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CAT Mock Test - 14 - CAT MCQ


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66 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2024 - CAT Mock Test - 14

CAT Mock Test - 14 for CAT 2024 is part of CAT Mock Test Series 2024 preparation. The CAT Mock Test - 14 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The CAT Mock Test - 14 MCQs are made for CAT 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for CAT Mock Test - 14 below.
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CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 1

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Professor Amartya Sen, the eminent economist and the Noble Laureate in Economics (1998), in his espoused theory of welfare economy, emphasized that in many underdeveloped countries like India, the state should play an important and increasingly varied role of economic development today. There are four general arguments, all of them related, for state participation in economic development. First, the entrance requirements in terms of financial capital and capital equipment are very large in certain industries, and the size of these obstacles will serve as barriers to entry on the part of private investors. One can imagine that these obstacles are imposing in industries such as steel production, automobiles, electronics, and parts of the textile industry. In addition, there are what Myint calls technical indivisibilities in social overhead capital. Public utilities, transport, communication and other infra-structural facilities must be in place before industrial development can occur, and they do not lend themselves to small-scale improvements.
A related argument centers on the demand side of economy. This economy is seen as fragmented, disconnected, and incapable of inputs from other parts of the economy. Consequently, economic activity in one part of the economy does not generate the dynamism in other sectors that is expected in more cohesive economics. Industrialization necessarily involves many different sectors; economic enterprises will thrive best in an environment in which they draw on inputs from related economic sectors and, in turn, release their own goods for industrial utilization within their own economics.
A third argument concerns the low-level equilibrium trap in which less developed countries find themselves. At subsistence levels, societies consume exactly what they produce. There is no remaining surplus for investment. As per-capita income rises, however the additional income will not be used for savings and investment. Instead, it will have the effect of increasing the population that will eat up the surplus and force the society to its former subsistence position. Fortunately, after a certain point, the rate of population growth will decrease; economic growth will intersect with and eventually outstrip population growth. The private sector, however, will not be able to provide the one-shot large dose of capital to push economic growth beyond those levels where population increases eat up the incremental advances.
The final argument concerns the relationship between delayed development and the state. Countries wishing to industrialize today have more competitors, and these competitors occupy a more differentiated industrial terrain than previously. This means that the available niches in the international system are more limited. For today's industrializers, therefore, the process of industrialization cannot be a haphazard affair, nor can the pace, content, direction be left solely to market forces. Part of the reason for a strong state presence, then, relates specifically to the competitive international environment in which modern countries and firms must operate.

Q. Which of the following best states the central point of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 1

The passage mentions that the state plays an important and increasingly varied role in the economic development of an underdeveloped economy. Also the importance of the role of state is discussed in all of the arguments put forward in the passage. Option 3 also describes the role of state. Thus, option 3 is the correct answer.
Option 1 is incorrect because the whole passage is not a pessimistic take on lack of economic growth in less developed countries. It suggests how it can get out of the "cycle of low production and demand". Option 2 is incorrect because the text suggests the opposite when it states "There are four general arguments, all of them related, for state participation in economic development." Option 4 is incorrect because what is required is not "outside assistance" but "state assistance".

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 2

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Professor Amartya Sen, the eminent economist and the Noble Laureate in Economics (1998), in his espoused theory of welfare economy, emphasized that in many underdeveloped countries like India, the state should play an important and increasingly varied role of economic development today. There are four general arguments, all of them related, for state participation in economic development. First, the entrance requirements in terms of financial capital and capital equipment are very large in certain industries, and the size of these obstacles will serve as barriers to entry on the part of private investors. One can imagine that these obstacles are imposing in industries such as steel production, automobiles, electronics, and parts of the textile industry. In addition, there are what Myint calls technical indivisibilities in social overhead capital. Public utilities, transport, communication and other infra-structural facilities must be in place before industrial development can occur, and they do not lend themselves to small-scale improvements.
A related argument centers on the demand side of economy. This economy is seen as fragmented, disconnected, and incapable of inputs from other parts of the economy. Consequently, economic activity in one part of the economy does not generate the dynamism in other sectors that is expected in more cohesive economics. Industrialization necessarily involves many different sectors; economic enterprises will thrive best in an environment in which they draw on inputs from related economic sectors and, in turn, release their own goods for industrial utilization within their own economics.
A third argument concerns the low-level equilibrium trap in which less developed countries find themselves. At subsistence levels, societies consume exactly what they produce. There is no remaining surplus for investment. As per-capita income rises, however the additional income will not be used for savings and investment. Instead, it will have the effect of increasing the population that will eat up the surplus and force the society to its former subsistence position. Fortunately, after a certain point, the rate of population growth will decrease; economic growth will intersect with and eventually outstrip population growth. The private sector, however, will not be able to provide the one-shot large dose of capital to push economic growth beyond those levels where population increases eat up the incremental advances.
The final argument concerns the relationship between delayed development and the state. Countries wishing to industrialize today have more competitors, and these competitors occupy a more differentiated industrial terrain than previously. This means that the available niches in the international system are more limited. For today's industrializers, therefore, the process of industrialization cannot be a haphazard affair, nor can the pace, content, direction be left solely to market forces. Part of the reason for a strong state presence, then, relates specifically to the competitive international environment in which modern countries and firms must operate.

Q. Which of the following, if true, would cast doubt on the author's argument that state participation is important in launching large-scale industries?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 2

Option 4, if true, would cast a doubt on the author's argument. It would contradict the author's argument that these industries do not lend themselves to small scale improvement.
Option 2 on the other hand supports the author's view that the private sector is incapable of fulfilling the large capital needs of the economy.
Option 3 is irrelevant and therefore incorrect.

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CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 3

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Professor Amartya Sen, the eminent economist and the Noble Laureate in Economics (1998), in his espoused theory of welfare economy, emphasized that in many underdeveloped countries like India, the state should play an important and increasingly varied role of economic development today. There are four general arguments, all of them related, for state participation in economic development. First, the entrance requirements in terms of financial capital and capital equipment are very large in certain industries, and the size of these obstacles will serve as barriers to entry on the part of private investors. One can imagine that these obstacles are imposing in industries such as steel production, automobiles, electronics, and parts of the textile industry. In addition, there are what Myint calls technical indivisibilities in social overhead capital. Public utilities, transport, communication and other infra-structural facilities must be in place before industrial development can occur, and they do not lend themselves to small-scale improvements.
A related argument centers on the demand side of economy. This economy is seen as fragmented, disconnected, and incapable of inputs from other parts of the economy. Consequently, economic activity in one part of the economy does not generate the dynamism in other sectors that is expected in more cohesive economics. Industrialization necessarily involves many different sectors; economic enterprises will thrive best in an environment in which they draw on inputs from related economic sectors and, in turn, release their own goods for industrial utilization within their own economics.
A third argument concerns the low-level equilibrium trap in which less developed countries find themselves. At subsistence levels, societies consume exactly what they produce. There is no remaining surplus for investment. As per-capita income rises, however the additional income will not be used for savings and investment. Instead, it will have the effect of increasing the population that will eat up the surplus and force the society to its former subsistence position. Fortunately, after a certain point, the rate of population growth will decrease; economic growth will intersect with and eventually outstrip population growth. The private sector, however, will not be able to provide the one-shot large dose of capital to push economic growth beyond those levels where population increases eat up the incremental advances.
The final argument concerns the relationship between delayed development and the state. Countries wishing to industrialize today have more competitors, and these competitors occupy a more differentiated industrial terrain than previously. This means that the available niches in the international system are more limited. For today's industrializers, therefore, the process of industrialization cannot be a haphazard affair, nor can the pace, content, direction be left solely to market forces. Part of the reason for a strong state presence, then, relates specifically to the competitive international environment in which modern countries and firms must operate.

Q. The author suggests all of the following as appropriate roles for the state in economic development EXCEPT:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 3

Option 2 can be inferred from the first argument, option 3 can be inferred from the third argument and option 4 can be inferred from the second argument. There has been no mention of domination of markets by a single source. Thus, option 1 is the answer.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 4

Directions: The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each question.

Professor Amartya Sen, the eminent economist and the Noble Laureate in Economics (1998), in his espoused theory of welfare economy, emphasized that in many underdeveloped countries like India, the state should play an important and increasingly varied role of economic development today. There are four general arguments, all of them related, for state participation in economic development. First, the entrance requirements in terms of financial capital and capital equipment are very large in certain industries, and the size of these obstacles will serve as barriers to entry on the part of private investors. One can imagine that these obstacles are imposing in industries such as steel production, automobiles, electronics, and parts of the textile industry. In addition, there are what Myint calls technical indivisibilities in social overhead capital. Public utilities, transport, communication and other infra-structural facilities must be in place before industrial development can occur, and they do not lend themselves to small-scale improvements.
A related argument centers on the demand side of economy. This economy is seen as fragmented, disconnected, and incapable of inputs from other parts of the economy. Consequently, economic activity in one part of the economy does not generate the dynamism in other sectors that is expected in more cohesive economics. Industrialization necessarily involves many different sectors; economic enterprises will thrive best in an environment in which they draw on inputs from related economic sectors and, in turn, release their own goods for industrial utilization within their own economics.
A third argument concerns the low-level equilibrium trap in which less developed countries find themselves. At subsistence levels, societies consume exactly what they produce. There is no remaining surplus for investment. As per-capita income rises, however the additional income will not be used for savings and investment. Instead, it will have the effect of increasing the population that will eat up the surplus and force the society to its former subsistence position. Fortunately, after a certain point, the rate of population growth will decrease; economic growth will intersect with and eventually outstrip population growth. The private sector, however, will not be able to provide the one-shot large dose of capital to push economic growth beyond those levels where population increases eat up the incremental advances.
The final argument concerns the relationship between delayed development and the state. Countries wishing to industrialize today have more competitors, and these competitors occupy a more differentiated industrial terrain than previously. This means that the available niches in the international system are more limited. For today's industrializers, therefore, the process of industrialization cannot be a haphazard affair, nor can the pace, content, direction be left solely to market forces. Part of the reason for a strong state presence, then, relates specifically to the competitive international environment in which modern countries and firms must operate.

Q. According to the passage, the low-level equilibrium trap in underdeveloped countries results from

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 4

Low-level equilibrium is discussed in the third argument of the passage. Option 3 can be inferred from the lines, "...after a certain point, the rate of population growth will decrease; economic growth will intersect with and eventually outstrip population growth. The private sector, however, will not be able to provide the one-shot large dose of capital to push economic growth beyond those levels where population increases eat up the incremental advances."
Option 1 is incorrect because it will be a positive fallout and is not entirely negative. Option 2 is incorrect because it is desired and not the cause of the low-level equilibrium trap in the underdeveloped countries. Option 4 is incorrect because the author does not state this to be the reason behind the low-level equilibrium trap in underdeveloped countries.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 5

Directions: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Among the cryptic stories everyone knows since childhood, the myth of Atlantis is probably one of the most thrilling and mysterious ones. The idea of a huge continent lying underwater, once inhabited by a supposedly ingenious civilisation is intriguing on its own, and the numerous hints and clues that Atlantis was a real place make archaeologists, historians, and adventurers across the globe seek for its remains with enviable enthusiasm. Still, the myth of Atlantis is controversial and debated, and there are numerous theories regarding where it was located, which people inhabited it, and why this civilisation disappeared.
Before the 19th century, Atlantis was more of a myth romantic seekers of truth tried to prove; however, in 1882, Ignatius Donnelly published a book titled ''Atlantis, the Antediluvian'' World; in this manuscript, he proved that Atlantis was not a mere legend crafted by Plato, but could be a historical reality. Donnelly believed there must have been an incredibly advanced ancient civilisation that invented metallurgy, agriculture, astronomy, and so on, and from which other, less sophisticated civilisations must have had inherited knowledge and technologies. He also believed that Atlantis was located right where Plato described: near the Pillars of Hercules by the Straits of Gibraltar; the Atlantic Ocean's ''shifting waters,'' as he called it, sank the continent on which Atlantis was located. Continental plate tectonics shows that Donnelly's theory is incorrect, but it happened to be extremely tenacious, so even nowadays many people believed Atlantis to have existed right where Plato said it did. This theory also inspired other people to start looking for Atlantis, spawning dozens of newer speculations. One of them belongs to Charles Berlitz, an author who mostly wrote about various paranormal phenomena. Berlitz claimed that Atlantis sank in the infamous Bermuda Triangle. Obviously, none of these theories stands up to criticism, but they still remain popular.
A more realistic explanation of the emergence of the image of Atlantis is offered by a professor of classics at Bard College in Annandale, James Romm. He believes that Atlantis was a metaphor introduced by Plato to illustrate his philosophical concepts. Romm says that Plato ''was dealing with a number of issues, themes that run throughout his work. The myth about Atlantis could be an illustration of Plato's ideas about a utopian state. Besides, there is more proof that Atlantis must have been a metaphor rather than a historic reality.
So far, it is still not clear whether Atlantis existed or not. Romantics believe it did, continuing to invent new theories, clinging to a few unreliable theories introduced in the past; modern science, however - oceanography, in particular - proves them wrong. The most credible explanation of Atlantis is that it must have been Plato's metaphor illustrating his philosophical concepts; advocating a utopian society. Plato described a prosperous civilisation which fell the victim of its own greediness, immorality, and corruption; in this regard, the legend of Atlantis makes perfect sense.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following did Donnelly suggest about Atlantis in his book?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 5

According to the passage, 'Ignatius Donnelly published a book titled ''Atlantis, the Antediluvian'' World; in this manuscript, he proved that Atlantis was not a mere legend crafted by Plato, but could be a historical reality. Donnelly believed there must have been an incredibly advanced ancient civilisation that invented metallurgy, agriculture, astronomy, and so on, and from which other, less sophisticated civilisations must have had inherited knowledge and technologies.' Therefore, option 1 is the right answer.
Option 2 is incorrect because it is not stated in the passage that these civilisations stole from others.
Option 3 is incorrect because the text states some other reason: "He also believed that Atlantis was located right where Plato described: near the Pillars of Hercules by the Straits of Gibraltar; the Atlantic Ocean's ''shifting waters,'' as he called it, sank the continent on which Atlantis was located."
Option 4 is incorrect because he didn't encourage people, they themselves got inspired after reading his theory.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 6

Directions: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Among the cryptic stories everyone knows since childhood, the myth of Atlantis is probably one of the most thrilling and mysterious ones. The idea of a huge continent lying underwater, once inhabited by a supposedly ingenious civilisation is intriguing on its own, and the numerous hints and clues that Atlantis was a real place make archaeologists, historians, and adventurers across the globe seek for its remains with enviable enthusiasm. Still, the myth of Atlantis is controversial and debated, and there are numerous theories regarding where it was located, which people inhabited it, and why this civilisation disappeared.
Before the 19th century, Atlantis was more of a myth romantic seekers of truth tried to prove; however, in 1882, Ignatius Donnelly published a book titled ''Atlantis, the Antediluvian'' World; in this manuscript, he proved that Atlantis was not a mere legend crafted by Plato, but could be a historical reality. Donnelly believed there must have been an incredibly advanced ancient civilisation that invented metallurgy, agriculture, astronomy, and so on, and from which other, less sophisticated civilisations must have had inherited knowledge and technologies. He also believed that Atlantis was located right where Plato described: near the Pillars of Hercules by the Straits of Gibraltar; the Atlantic Ocean's ''shifting waters,'' as he called it, sank the continent on which Atlantis was located. Continental plate tectonics shows that Donnelly's theory is incorrect, but it happened to be extremely tenacious, so even nowadays many people believed Atlantis to have existed right where Plato said it did. This theory also inspired other people to start looking for Atlantis, spawning dozens of newer speculations. One of them belongs to Charles Berlitz, an author who mostly wrote about various paranormal phenomena. Berlitz claimed that Atlantis sank in the infamous Bermuda Triangle. Obviously, none of these theories stands up to criticism, but they still remain popular.
A more realistic explanation of the emergence of the image of Atlantis is offered by a professor of classics at Bard College in Annandale, James Romm. He believes that Atlantis was a metaphor introduced by Plato to illustrate his philosophical concepts. Romm says that Plato ''was dealing with a number of issues, themes that run throughout his work. The myth about Atlantis could be an illustration of Plato's ideas about a utopian state. Besides, there is more proof that Atlantis must have been a metaphor rather than a historic reality.
So far, it is still not clear whether Atlantis existed or not. Romantics believe it did, continuing to invent new theories, clinging to a few unreliable theories introduced in the past; modern science, however - oceanography, in particular - proves them wrong. The most credible explanation of Atlantis is that it must have been Plato's metaphor illustrating his philosophical concepts; advocating a utopian society. Plato described a prosperous civilisation which fell the victim of its own greediness, immorality, and corruption; in this regard, the legend of Atlantis makes perfect sense.

Q. According to the passage, which of the following statements is closest to Berlitz's claim about Atlantis?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 6

According to the passage, 'Berlitz claimed that Atlantis sank in the infamous Bermuda Triangle.' Therefore, option 3 is the right answer. Other options are incorrect because they are far from Berlitz claims made in the passage.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 7

Directions: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Among the cryptic stories everyone knows since childhood, the myth of Atlantis is probably one of the most thrilling and mysterious ones. The idea of a huge continent lying underwater, once inhabited by a supposedly ingenious civilisation is intriguing on its own, and the numerous hints and clues that Atlantis was a real place make archaeologists, historians, and adventurers across the globe seek for its remains with enviable enthusiasm. Still, the myth of Atlantis is controversial and debated, and there are numerous theories regarding where it was located, which people inhabited it, and why this civilisation disappeared.
Before the 19th century, Atlantis was more of a myth romantic seekers of truth tried to prove; however, in 1882, Ignatius Donnelly published a book titled ''Atlantis, the Antediluvian'' World; in this manuscript, he proved that Atlantis was not a mere legend crafted by Plato, but could be a historical reality. Donnelly believed there must have been an incredibly advanced ancient civilisation that invented metallurgy, agriculture, astronomy, and so on, and from which other, less sophisticated civilisations must have had inherited knowledge and technologies. He also believed that Atlantis was located right where Plato described: near the Pillars of Hercules by the Straits of Gibraltar; the Atlantic Ocean's ''shifting waters,'' as he called it, sank the continent on which Atlantis was located. Continental plate tectonics shows that Donnelly's theory is incorrect, but it happened to be extremely tenacious, so even nowadays many people believed Atlantis to have existed right where Plato said it did. This theory also inspired other people to start looking for Atlantis, spawning dozens of newer speculations. One of them belongs to Charles Berlitz, an author who mostly wrote about various paranormal phenomena. Berlitz claimed that Atlantis sank in the infamous Bermuda Triangle. Obviously, none of these theories stands up to criticism, but they still remain popular.
A more realistic explanation of the emergence of the image of Atlantis is offered by a professor of classics at Bard College in Annandale, James Romm. He believes that Atlantis was a metaphor introduced by Plato to illustrate his philosophical concepts. Romm says that Plato ''was dealing with a number of issues, themes that run throughout his work. The myth about Atlantis could be an illustration of Plato's ideas about a utopian state. Besides, there is more proof that Atlantis must have been a metaphor rather than a historic reality.
So far, it is still not clear whether Atlantis existed or not. Romantics believe it did, continuing to invent new theories, clinging to a few unreliable theories introduced in the past; modern science, however - oceanography, in particular - proves them wrong. The most credible explanation of Atlantis is that it must have been Plato's metaphor illustrating his philosophical concepts; advocating a utopian society. Plato described a prosperous civilisation which fell the victim of its own greediness, immorality, and corruption; in this regard, the legend of Atlantis makes perfect sense.

Q. On the basis of the information provided in the passage, in which of the following ways was James Romm's theory different from that of Ignatius Donnelly?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 7

According to the passage, 'He believes that Atlantis was a metaphor introduced by Plato to illustrate his philosophical concepts.' Therefore, option 1 is the right answer. Although all the others are also stated by James Romm but the other statements are not the point of distinction from the theory of Ignatius Donnelly - 'he proved that Atlantis was not a mere legend crafted by Plato, but could be a historical reality.'

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 8

Directions: Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Among the cryptic stories everyone knows since childhood, the myth of Atlantis is probably one of the most thrilling and mysterious ones. The idea of a huge continent lying underwater, once inhabited by a supposedly ingenious civilisation is intriguing on its own, and the numerous hints and clues that Atlantis was a real place make archaeologists, historians, and adventurers across the globe seek for its remains with enviable enthusiasm. Still, the myth of Atlantis is controversial and debated, and there are numerous theories regarding where it was located, which people inhabited it, and why this civilisation disappeared.
Before the 19th century, Atlantis was more of a myth romantic seekers of truth tried to prove; however, in 1882, Ignatius Donnelly published a book titled ''Atlantis, the Antediluvian'' World; in this manuscript, he proved that Atlantis was not a mere legend crafted by Plato, but could be a historical reality. Donnelly believed there must have been an incredibly advanced ancient civilisation that invented metallurgy, agriculture, astronomy, and so on, and from which other, less sophisticated civilisations must have had inherited knowledge and technologies. He also believed that Atlantis was located right where Plato described: near the Pillars of Hercules by the Straits of Gibraltar; the Atlantic Ocean's ''shifting waters,'' as he called it, sank the continent on which Atlantis was located. Continental plate tectonics shows that Donnelly's theory is incorrect, but it happened to be extremely tenacious, so even nowadays many people believed Atlantis to have existed right where Plato said it did. This theory also inspired other people to start looking for Atlantis, spawning dozens of newer speculations. One of them belongs to Charles Berlitz, an author who mostly wrote about various paranormal phenomena. Berlitz claimed that Atlantis sank in the infamous Bermuda Triangle. Obviously, none of these theories stands up to criticism, but they still remain popular.
A more realistic explanation of the emergence of the image of Atlantis is offered by a professor of classics at Bard College in Annandale, James Romm. He believes that Atlantis was a metaphor introduced by Plato to illustrate his philosophical concepts. Romm says that Plato ''was dealing with a number of issues, themes that run throughout his work. The myth about Atlantis could be an illustration of Plato's ideas about a utopian state. Besides, there is more proof that Atlantis must have been a metaphor rather than a historic reality.
So far, it is still not clear whether Atlantis existed or not. Romantics believe it did, continuing to invent new theories, clinging to a few unreliable theories introduced in the past; modern science, however - oceanography, in particular - proves them wrong. The most credible explanation of Atlantis is that it must have been Plato's metaphor illustrating his philosophical concepts; advocating a utopian society. Plato described a prosperous civilisation which fell the victim of its own greediness, immorality, and corruption; in this regard, the legend of Atlantis makes perfect sense.

Q. Which of the following options best summarises the main idea of the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 8

According to the passage, 'So far, it is still not clear whether Atlantis existed or not. Romantics believe it did, continuing to invent new theories, clinging to a few unreliable theories introduced in the past; modern science, however - oceanography, in particular - proves them wrong. The most credible explanation of Atlantis is that it must have been Plato's metaphor illustrating his philosophical concepts; advocating a utopian society. Plato described a prosperous civilisation which fell the victim of its own greediness, immorality, and corruption; in this regard, the legend of Atlantis makes perfect sense.'
Therefore, option 4 captures the essence of the passage aptly.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 9

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.

Great emotional and intellectual resources are demanded in quarrels; stamina helps, as does a capacity for obsession. But no one is born a good quarreler; the craft must be learned. There are two generally recognized apprenticeships. First, and universally preferred, is a long childhood spent in the company of fractious siblings. After several years of rainy afternoons, brothers and sisters develop a sure feel for the tactics of attrition and the niceties of strategy so necessary in first-rate quarrelling.
The only child, or the child of peaceful or repressed households, is likely to grow up failing to understand that quarrels, unlike arguments, are not about anything, least of all the pursuit of truth. The apparent subject of a quarrel is a mere pretext, the real business is the quarrel itself.
Essentially, adversaries in a quarrel are out to establish or rescue their dignity. Hence the elementary principle: anything may be said. The unschooled, probably no less quarrelsome by inclination than anyone else, may spend an hour with knocking heart, sifting the consequences of calling this old acquaintance a lying fraud, 'Too late?' with a cheerful wave the old acquaintance has left the room.
Those who miss their first apprenticeship may care to enrol in the second, the bad marriage. This can be perilous for the neophyte; the mutual intimacy of spouses makes them at once more vulnerable and more dangerous in attack. Once sex is involved, the stakes are higher all round. And there is an unspoken rule that those who love, or have loved, one another are granted a license for unlimited beastliness such as is denied to mere sworn enemies. For all that, some of our most tenacious black belt quarrellers have come to it late in life and mastered every throw, from the Crushing Silence to the Gloating Apology, in less than ten years of marriage.
A quarrel may last years. Among brooding types with time on their hands like writers, half a lifetime is not uncommon. In its most refined form, a quarrel may consist of the participants not talking to each other. They will need to scheme laboriously to appear in public together to register their silence. Brief, violent quarrels are also known as rows. In all cases the essential ingredient remains the same; the original cause must be forgotten as soon as possible. From here on, dignity, pride, self-esteem, honour are the crucial issues, which is why quarrelling, like jealousy, is an all-consuming business, virtually a profession. For the quarreller's very self-hood is on the line. To lose an argument is a brief disappointment, much like losing a game of tennis; but to be crushed in a quarrel…rather bite off your tongue and spread it at your opponent's feet.

Q. According to the author, unschooled quarrelers are said to be at a disadvantage because

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 9

The answer to this question can be inferred from, "The unschooled, probably no less quarrelsome by inclination than anyone else, may spend an hour with knocking heart, sifting the consequences of calling this old acquaintance a lying fraud". From this line it can be successfully inferred that the unschooled end up having remorse or feeling sorry for what they said. Hence, option 3 is correct. Other options are not mentioned in the text and therefore are incorrect.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 10

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.

Great emotional and intellectual resources are demanded in quarrels; stamina helps, as does a capacity for obsession. But no one is born a good quarreler; the craft must be learned. There are two generally recognized apprenticeships. First, and universally preferred, is a long childhood spent in the company of fractious siblings. After several years of rainy afternoons, brothers and sisters develop a sure feel for the tactics of attrition and the niceties of strategy so necessary in first-rate quarrelling.
The only child, or the child of peaceful or repressed households, is likely to grow up failing to understand that quarrels, unlike arguments, are not about anything, least of all the pursuit of truth. The apparent subject of a quarrel is a mere pretext, the real business is the quarrel itself.
Essentially, adversaries in a quarrel are out to establish or rescue their dignity. Hence the elementary principle: anything may be said. The unschooled, probably no less quarrelsome by inclination than anyone else, may spend an hour with knocking heart, sifting the consequences of calling this old acquaintance a lying fraud, 'Too late?' with a cheerful wave the old acquaintance has left the room.
Those who miss their first apprenticeship may care to enrol in the second, the bad marriage. This can be perilous for the neophyte; the mutual intimacy of spouses makes them at once more vulnerable and more dangerous in attack. Once sex is involved, the stakes are higher all round. And there is an unspoken rule that those who love, or have loved, one another are granted a license for unlimited beastliness such as is denied to mere sworn enemies. For all that, some of our most tenacious black belt quarrellers have come to it late in life and mastered every throw, from the Crushing Silence to the Gloating Apology, in less than ten years of marriage.
A quarrel may last years. Among brooding types with time on their hands like writers, half a lifetime is not uncommon. In its most refined form, a quarrel may consist of the participants not talking to each other. They will need to scheme laboriously to appear in public together to register their silence. Brief, violent quarrels are also known as rows. In all cases the essential ingredient remains the same; the original cause must be forgotten as soon as possible. From here on, dignity, pride, self-esteem, honour are the crucial issues, which is why quarrelling, like jealousy, is an all-consuming business, virtually a profession. For the quarreller's very self-hood is on the line. To lose an argument is a brief disappointment, much like losing a game of tennis; but to be crushed in a quarrel…rather bite off your tongue and spread it at your opponent's feet.

Q. According to the writer, quarrels between married couples may be

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 10

Option 2 can be inferred from the lines, " the bad marriage ... those who love, or have loved, one another are granted a license for unlimited beastliness such as is denied to mere sworn enemies." So it can be inferred that quarrels of married couples may turn out to be extremely bitter. Option 1 is incorrect because it takes the literal sense of 'beastliness' but the author is only talking about quarreling between couples. Option 3 and 4 are incorrect because they are not suggested by the author in the passage.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 11

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.

Great emotional and intellectual resources are demanded in quarrels; stamina helps, as does a capacity for obsession. But no one is born a good quarreler; the craft must be learned. There are two generally recognized apprenticeships. First, and universally preferred, is a long childhood spent in the company of fractious siblings. After several years of rainy afternoons, brothers and sisters develop a sure feel for the tactics of attrition and the niceties of strategy so necessary in first-rate quarrelling.
The only child, or the child of peaceful or repressed households, is likely to grow up failing to understand that quarrels, unlike arguments, are not about anything, least of all the pursuit of truth. The apparent subject of a quarrel is a mere pretext, the real business is the quarrel itself.
Essentially, adversaries in a quarrel are out to establish or rescue their dignity. Hence the elementary principle: anything may be said. The unschooled, probably no less quarrelsome by inclination than anyone else, may spend an hour with knocking heart, sifting the consequences of calling this old acquaintance a lying fraud, 'Too late?' with a cheerful wave the old acquaintance has left the room.
Those who miss their first apprenticeship may care to enrol in the second, the bad marriage. This can be perilous for the neophyte; the mutual intimacy of spouses makes them at once more vulnerable and more dangerous in attack. Once sex is involved, the stakes are higher all round. And there is an unspoken rule that those who love, or have loved, one another are granted a license for unlimited beastliness such as is denied to mere sworn enemies. For all that, some of our most tenacious black belt quarrellers have come to it late in life and mastered every throw, from the Crushing Silence to the Gloating Apology, in less than ten years of marriage.
A quarrel may last years. Among brooding types with time on their hands like writers, half a lifetime is not uncommon. In its most refined form, a quarrel may consist of the participants not talking to each other. They will need to scheme laboriously to appear in public together to register their silence. Brief, violent quarrels are also known as rows. In all cases the essential ingredient remains the same; the original cause must be forgotten as soon as possible. From here on, dignity, pride, self-esteem, honour are the crucial issues, which is why quarrelling, like jealousy, is an all-consuming business, virtually a profession. For the quarreller's very self-hood is on the line. To lose an argument is a brief disappointment, much like losing a game of tennis; but to be crushed in a quarrel…rather bite off your tongue and spread it at your opponent's feet.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 11

It can be inferred from the passage that the author suggests that children and married couples turn out to be pretty brutal when quarreling. The same can also be inferred from the lines, "brothers and sisters develop a sure feel for the tactics of attrition" and "those who love, or have loved, one another are granted a license for unlimited beastliness such as is denied to mere sworn enemies". Hence, option 1 is correct. Other options are not mentioned in the text and are therefore incorrect.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 12

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.

Great emotional and intellectual resources are demanded in quarrels; stamina helps, as does a capacity for obsession. But no one is born a good quarreler; the craft must be learned. There are two generally recognized apprenticeships. First, and universally preferred, is a long childhood spent in the company of fractious siblings. After several years of rainy afternoons, brothers and sisters develop a sure feel for the tactics of attrition and the niceties of strategy so necessary in first-rate quarrelling.
The only child, or the child of peaceful or repressed households, is likely to grow up failing to understand that quarrels, unlike arguments, are not about anything, least of all the pursuit of truth. The apparent subject of a quarrel is a mere pretext, the real business is the quarrel itself.
Essentially, adversaries in a quarrel are out to establish or rescue their dignity. Hence the elementary principle: anything may be said. The unschooled, probably no less quarrelsome by inclination than anyone else, may spend an hour with knocking heart, sifting the consequences of calling this old acquaintance a lying fraud, 'Too late?' with a cheerful wave the old acquaintance has left the room.
Those who miss their first apprenticeship may care to enrol in the second, the bad marriage. This can be perilous for the neophyte; the mutual intimacy of spouses makes them at once more vulnerable and more dangerous in attack. Once sex is involved, the stakes are higher all round. And there is an unspoken rule that those who love, or have loved, one another are granted a license for unlimited beastliness such as is denied to mere sworn enemies. For all that, some of our most tenacious black belt quarrellers have come to it late in life and mastered every throw, from the Crushing Silence to the Gloating Apology, in less than ten years of marriage.
A quarrel may last years. Among brooding types with time on their hands like writers, half a lifetime is not uncommon. In its most refined form, a quarrel may consist of the participants not talking to each other. They will need to scheme laboriously to appear in public together to register their silence. Brief, violent quarrels are also known as rows. In all cases the essential ingredient remains the same; the original cause must be forgotten as soon as possible. From here on, dignity, pride, self-esteem, honour are the crucial issues, which is why quarrelling, like jealousy, is an all-consuming business, virtually a profession. For the quarreller's very self-hood is on the line. To lose an argument is a brief disappointment, much like losing a game of tennis; but to be crushed in a quarrel…rather bite off your tongue and spread it at your opponent's feet.

Q. Which of the following best states the difference between a quarrel and an argument as described by the author in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 12

From the lines, "From here on, dignity, pride, self-esteem, honour are the crucial issues, which is why quarrelling, like jealousy, is an all-consuming business, virtually a profession. For the quarreller's very self-hood is on the line" it can be inferred that quarrels involve individual egos. Hence, option 1 is correct. Other options are not given in the passage and are therefore incorrect.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 13

Directions: Answer the question based on the following passage.

Emile Durkheim, the first person to be formally recognised as a sociologist and the most scientific of the pioneers, conducted a study that stands as a research model for sociologists today. His investigation of suicide was, in fact, the first sociological study to use statistics. In Suicide (1964, originally published in 1897) Durkheim documented his contention that some aspects of human behaviour - even something as allegedly individualistic as suicide - can be explained without reference to individuals.
Like all of Durkheim's work, suicide must be viewed within the context of his concern for social integration. Durkheim wanted to see if suicide rates within a social entity (for example, a group, organisation, or society) are related to the degree to which individuals are socially involved (integrated and regulated). Durkheim described three types of suicide: egoistic, anomic and altruistic. Egoistic suicide is promoted when individuals do not have sufficient social ties. Since single (never married) adults, for example, are not heavily involved with family life, they are more likely to commit suicide. On the other hand, altruistic suicide is more likely to occur when social integration is too strong. The ritual suicide of Hindu widows on their husbands' funeral pyres is one example. Military personnel, trained to lay down their lives for their country, provide another illustration.
Durkheim's third type of suicide - anomic suicide increases when the social regulation of individuals is disrupted. For example, suicide rates increase during economic depression. People who suddenly find themselves without a job or without hope of finding one are more prone to kill themselves. Suicide may also increase during periods of prosperity. People may loosen their social ties by taking new jobs, moving to new communities, or finding new mates. Using data from the government population reports of several countries (much of it from the French Government Statistical Officer), Durkheim found strong support for his line of reasoning. Suicide rates were higher among single than married people, among military personnel than civilians, among divorced than married people, and among people involved in nation-wide economic crises.
It is important to realise that Durkheim's primary interest was not in the empirical (observable) indicators he used such as suicide rates among military personnel, married people, and so forth. Rather, Durkheim used the following indicators to support several of his contentions: (1) Social behaviour can be explained by social rather than psychological factors; (2) Suicide is affected by the degree of integration and regulation within social entities; and (3) Since society can be studied scientifically, sociology is worthy of recognition in the academic world. Durkheim was successful on all three counts.

Q. In his study of suicide, Durkheim's main purpose was

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 13

First paragraph clearly states that Durkheim's main purpose was to document that some aspects of human behaviour can be explained without reference to the individual - ''Durkheim documented ... without reference to individuals.''

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 14

Directions: Answer the question based on the following passage.

Emile Durkheim, the first person to be formally recognised as a sociologist and the most scientific of the pioneers, conducted a study that stands as a research model for sociologists today. His investigation of suicide was, in fact, the first sociological study to use statistics. In Suicide (1964, originally published in 1897) Durkheim documented his contention that some aspects of human behaviour - even something as allegedly individualistic as suicide - can be explained without reference to individuals.
Like all of Durkheim's work, suicide must be viewed within the context of his concern for social integration. Durkheim wanted to see if suicide rates within a social entity (for example, a group, organisation, or society) are related to the degree to which individuals are socially involved (integrated and regulated). Durkheim described three types of suicide: egoistic, anomic and altruistic. Egoistic suicide is promoted when individuals do not have sufficient social ties. Since single (never married) adults, for example, are not heavily involved with family life, they are more likely to commit suicide. On the other hand, altruistic suicide is more likely to occur when social integration is too strong. The ritual suicide of Hindu widows on their husbands' funeral pyres is one example. Military personnel, trained to lay down their lives for their country, provide another illustration.
Durkheim's third type of suicide - anomic suicide increases when the social regulation of individuals is disrupted. For example, suicide rates increase during economic depression. People who suddenly find themselves without a job or without hope of finding one are more prone to kill themselves. Suicide may also increase during periods of prosperity. People may loosen their social ties by taking new jobs, moving to new communities, or finding new mates. Using data from the government population reports of several countries (much of it from the French Government Statistical Officer), Durkheim found strong support for his line of reasoning. Suicide rates were higher among single than married people, among military personnel than civilians, among divorced than married people, and among people involved in nation-wide economic crises.
It is important to realise that Durkheim's primary interest was not in the empirical (observable) indicators he used such as suicide rates among military personnel, married people, and so forth. Rather, Durkheim used the following indicators to support several of his contentions: (1) Social behaviour can be explained by social rather than psychological factors; (2) Suicide is affected by the degree of integration and regulation within social entities; and (3) Since society can be studied scientifically, sociology is worthy of recognition in the academic world. Durkheim was successful on all three counts.

Q. Since single adults are not heavily involved with family life, they are more likely to commit suicide, which Durkheim categorised as

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 14

It is mentioned in lines, ''Egoistic suicide is promoted when individuals do not have sufficient social ties. Since single (never married) adults, for example, are not heavily involved with family life, they are more likely to commit suicide.''

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 15

Directions: Answer the question based on the following passage.

Emile Durkheim, the first person to be formally recognised as a sociologist and the most scientific of the pioneers, conducted a study that stands as a research model for sociologists today. His investigation of suicide was, in fact, the first sociological study to use statistics. In Suicide (1964, originally published in 1897) Durkheim documented his contention that some aspects of human behaviour - even something as allegedly individualistic as suicide - can be explained without reference to individuals.
Like all of Durkheim's work, suicide must be viewed within the context of his concern for social integration. Durkheim wanted to see if suicide rates within a social entity (for example, a group, organisation, or society) are related to the degree to which individuals are socially involved (integrated and regulated). Durkheim described three types of suicide: egoistic, anomic and altruistic. Egoistic suicide is promoted when individuals do not have sufficient social ties. Since single (never married) adults, for example, are not heavily involved with family life, they are more likely to commit suicide. On the other hand, altruistic suicide is more likely to occur when social integration is too strong. The ritual suicide of Hindu widows on their husbands' funeral pyres is one example. Military personnel, trained to lay down their lives for their country, provide another illustration.
Durkheim's third type of suicide - anomic suicide increases when the social regulation of individuals is disrupted. For example, suicide rates increase during economic depression. People who suddenly find themselves without a job or without hope of finding one are more prone to kill themselves. Suicide may also increase during periods of prosperity. People may loosen their social ties by taking new jobs, moving to new communities, or finding new mates. Using data from the government population reports of several countries (much of it from the French Government Statistical Officer), Durkheim found strong support for his line of reasoning. Suicide rates were higher among single than married people, among military personnel than civilians, among divorced than married people, and among people involved in nation-wide economic crises.
It is important to realise that Durkheim's primary interest was not in the empirical (observable) indicators he used such as suicide rates among military personnel, married people, and so forth. Rather, Durkheim used the following indicators to support several of his contentions: (1) Social behaviour can be explained by social rather than psychological factors; (2) Suicide is affected by the degree of integration and regulation within social entities; and (3) Since society can be studied scientifically, sociology is worthy of recognition in the academic world. Durkheim was successful on all three counts.

Q. Ritual suicide of Hindu widows on their husbands' funeral pyres was

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 15

''Altruistic suicide is more likely to occur when social integration is too strong. The ritual suicide of Hindu widows on their husbands' funeral pyres is one example.'' Option 1 is correct.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 16

Directions: Answer the question based on the following passage.

Emile Durkheim, the first person to be formally recognised as a sociologist and the most scientific of the pioneers, conducted a study that stands as a research model for sociologists today. His investigation of suicide was, in fact, the first sociological study to use statistics. In Suicide (1964, originally published in 1897) Durkheim documented his contention that some aspects of human behaviour - even something as allegedly individualistic as suicide - can be explained without reference to individuals.
Like all of Durkheim's work, suicide must be viewed within the context of his concern for social integration. Durkheim wanted to see if suicide rates within a social entity (for example, a group, organisation, or society) are related to the degree to which individuals are socially involved (integrated and regulated). Durkheim described three types of suicide: egoistic, anomic and altruistic. Egoistic suicide is promoted when individuals do not have sufficient social ties. Since single (never married) adults, for example, are not heavily involved with family life, they are more likely to commit suicide. On the other hand, altruistic suicide is more likely to occur when social integration is too strong. The ritual suicide of Hindu widows on their husbands' funeral pyres is one example. Military personnel, trained to lay down their lives for their country, provide another illustration.
Durkheim's third type of suicide - anomic suicide increases when the social regulation of individuals is disrupted. For example, suicide rates increase during economic depression. People who suddenly find themselves without a job or without hope of finding one are more prone to kill themselves. Suicide may also increase during periods of prosperity. People may loosen their social ties by taking new jobs, moving to new communities, or finding new mates. Using data from the government population reports of several countries (much of it from the French Government Statistical Officer), Durkheim found strong support for his line of reasoning. Suicide rates were higher among single than married people, among military personnel than civilians, among divorced than married people, and among people involved in nation-wide economic crises.
It is important to realise that Durkheim's primary interest was not in the empirical (observable) indicators he used such as suicide rates among military personnel, married people, and so forth. Rather, Durkheim used the following indicators to support several of his contentions: (1) Social behaviour can be explained by social rather than psychological factors; (2) Suicide is affected by the degree of integration and regulation within social entities; and (3) Since society can be studied scientifically, sociology is worthy of recognition in the academic world. Durkheim was successful on all three counts.

Q. The approach of Emile Durkheim can be termed scientific on all of the following counts, except

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 16

Option 1 makes Durkheim's approach scientific since it was first attempt to use statistics (His investigation ... statistics).
Option 2 is the answer, since this had nothing to do with Durkheim's approach. Durkheim made use of data and not specific instances. The first sentence of the last paragraph makes this clear.
Option 3 means that his conclusions or investigations could be verified and thus supported; hence, the approach can be called scientific (Durkheim wanted to see if suicide rates ... to lay down their lives for their country, provide another illustration).
Option 4 is the essence of Durkheim's approach, which was the primary reason for it being labelled scientific (Social behaviour ... than psychological factors).

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 17

Directions: Four alternative summaries are given below the text. Choose the option that best captures the essence of the text.

Although almost all climate scientists agree that the Earth is gradually warming, they have long been of two minds about the process of rapid climate shifts within larger periods of change. Some have speculated that the process works like a giant oven or freezer, warming or cooling the whole planet at the same time. Others think that shifts occur on opposing schedule in the northern and southern hemispheres, like exaggerated season. Recent research in Germany examining climate patterns in the southern hemisphere at the end of the last Ice Age strengthens the idea that warming and cooling occurs at alternate times in the two hemispheres. A more definitive answer to this debate will allow scientists to better predict when how quickly the next climate shift will happen.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 17

''They have long been of two minds about the process of rapid climate shifts'' and ''A more definitive answer to this debate will allow scientists to better predict...'' are the points here. Thus, option 2 is the correct answer.
''Research in Germany'' is not a point of focus here. So, options 3 and 4 are ruled out.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 18

Directions: The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, and 4) below, when properly sequenced, would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequencing of the order of the sentences and key in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer.

1. The process of regulating calcium is accomplished by calcium pumps, channels, and binding proteins, allowing the background concentration of calcium within the cell to remain low.

2. The primary consideration behind these mechanisms is the tight regulation of the calcium concentration gradient and calcium's role as a cofactor for many enzymes.

3. By maintaining a low nano-molar concentration, even minor increases in calcium levels can result in a relatively large change in the calcium concentration gradient, resulting in a variety of cell activities.

4. As a player in cellular signaling, calcium presents a role in regulating intracellular processes such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse signaling, cell fluid balance, and more.


Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 18

4 - This introduces the context of the passage. It points out that 'calcium' has a role in regulating certain processes which in turn play a role in cellular signaling.

2 - Here, 'these mechanisms' refer to different intracellular processes defined in the previous sentence. It specifies that the main consideration is 'tight regulation' of calcium concentration.

1 - The 'regulation' aspect is further elaborated upon in this sentence. It specifies that the regulation is accomplished because of certain accompanying devices and factors, which help to keep the concentration of calcium in a cell low.

3 - At last, the 'low' concentration discussed in previous statement is being further elaborated upon. It concludes by saying that even minor changes (regulation) can result in larger changes.

Thus, the correct sequence will be 4213.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 19

Directions: Four alternative summaries are given below the text. Choose the option that best captures the essence of the text.

Modern bourgeois society, said Nietzsche, was decadent and enfeebled - a victim of the excessive development of the rational faculties at the expense of will and instinct. Against the liberal-rationalist stress on the intellect, Nietzsche urged recognition of the dark mysterious world of instinctual desires - the true forces of life. Smother the will with excessive intellectualising and you destroy the spontaneity that sparks cultural creativity and ignites a zest for living. The critical and theoretical outlook destroyed the creative instincts. For man's manifold potential to be realised, he must forego relying on the intellect and nurture again the instinctual roots of human existence.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 19

The central idea of the paragraph is that Nietzsche blames excessive intellectualisation to be responsible for the decline of modern society and suggests nurturing creative instincts instead. ''Smother the will with excessive intellectualising and you destroy the spontaneity that sparks cultural creativity ... forego relying on the intellect and nurture again the instinctual roots of human existence.'' Option 4 captures this correctly.

CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 20

Directions: There is a sentence that is missing in the paragraph below. Look at the paragraph and decide in which blank (option 1, 2, 3, or 4) the following sentence would best fit.

Sentence: This could widen the energy access gap between wealthy and developing economies.

Paragraph: But as with all major scientific advancements, it is important to temper excitement with realism. __(1)__. In theory, the abundance of hydrogen in the atmosphere means nuclear fusion can produce as much clean energy as the world needs. But throughout history, such breakthroughs have far too often served to deepen - rather than reduce - disparities. __(2)__. Not many nations will have the resources to scale up the success of what has been attempted in the US. There is no reason to believe that nations that succeed will share their technological knowhow with countries that are poorer or have less sophisticated scientific establishments. ___(3)___. If countries use fusion to develop a new generation of devastating weapons, it could spark a dangerous new arms race. __(4)__. Like the sun itself, the power of fusion must be a source of life, available to rich and poor alike.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 20

The given sentence best fits blank 3. The sentence preceding blank 3 states that countries may be unable to share their technological knowledge with poorer countries. 'This . . .' refers to this inability to share. It would result in the widening of 'energy access gap between wealthy and developing countries'. While the idea of 'disparities' is hinted even just before blank 2, nothing has been stated about countries' economic level and the resulting comparison between different countries. 'This . .' does not refer to 'realism' as stated in statement 1. Thus, the statement would not fit blank 1 too.

*Answer can only contain numeric values
CAT Mock Test - 14 - Question 21