our hands. They stand, in their very solidity, for what might be precarious and endangered in our brave newish world. Worries about the accelerated pace of everyday life, the diminution of attention spans, and the eroded boundary between work and leisure all animate—and get entangled in—the familiar lament over what Sven Birkerts called, in the subtitle of his 1994 book, the "fate of reading in an electronic age." We sense that we don't read quite the way we used to, and that it matters.
Against the backdrop of the current cultural complaints, Christina Lupton, who teaches English literature at the University of Warwick, turns her attention to England during roughly the second half of the 18th century in an effort to explore the relationship between reading books and spending time. This historical move is unsurprising, not only because that's where Lupton's scholarly and critical expertise lies but also because the era of Enlightenment in Western Europe has been the most frequent landing spot for book historians and media theorists looking for precedent dislocations of the written word that, today, are produced by electronic text transmission and the internet.
Rather, it is that she presents a set of exemplary readers and writers whose reflective encounters with books highlight the utility of the codex as a technique for thinking about time in its many meanings. The result is a vigorous and partially novel defense of the value of books and the humanities to a happy and meaningful life. Whether these approaches to books are aligned, competing, or loosely affiliated variations on the single theme of time seems open to debate. But Lupton links them all because they fly in the face of received wisdom about books and of ideologically dominant attitudes toward time use. Printed books, both their critics and their beleaguered defenders tend to agree, promote linear and sequential thinking by stabilizing, sequestering, and ordering their contents between their covers. Somewhat analogously, it is typical to describe modern time as linear, uniform, and homogeneous. Lupton encourages us to see both books and temporal experience differently. Rather than seeing time as a scarce, homogeneous resource to be economised or optimised, Lupton invites us to follow her in seeing books as things that introduce difference, discontinuity, and even plasticity into time itself.
Reading and the Making of Time says relatively little about two qualities of bound books that stand out in our age of screen reading: their heft and their suitability for display. The bulkiness and weight of books, from which Kindles and Nooks promise liberation, remain, for many readers, central to their talismanic potential, as do so many other tactile variables related to page texture or the flexibility of covers and binding.
Students entering my office sometimes inquire whether I've read all the thousands of books that line its walls. In the wake of Christina Lupton, I might expect them to ask whether I aspired to read all these books. But whether books represent our past experiences or our dreams for the future, the way we showcase and arrange them seems interesting in an age in which databases and search engines have eclipsed books as tools for looking things up. Displayed books gesture forward and backward to acts of reading and rereading; of purchasing, posing, moving, and unpacking; of passing time and dropping into its folds.

Q. The author quotes the example of his office in order to describe

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 7

According to the passage, 'But whether books represent our past experiences or our dreams for the future, the way we showcase and arrange them seems interesting in an age in which databases and search engines have eclipsed books as tools for looking things up. Displayed books gesture forward and backward to acts of reading and rereading; of purchasing, posing, moving, and unpacking; of passing time and dropping into its folds.' This proves that option 1 is the right answer.
Although the author states what is given in option 2, it is not what the author tends to point towards through the use of example of his office. Option 3 is incorrect because it takes the meaning too literally. The author states it as a question that he would like to be asked or the perception that he would like his students to develop - not keeping books down after just one read. Option 4 is incorrect because it is neither implied in the text nor what the author intends to explain through the example of his office.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 8

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

When we are not actually holding them, books are things over which we like to wring our hands. They stand, in their very solidity, for what might be precarious and endangered in our brave newish world. Worries about the accelerated pace of everyday life, the diminution of attention spans, and the eroded boundary between work and leisure all animate—and get entangled in—the familiar lament over what Sven Birkerts called, in the subtitle of his 1994 book, the "fate of reading in an electronic age." We sense that we don't read quite the way we used to, and that it matters.
Against the backdrop of the current cultural complaints, Christina Lupton, who teaches English literature at the University of Warwick, turns her attention to England during roughly the second half of the 18th century in an effort to explore the relationship between reading books and spending time. This historical move is unsurprising, not only because that's where Lupton's scholarly and critical expertise lies but also because the era of Enlightenment in Western Europe has been the most frequent landing spot for book historians and media theorists looking for precedent dislocations of the written word that, today, are produced by electronic text transmission and the internet.
Rather, it is that she presents a set of exemplary readers and writers whose reflective encounters with books highlight the utility of the codex as a technique for thinking about time in its many meanings. The result is a vigorous and partially novel defense of the value of books and the humanities to a happy and meaningful life. Whether these approaches to books are aligned, competing, or loosely affiliated variations on the single theme of time seems open to debate. But Lupton links them all because they fly in the face of received wisdom about books and of ideologically dominant attitudes toward time use. Printed books, both their critics and their beleaguered defenders tend to agree, promote linear and sequential thinking by stabilizing, sequestering, and ordering their contents between their covers. Somewhat analogously, it is typical to describe modern time as linear, uniform, and homogeneous. Lupton encourages us to see both books and temporal experience differently. Rather than seeing time as a scarce, homogeneous resource to be economised or optimised, Lupton invites us to follow her in seeing books as things that introduce difference, discontinuity, and even plasticity into time itself.
Reading and the Making of Time says relatively little about two qualities of bound books that stand out in our age of screen reading: their heft and their suitability for display. The bulkiness and weight of books, from which Kindles and Nooks promise liberation, remain, for many readers, central to their talismanic potential, as do so many other tactile variables related to page texture or the flexibility of covers and binding.
Students entering my office sometimes inquire whether I've read all the thousands of books that line its walls. In the wake of Christina Lupton, I might expect them to ask whether I aspired to read all these books. But whether books represent our past experiences or our dreams for the future, the way we showcase and arrange them seems interesting in an age in which databases and search engines have eclipsed books as tools for looking things up. Displayed books gesture forward and backward to acts of reading and rereading; of purchasing, posing, moving, and unpacking; of passing time and dropping into its folds.

Q. The author is most likely to agree with which of the following?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 8

According to the passage, 'Worries about the accelerated pace of everyday life, the diminution of attention spans, and the eroded boundary between work and leisure all animate - and get entangled in - the familiar lament over what Sven Birkerts called, in the subtitle of his 1994 book, "the fate of reading in an electronic age."' This shows that option 4 is the right answer.
Option 1 is incorrect because the author does not state this in the text. Option 2 is incorrect because the author describes this as a typical view and not what his understanding from the views of Lupton teaches us. Option 3 is incorrect because the author states that the Lupton's book describes very less about the thickness and the looks of the book. He does not state whether he agrees with it or not.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 9

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The young scientist in India is an endangered species. The threat comes from the predatory habits of a more evolved species that is the senior scientist. An Indian university teacher in a letter to the international science journal Nature wrote plaintively: ''Thesis supervisors take undue credit for the work of their protégés''. A young scientist needs the goodwill and support of the scientist-in-power at every step: for completion and continuation of his work, for participation in national and international meetings and research projects, for recognition and reward and for promotion. This support is available but at a price. The price often is the sharing of credit. A worthwhile research paper or a project originating from a humble scientist would often end up with the scientist-in-power as the principal author or investigator.

The power of the senior scientist over his junior stems from the fact that science is the only profession in the world which is self-assessing. Unlike in the bureaucracy or the military where the top authority vests with non-professionals, a scientist's work can be overseen and evaluated only by fellow scientists.

Fortunately for the scientists, support for science is a badge of honour for nations aspiring to modernity. That is why the government which normally would not pay the piper unless it can call the tune, happily makes an exception in the case of science. Society values continuity, stability and security, and turns to the past for guidance and support. Science, on the other hand, aspires to instability. It aims at creating something that did not exist before. It seeks a break with the past with an eye on the future.

It is an irony that in today's world, feudalism can be sustained only in the administration of a modern scientific research centre. One must, however, not be unfair to the feudal lords of yesteryears whose conduct had the sanction of the times. Neo-feudalism is pernicious because it is anachronistic; it can be sustained only by a subversion of the system in the hands of the people who are entrusted with the task of upholding it.

If we define professionalism as the realisation that an institution ranks higher than an individual and that the collective goal is more important than individual ego, it must be admitted that we are unprofessional people. It is wrong in principle to give any individual a larger-than-the-institution image. This philosophy becomes all the more debilitating, because recently there has been an alarming decline in the quality of leadership in science as in other walks of life. It is relatively speaking an easy matter to evaluate a leader. His commitment can be judged by asking whether he is giving to the system or taking from it. The calibre of a leader can be gauged from the calibre of the people willing to play second fiddle to him.

Under these circumstances, if a chief executive is to be projected as the master of an institution rather than its servant, this can be done only by degrading the institution. It will be like a cinema hall whose facade remains the same, but the posters outside and the picture inside go on changing.

Q. The fundamental flaw with the Indian scientific system is that

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 9

1. Incorrect. This is too simplistic, one-sided and overstated opinion.
2. Incorrect. This sweeps all the scientists, the beginners and the bosses, under the carpet. And it is not the bonded mindset of the junior, but the mindset of the senior to treat the junior as one.
3. Incorrect. The option does not relate with the question at all.
4. Correct. This can be inferred from the lines: '...it must be admitted that we are unprofessional people. It is wrong in principle to give any individual a larger-than-the-institution image.' Option 4 is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 10

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The young scientist in India is an endangered species. The threat comes from the predatory habits of a more evolved species that is the senior scientist. An Indian university teacher in a letter to the international science journal Nature wrote plaintively: ''Thesis supervisors take undue credit for the work of their protégés''. A young scientist needs the goodwill and support of the scientist-in-power at every step: for completion and continuation of his work, for participation in national and international meetings and research projects, for recognition and reward and for promotion. This support is available but at a price. The price often is the sharing of credit. A worthwhile research paper or a project originating from a humble scientist would often end up with the scientist-in-power as the principal author or investigator.

The power of the senior scientist over his junior stems from the fact that science is the only profession in the world which is self-assessing. Unlike in the bureaucracy or the military where the top authority vests with non-professionals, a scientist's work can be overseen and evaluated only by fellow scientists.

Fortunately for the scientists, support for science is a badge of honour for nations aspiring to modernity. That is why the government which normally would not pay the piper unless it can call the tune, happily makes an exception in the case of science. Society values continuity, stability and security, and turns to the past for guidance and support. Science, on the other hand, aspires to instability. It aims at creating something that did not exist before. It seeks a break with the past with an eye on the future.

It is an irony that in today's world, feudalism can be sustained only in the administration of a modern scientific research centre. One must, however, not be unfair to the feudal lords of yesteryears whose conduct had the sanction of the times. Neo-feudalism is pernicious because it is anachronistic; it can be sustained only by a subversion of the system in the hands of the people who are entrusted with the task of upholding it.

If we define professionalism as the realisation that an institution ranks higher than an individual and that the collective goal is more important than individual ego, it must be admitted that we are unprofessional people. It is wrong in principle to give any individual a larger-than-the-institution image. This philosophy becomes all the more debilitating, because recently there has been an alarming decline in the quality of leadership in science as in other walks of life. It is relatively speaking an easy matter to evaluate a leader. His commitment can be judged by asking whether he is giving to the system or taking from it. The calibre of a leader can be gauged from the calibre of the people willing to play second fiddle to him.

Under these circumstances, if a chief executive is to be projected as the master of an institution rather than its servant, this can be done only by degrading the institution. It will be like a cinema hall whose facade remains the same, but the posters outside and the picture inside go on changing.

Q. The government makes an exception in the case of science because

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 10

1. Incorrect. This is too general an option to state the reason for the exception.
2. Correct. This can be derived from the line: 'Fortunately for the scientists, support for science is a badge of honour for nations aspiring to modernity.'
3. Incorrect. This is too general an option to state the reason for the exception.
4. Incorrect. The problem is predominantly internal, not external.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 11

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The young scientist in India is an endangered species. The threat comes from the predatory habits of a more evolved species that is the senior scientist. An Indian university teacher in a letter to the international science journal Nature wrote plaintively: ''Thesis supervisors take undue credit for the work of their protégés''. A young scientist needs the goodwill and support of the scientist-in-power at every step: for completion and continuation of his work, for participation in national and international meetings and research projects, for recognition and reward and for promotion. This support is available but at a price. The price often is the sharing of credit. A worthwhile research paper or a project originating from a humble scientist would often end up with the scientist-in-power as the principal author or investigator.

The power of the senior scientist over his junior stems from the fact that science is the only profession in the world which is self-assessing. Unlike in the bureaucracy or the military where the top authority vests with non-professionals, a scientist's work can be overseen and evaluated only by fellow scientists.

Fortunately for the scientists, support for science is a badge of honour for nations aspiring to modernity. That is why the government which normally would not pay the piper unless it can call the tune, happily makes an exception in the case of science. Society values continuity, stability and security, and turns to the past for guidance and support. Science, on the other hand, aspires to instability. It aims at creating something that did not exist before. It seeks a break with the past with an eye on the future.

It is an irony that in today's world, feudalism can be sustained only in the administration of a modern scientific research centre. One must, however, not be unfair to the feudal lords of yesteryears whose conduct had the sanction of the times. Neo-feudalism is pernicious because it is anachronistic; it can be sustained only by a subversion of the system in the hands of the people who are entrusted with the task of upholding it.

If we define professionalism as the realisation that an institution ranks higher than an individual and that the collective goal is more important than individual ego, it must be admitted that we are unprofessional people. It is wrong in principle to give any individual a larger-than-the-institution image. This philosophy becomes all the more debilitating, because recently there has been an alarming decline in the quality of leadership in science as in other walks of life. It is relatively speaking an easy matter to evaluate a leader. His commitment can be judged by asking whether he is giving to the system or taking from it. The calibre of a leader can be gauged from the calibre of the people willing to play second fiddle to him.

Under these circumstances, if a chief executive is to be projected as the master of an institution rather than its servant, this can be done only by degrading the institution. It will be like a cinema hall whose facade remains the same, but the posters outside and the picture inside go on changing.

Q. The author suggests that the power which a senior scientist exercises over his juniors is due to

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 11

1. Incorrect. Feudal outlook in itself is not a source of power.
2. Incorrect. The difference in mentalities in itself is not a source of power.
3. Correct. This can be derived from the line: 'The power of the senior scientist over his junior stems from the fact that science is the only profession in the world which is self-assessing.'
4. Incorrect. Only option (3) can be derived as a reason.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 12

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

The young scientist in India is an endangered species. The threat comes from the predatory habits of a more evolved species that is the senior scientist. An Indian university teacher in a letter to the international science journal Nature wrote plaintively: ''Thesis supervisors take undue credit for the work of their protégés''. A young scientist needs the goodwill and support of the scientist-in-power at every step: for completion and continuation of his work, for participation in national and international meetings and research projects, for recognition and reward and for promotion. This support is available but at a price. The price often is the sharing of credit. A worthwhile research paper or a project originating from a humble scientist would often end up with the scientist-in-power as the principal author or investigator.

The power of the senior scientist over his junior stems from the fact that science is the only profession in the world which is self-assessing. Unlike in the bureaucracy or the military where the top authority vests with non-professionals, a scientist's work can be overseen and evaluated only by fellow scientists.

Fortunately for the scientists, support for science is a badge of honour for nations aspiring to modernity. That is why the government which normally would not pay the piper unless it can call the tune, happily makes an exception in the case of science. Society values continuity, stability and security, and turns to the past for guidance and support. Science, on the other hand, aspires to instability. It aims at creating something that did not exist before. It seeks a break with the past with an eye on the future.

It is an irony that in today's world, feudalism can be sustained only in the administration of a modern scientific research centre. One must, however, not be unfair to the feudal lords of yesteryears whose conduct had the sanction of the times. Neo-feudalism is pernicious because it is anachronistic; it can be sustained only by a subversion of the system in the hands of the people who are entrusted with the task of upholding it.

If we define professionalism as the realisation that an institution ranks higher than an individual and that the collective goal is more important than individual ego, it must be admitted that we are unprofessional people. It is wrong in principle to give any individual a larger-than-the-institution image. This philosophy becomes all the more debilitating, because recently there has been an alarming decline in the quality of leadership in science as in other walks of life. It is relatively speaking an easy matter to evaluate a leader. His commitment can be judged by asking whether he is giving to the system or taking from it. The calibre of a leader can be gauged from the calibre of the people willing to play second fiddle to him.

Under these circumstances, if a chief executive is to be projected as the master of an institution rather than its servant, this can be done only by degrading the institution. It will be like a cinema hall whose facade remains the same, but the posters outside and the picture inside go on changing.

Q. The author calls ''neo-feudalism'' pernicious because

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 12

1. Correct. The passage states, "Neo-feudalism is pernicious because it is anachronistic; it can be sustained only by a subversion of the system in the hands of the people who are entrusted with the task of upholding it." The next few lines state that an Indian scientist is comfortable among his protégés and mentors and not among peers. This feudal system as described is non-professional and harms or destroys the system. Thus, option 1 is the correct answer.
2. Incorrect. This option paints the feudal lords in a negative light while the text states "One must, however, not be unfair to the feudal lords of yesteryears whose conduct had the sanction of the times." Hence, incorrect.
3. Incorrect. Although true, this is not stated as the reason in the passage why 'neo-feudalism' is pernicious.
4. Incorrect. This is not the reason that the author terms neo-feudalism as 'pernicious' in the passage.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 13

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question.

There is a history of intimate links between the study of dreams and the US advertising industry. Sigmund Freud's nephew Edward Bernays is credited with pioneering the US public relations and advertising industries, in part through influential books such as Propaganda (1928). It was Freud's theories, which examined the nature of dreams and the unconscious, that Bernays took as inspiration for his approaches to influencing the public, with a focus on the creation of unconscious desires and associations. In a series of hugely successful advertising campaigns, Bernays demonstrated that the irrational forces that drive human behaviour could be harnessed to 'engineer consent' and manipulate people's behaviour without their realising it. It is psychoanalysis that gave advertising the idea to sell by association, linking cars and masculinity or cigarettes and freedom, just as the Coors dream-incubation project linked beer with positive, refreshing experiences.
Bernays inspired a wave of advertising industry leaders in the ensuing decades to hire 'motivational analysts' and 'depth manipulators', who sought to uncover and redirect the unconscious desires of consumers. The use of subliminal stimuli, first explored in perception and attention laboratories, seemed well suited to their purposes. Research suggested subliminal stimuli might be able to deliver messaging below a person's perceptual threshold, allowing for the undetected insertion of new motivations and meaningful associations in vulnerable viewers.
In 1957, a press conference from the market researcher James Vicary – claiming that flashing the phrases 'Eat popcorn' and 'Drink Coca-Cola' during a film significantly increased the sale of these products – hit a raw nerve. Claims about the potential of subliminal messaging smacked of manipulation by a Communist state broadcast. A demonstration of subliminal advertising was demanded and held for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and members of Congress, where 'Eat popcorn' was flashed at the attendees during a TV programme. But the response was mild: one senator reportedly quipped 'I think I want a hot dog,' and it seems that nobody was overcome with a desire for popcorn.
It's not surprising that the audience was unmoved; the evidence for large behavioural effects caused by subliminal advertising was, and remains, quite weak. By his own admission (five years after the fact), Vicary had faked his study. Nevertheless, the FCC has stated that: 'Regardless of whether it is effective, the broadcast of subliminal material is inconsistent with a station's obligation to serve the public interest because it is designed to be deceptive.' In the view of the regulatory body, a message that seeks to circumvent the awareness of a listener to influence them without their being able to assess it is, by nature, deceptive. More generally, the Federal Trade Commission, which has the power to regulate all advertising, has concluded that: 'It would be deceptive for marketers to embed ads with so-called subliminal messages that could affect consumer behaviour,' making it a prohibited form of advertising. But no extension of these prohibitions to dream hacking has been made, and the advertising industry must be aware of this lack.

Q. All of the following statements can be inferred about 'engineer[ing] consent' as mentioned in the first paragraph EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 13

1. Incorrect. Engineered consent depends on appealing to implicit needs and wants of people through advertising in order to generate their consent without them even realizing it.
2. Incorrect. The greater someone associates with his or her wants, the greater are the chances of such person providing engineered consent.
3. Incorrect. Since association leads to satisfaction of needs through products, absence of such association would make it harder to manipulate people.
4. Correct. Nothing can be inferred with respect to how eager a person is to be manipulated. In fact, they are not willing to be manipulated at all. That is the reason such manipulation is not explicit.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 14

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question.

There is a history of intimate links between the study of dreams and the US advertising industry. Sigmund Freud's nephew Edward Bernays is credited with pioneering the US public relations and advertising industries, in part through influential books such as Propaganda (1928). It was Freud's theories, which examined the nature of dreams and the unconscious, that Bernays took as inspiration for his approaches to influencing the public, with a focus on the creation of unconscious desires and associations. In a series of hugely successful advertising campaigns, Bernays demonstrated that the irrational forces that drive human behaviour could be harnessed to 'engineer consent' and manipulate people's behaviour without their realising it. It is psychoanalysis that gave advertising the idea to sell by association, linking cars and masculinity or cigarettes and freedom, just as the Coors dream-incubation project linked beer with positive, refreshing experiences.
Bernays inspired a wave of advertising industry leaders in the ensuing decades to hire 'motivational analysts' and 'depth manipulators', who sought to uncover and redirect the unconscious desires of consumers. The use of subliminal stimuli, first explored in perception and attention laboratories, seemed well suited to their purposes. Research suggested subliminal stimuli might be able to deliver messaging below a person's perceptual threshold, allowing for the undetected insertion of new motivations and meaningful associations in vulnerable viewers.
In 1957, a press conference from the market researcher James Vicary – claiming that flashing the phrases 'Eat popcorn' and 'Drink Coca-Cola' during a film significantly increased the sale of these products – hit a raw nerve. Claims about the potential of subliminal messaging smacked of manipulation by a Communist state broadcast. A demonstration of subliminal advertising was demanded and held for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and members of Congress, where 'Eat popcorn' was flashed at the attendees during a TV programme. But the response was mild: one senator reportedly quipped 'I think I want a hot dog,' and it seems that nobody was overcome with a desire for popcorn.
It's not surprising that the audience was unmoved; the evidence for large behavioural effects caused by subliminal advertising was, and remains, quite weak. By his own admission (five years after the fact), Vicary had faked his study. Nevertheless, the FCC has stated that: 'Regardless of whether it is effective, the broadcast of subliminal material is inconsistent with a station's obligation to serve the public interest because it is designed to be deceptive.' In the view of the regulatory body, a message that seeks to circumvent the awareness of a listener to influence them without their being able to assess it is, by nature, deceptive. More generally, the Federal Trade Commission, which has the power to regulate all advertising, has concluded that: 'It would be deceptive for marketers to embed ads with so-called subliminal messages that could affect consumer behaviour,' making it a prohibited form of advertising. But no extension of these prohibitions to dream hacking has been made, and the advertising industry must be aware of this lack.

Q. Which of the following does the author imply when he mentions the importance of delivering a message 'below a person's perceptual threshold' in the second paragraph?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 14

The importance of delivering such message below a person's perceptual threshold is to generate consent unconsciously. People are not willing to otherwise being manipulated. When an intended message is inserted below the consumers' perceptual threshold, the consumers are not fully able to comprehend it but feel that their consent is necessary to satisfy their wants.

Option 1: This is not inferable. No such comparison between explicit advertising or implicit marketing is being made.
Option 3: Nothing can be inferred about the relative effectiveness of subliminal stimulus under different situations. Although helpful, such low threshold cannot be inferred as most effective.
Option 4: Nothing can be inferred in this regard.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 15

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question.

There is a history of intimate links between the study of dreams and the US advertising industry. Sigmund Freud's nephew Edward Bernays is credited with pioneering the US public relations and advertising industries, in part through influential books such as Propaganda (1928). It was Freud's theories, which examined the nature of dreams and the unconscious, that Bernays took as inspiration for his approaches to influencing the public, with a focus on the creation of unconscious desires and associations. In a series of hugely successful advertising campaigns, Bernays demonstrated that the irrational forces that drive human behaviour could be harnessed to 'engineer consent' and manipulate people's behaviour without their realising it. It is psychoanalysis that gave advertising the idea to sell by association, linking cars and masculinity or cigarettes and freedom, just as the Coors dream-incubation project linked beer with positive, refreshing experiences.
Bernays inspired a wave of advertising industry leaders in the ensuing decades to hire 'motivational analysts' and 'depth manipulators', who sought to uncover and redirect the unconscious desires of consumers. The use of subliminal stimuli, first explored in perception and attention laboratories, seemed well suited to their purposes. Research suggested subliminal stimuli might be able to deliver messaging below a person's perceptual threshold, allowing for the undetected insertion of new motivations and meaningful associations in vulnerable viewers.
In 1957, a press conference from the market researcher James Vicary – claiming that flashing the phrases 'Eat popcorn' and 'Drink Coca-Cola' during a film significantly increased the sale of these products – hit a raw nerve. Claims about the potential of subliminal messaging smacked of manipulation by a Communist state broadcast. A demonstration of subliminal advertising was demanded and held for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and members of Congress, where 'Eat popcorn' was flashed at the attendees during a TV programme. But the response was mild: one senator reportedly quipped 'I think I want a hot dog,' and it seems that nobody was overcome with a desire for popcorn.
It's not surprising that the audience was unmoved; the evidence for large behavioural effects caused by subliminal advertising was, and remains, quite weak. By his own admission (five years after the fact), Vicary had faked his study. Nevertheless, the FCC has stated that: 'Regardless of whether it is effective, the broadcast of subliminal material is inconsistent with a station's obligation to serve the public interest because it is designed to be deceptive.' In the view of the regulatory body, a message that seeks to circumvent the awareness of a listener to influence them without their being able to assess it is, by nature, deceptive. More generally, the Federal Trade Commission, which has the power to regulate all advertising, has concluded that: 'It would be deceptive for marketers to embed ads with so-called subliminal messages that could affect consumer behaviour,' making it a prohibited form of advertising. But no extension of these prohibitions to dream hacking has been made, and the advertising industry must be aware of this lack.

Q. According to the passage, why did James Vicary's claim about the effectiveness of subliminal advertising 'hit a raw nerve'?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 15

'Hit a raw nerve' is to provoke a reaction. Here, the text states that the government came into action when they heard the market researcher claiming the effects of subliminal messaging. The government perceived it as 'manipulation by a Communist state broadcast'.

Option 1: No such inference can be made. People were indeed able to comprehend the effectiveness of such strategy, which eventually led to inquiries into such advertising strategy.
Option 2: '...subliminal advertising was seen as "a threat" to the dominance of traditional advertising industry' makes this option incorrect.
Option 3: This is the best possible inference as the passage mentions about the fear of manipulation by a Communist state broadcast and also that demonstrations were held for FCC and the Congress. The last paragraph also talks about the steps taken by FCC in this regard.
Option 4: Such different results occurred afterwards when an enquiry into the effectiveness of subliminal advertising was made. It was not the cause of hitting the nerve, but an effect.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 16

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the given question.

There is a history of intimate links between the study of dreams and the US advertising industry. Sigmund Freud's nephew Edward Bernays is credited with pioneering the US public relations and advertising industries, in part through influential books such as Propaganda (1928). It was Freud's theories, which examined the nature of dreams and the unconscious, that Bernays took as inspiration for his approaches to influencing the public, with a focus on the creation of unconscious desires and associations. In a series of hugely successful advertising campaigns, Bernays demonstrated that the irrational forces that drive human behaviour could be harnessed to 'engineer consent' and manipulate people's behaviour without their realising it. It is psychoanalysis that gave advertising the idea to sell by association, linking cars and masculinity or cigarettes and freedom, just as the Coors dream-incubation project linked beer with positive, refreshing experiences.
Bernays inspired a wave of advertising industry leaders in the ensuing decades to hire 'motivational analysts' and 'depth manipulators', who sought to uncover and redirect the unconscious desires of consumers. The use of subliminal stimuli, first explored in perception and attention laboratories, seemed well suited to their purposes. Research suggested subliminal stimuli might be able to deliver messaging below a person's perceptual threshold, allowing for the undetected insertion of new motivations and meaningful associations in vulnerable viewers.
In 1957, a press conference from the market researcher James Vicary – claiming that flashing the phrases 'Eat popcorn' and 'Drink Coca-Cola' during a film significantly increased the sale of these products – hit a raw nerve. Claims about the potential of subliminal messaging smacked of manipulation by a Communist state broadcast. A demonstration of subliminal advertising was demanded and held for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and members of Congress, where 'Eat popcorn' was flashed at the attendees during a TV programme. But the response was mild: one senator reportedly quipped 'I think I want a hot dog,' and it seems that nobody was overcome with a desire for popcorn.
It's not surprising that the audience was unmoved; the evidence for large behavioural effects caused by subliminal advertising was, and remains, quite weak. By his own admission (five years after the fact), Vicary had faked his study. Nevertheless, the FCC has stated that: 'Regardless of whether it is effective, the broadcast of subliminal material is inconsistent with a station's obligation to serve the public interest because it is designed to be deceptive.' In the view of the regulatory body, a message that seeks to circumvent the awareness of a listener to influence them without their being able to assess it is, by nature, deceptive. More generally, the Federal Trade Commission, which has the power to regulate all advertising, has concluded that: 'It would be deceptive for marketers to embed ads with so-called subliminal messages that could affect consumer behaviour,' making it a prohibited form of advertising. But no extension of these prohibitions to dream hacking has been made, and the advertising industry must be aware of this lack.

Q. "But no extension of these prohibitions to dream hacking has been made, and the advertising industry must be aware of this lack."
All of the following is implied in this last line of the passage EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 16

Option 1: Dream hacking has been mentioned as another way which marketers could use to influence the subconscious of the people.
Option 2: The mention of dream hacking as something that advertisers should know makes us infer its usability as an alternative subliminal advertising. It may be similar or even more effective in tapping into the unconscious, justifying why the author mentions it.
Option 3: This is the essence of dream hacking being mentioned as an alternative way.
Option 4: All of the above can be inferred from the passage. Hence, none of the options listed here will be the answer.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 17

Directions: The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, 4) given below, when properly sequenced would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequence of the order of the sentences and key in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer.

1. Literary works such as Byron's Darkness, Percy Shelley's Mont Blanc, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein reveal anxieties about human vulnerability to environmental change even as they address our power to manipulate our environments.

2. Historical texts reflect the changing climatic conditions that produced them.

3. This was caused largely by the massive eruption of the Indonesian volcano Mount Tambora the previous year, which lowered global temperatures and led to harvest failures and famine.

4. When Byron and the Shelleys stayed on the shores of Lake Geneva in 1816, the literature that they wrote responded to the wild weather of the year without a summer.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 17

The correct sequence is 2143.
Sentence 2 is the best introductory sentence as it introduces the idea of relation between historical texts and climate change. This is further followed by sentence 1 which provides the examples of such historical texts. The next sentence is 4 as it talks about the authors and the literature they wrote that were first mentioned in 1. Sentence 3 further explains what caused the 'wild weather' that was mentioned in 4.

CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 18

Directions: There is a sentence that is missing in the paragraph below. Look at the paragraph and decide in which blank (option 1, 2, 3, or 4) the following sentence would best fit.

Sentence: The aesthetic realm sits, rather, askance to politics; it allows us to attend to politics but relieves us from the weight of taking on a political position.

Paragraph: Art, perhaps uniquely among the forms of political discourse available to us, allows for audiences to contemplate issues at the heart of political clashes, while temporarily suspending the judgment of right and wrong. ___(1)___. The space of aesthetics is therefore neither fully political nor anti-political. ___(2)___. None of this is to suggest, of course, that this aesthetic, inconclusive mode is better than either objectivity or activism. ___(3)___. Instead, the suggestion is that the democratic public sphere requires a plurality of these different modes of discourse, among which the arts play their distinctive role. ___(4)___.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 18

The given sentence best fits blank 2. The sentence preceding blank 2 states that the space of aesthetics is neither fully political not anti-political. The given statement then elaborates this view by explaining 'why' the author regards the space of aesthetics as neither fully political nor anti-political. In the line following the blank, 'this inconclusive mode' specifically refers to the nature of aesthetics described in the previous statements. Option 3 is incorrect as both the following and the preceding statements connect without the blank. 'These different modes' refer to 'objectivity or activism' in the previous statement. The statement also does not fit as the conclusion of the passage (blank 4). Blank 1 is also misplaced, as the statement following the blank serves as a deduction made from the statement preceding the blank. Thus, the gap is redundant.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Mock Test - 13 - Question 19