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CAT Mock Test - 17 - CAT MCQ


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66 Questions MCQ Test CAT Mock Test Series 2024 - CAT Mock Test - 17

CAT Mock Test - 17 for CAT 2024 is part of CAT Mock Test Series 2024 preparation. The CAT Mock Test - 17 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The CAT Mock Test - 17 MCQs are made for CAT 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for CAT Mock Test - 17 below.
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CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 1

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following examples best represent an outlier, as described in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 1
An outlier, as described in the passage is one 'whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.' This would mean someone with extraordinary talent, one who excels in a position, where others might fail. The character in option A does show talent and skill, but is not that extraordinary, as it shows the normal good outcome of hard work. Moreover, once the boy cracked the examination, everything else was bound to follow. B is incorrect as this is not very extraordinary or surprising, as we are given factors that led to his poor performance; this implies that the student himself was not lacking in hard work or intellect. C is incorrect as it presents a surprising situation, but is not extraordinary enough on the part of the student, with respect to his talent or skill. D presents the outlier as we can infer that most college dropouts do not go on to have rich or successful careers.
CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 2

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following questions cannot be answered on the basis of the information given in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 2
B is incorrect as this question is answered throughout the passage: 'Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success.'

C is incorrect as this question is answered in the last few lines: 'The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.'

D is incorrect as this question is answered in the first few paragraphs: ', Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.'

A is the right answer, as the passage only tells us what outliers are, not the conditions that must be fulfilled in order to be characterised as one.

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CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 3

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. It can be understood that the main purpose of the author in the third paragraph is to:

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 3
A is incorrect as the author does not directly say or imply that attention and respect should not be given to winners. Rather he focuses more on the suggestion that one must not fall into the trap of imitating them and expecting similar returns. C is incorrect as the passage talks of all winners, not only Gates, although it does talk of him as an example. D is incorrect as this is his primary purpose in later paragraphs, not the third one. B is the right answer, as the author seeks to clear the misconception that success cannot be achieved simply by imitating life's winners, as they did not succeed through performance alone.
CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 4

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Bill Gates is a lot luckier than you might realise. He may be a very talented man who worked his way up from geek to the top spot on the list of the world's richest people. But his extreme success perhaps tells us more about the importance of circumstances beyond his control than it does about how skill and perseverance are rewarded.

We often fall for the idea that the exceptional performers are the most skilled or talented. But this is flawed. Exceptional performances tend to occur in exceptional circumstances. Top performers are often the luckiest people, who have benefited from being at the right place and right time. They are what we call outliers, whose performances may be examples set apart from the system that everyone else works within.

Many treat Gates, and other highly successful people like him, as deserving of huge attention and reward, as people from whom we could learn a lot about how to succeed. But assuming life's "winners" got there from performance alone is likely to lead to disappointment. Even if you could imitate everything Gates did, you would not be able to replicate his initial good fortune.

For example, Gates's upper-class background and private education enabled him to gain extra programming experience when less than 0.01% of his generation then had access to computers. His mother's social connection with IBM's chairman enabled him to gain a contract from the then-leading PC company that was crucial for establishing his software empire.

This is important because most customers who used IBM computers were forced to learn how to use Microsoft's software that came along with it. This created an inertia in Microsoft's favour. The next software these customers chose was more likely to be Microsoft's, not because their software was necessarily the best, but because most people were too busy to learn how to use anything else.

Microsoft's success and market share may differ from the rest by several orders of magnitude, but the difference was really enabled by Gate's early fortune, reinforced by a strong success-breeds-success dynamic. Of course, Gates's talent and effort played important roles in the extreme success of Microsoft. But that's not enough for creating such an outlier. Talent and effort are likely to be less important than circumstances in the sense that he could not have been so successful without the latter.

One might argue that many exceptional performers still gained their exceptional skill through hard work, exceptional motivation or "grit", so they do not deserve to receive lower reward and praise. Some have even suggested that there is a magic number for greatness, a ten-year or 10,000-hour rule. Many professionals and experts did acquire their exceptional skill through persistent, deliberate practices. In fact, Gates' 10,000 hours learning computer programming as a teenager has been highlighted as one of the reasons for his success.

But detailed analyses of the case studies of experts often suggest that certain situational factors beyond the control of these exceptional performers also play an important role. For example, three national champions in table tennis came from the same street in a small suburb of one town in England.

This wasn't a coincidence or because there was nothing else to do but practise ping pong. It turns out that a famous table tennis coach, Peter Charters, happened to retire in this particular suburb. Many kids who lived on the same street as the retired coach were attracted to this sport because of him and three of them, after following the "10,000-hour rule", performed exceptionally well, including winning the national championship.

Their talent and efforts were, of course, essential for realising their exceptional performances. But without their early luck (having a reliable, high-quality coach and supportive families), simply practicing 10,000 hours without adequate feedback wouldn't likely lead a randomly picked child to become a national champion.

We could also imagine a child with superior talent in table tennis suffering from early bad luck, such as not having a capable coach or being in a country where being an athlete was not considered to be a promising career. Then they might never have a chance to realise their potential. The implication is that the more exceptional a performance is, the fewer meaningful, applicable lessons we can actually learn from the "winner".

When it comes to moderate performance, it seems much more likely that our intuition about success is correct. Conventional wisdom, such as "the harder I work the luckier I get" or "chance favours the prepared mind", makes perfect sense when talking about someone moving from poor to good performance. Going from good to great, however, is a different story.

Being in the right place (succeeding in a context where early outcome has an enduring impact) at the right time (having early luck) can be so important that it overwhelms merits. With this in mind there's a good case that we shouldn't just reward or imitate life's winners and expect to have similar success. But there is a case that the winners should consider imitating the likes of Gates (who became a philanthropist) or Warren Buffett (who argues that richer Americans should pay higher taxes) who have chosen to use their wealth and success to do good things. The winners who appreciate their luck and do not take it all deserve more of our respect.

Q. Which of the following statements best sum up the author's view of Bill Gates and his success?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 4
A is incorrect as the passage makes no mention of the fact the young people are misguided, he simply seeks to clear a misconception. B is incorrect as the author does acknowledge Gates' talent, and does not call him an opportunist. D is incorrect as it attributes all of his success to luck, and makes no mention of his own qualities. C is the right answer, as it best sums up the view the author has of Gates.
CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 5

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following statement(s) is/ are confirmed from the facts provided in the passage?

I. The lack of a strong and unifying political leader in Thailand has made the country stagger further when it comes to dealing with the recent acts of terrorism that have struck the country.

II. The recent terrorist attacks in Thailand are an example of how religion can play a major role in bringing people of a common culture together in difficult times.

III. Efforts to make Buddhism as the official religion of Thailand have so far not panned out, as the government does not let religion interfere with state matters.

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 5
I is confirmed from the information given in the fifth paragraph, which tells us that the acts of terrorism have left the Thai people unsure and scared, especially since there is no unifying leader. III is confirmed from the information provided in the third paragraph which tells us that there have been movements to make Buddhism the official religion; however, the state has remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion, from which we infer that this is the reason why those movements have not been successful. II cannot be confirmed from the passage; on the contrary, it is contradicted by the information given in the fourth paragraph which tells us that the recent terrorism acts show how religion can play a divisive role. D is the right answer, as only I and III are correct.
CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 6

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

After many years of practising Buddhism in Thailand, my experience expands beyond the immediate community in Sri Racha. In recent years as I have visited the White Dragon Temple, the social unrest in Thailand has crept into the religious aspect of my trips.

Religion exists as an innate piece of the landscape that etches itself into the small details of Thailand. It occupies both a very physical presence within the community and also a mental one. According to the Office of National Buddhism, 40,717 Buddhist temples exist in Thailand. Of these temples, a large portion resides in Bangkok, Thailand's capital.

Aside from being an important tourist element, Buddhism plays an important part in the lives of Thai people - an estimated 94% of all Thai people practice Buddhism in the country according to a Central Intelligence Agency report. Time and time again, there have been movements - in 1997, 2007, and 2014 - to concretize Buddhism as the nation's official religion. The Thai Constitutional Drafting Committee (CDC) has, however, remained neutral in the relationship between the state and religion.

Though the government's ideological stance on religion is decidedly impartial, significant ripples exist in this seemingly placid surface, and religion morphs into a central focal point in many instances, whether the Thai government takes an intimate position on it or not. Faith remains a link to the personal lives of common citizens and royalty alike. King Bhumibol's funeral on October 14, 2016 featured traditional Buddhist funeral rites with the ritualistic bathing of the king's body and the chanting of orange-robed monks. Adding to this ceremonious burial, his body resided in the Temple of the Emerald Buddha so that people could pay their respects to the revered king, who provided stability for his country for 70 years. Though the king in Thailand did not hold any true, legislative power, he was a reverential symbol for the people of the country. His majesty's death occurred at a moment of tension in the country as a number of attacks rocked Thailand and has only caused this pressure to spill-over. Religion is something that connects people in Thailand yet, at the same time, can be a divisive element as is evident from attacks that have occurred in the nation over the last few years.

In the span of less than a day between August 11th and 12th of 2016, 11 bombings hit five provinces in Thailand, killing at least four Thai nationals and injuring 36. These bombings occurred almost a year after one of the most devastating attacks in Thai history in Bangkok, which killed 20 people and wounded 125 more. What's more, these attacks coincided with the Queen Sirikit's birthday. On August 17, 2015, Uighur militants splintered the Thai state as they bombed the Erawan Shrine. Though the motives for the attack were more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees, the targeting of the temple was calculated: not only is the area around the shrine a densely populated area but also, it is frequented by many tourists. These acts of terrorism that assail the kingdom have left many Thais scared and unsure in a time, without a unifying leader. Known epithetically as the "land of smiles," Thailand has had little to smile about of late.

In light of this tumultuous time in the nation's history, religious institutions like the White Dragon Temple became integral in steadying the country's course. Through the diligent service that the temple provides for the community, it is a rallying point for many frightened Thais. See Knok, the central spiritual leader in the temple, and his followers have proved to be a "stabilizing element in the wake of the King's death," especially in Sri Racha, by continuing with their public works projects - providing educational help, burial services, food distribution, and a variety of other support structures. These actions from local community leaders have started to mend the fractures that occur on a national level.

I returned to Thailand in August of 2016, during the bombings in the southern provinces of the country. On one day during this visit, I bagged fruit and food for followers and local community members alike. The cadence of shifting palates of food and thump of vegetables into bags kept time with my human tempo. With each bag I loaded onto the palates, I could measure the burden on the community of Sri Racha lift slightly. In the glimmering eyes of the young men that I worked with, I could see the brightness of Thailand's future. Beneath me, I could feel the flexing and contracting of a nation, not torn by conflict but ready to rebuild and strive onward if only for a moment.

Q. Which of the following questions cannot be answered on the basis of the information given in the passage?

Detailed Solution for CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 6
A can be answered from the information given in the second paragraph, which tells us about the presence of numerous Buddhist temples, which would show a physical presence of religion in the community. B can be answered from the info given in the fourth paragraph, which tells us that the king's death occurred at a moment of tension. The paragraph then goes into the details of this moment of tension. D can be answered from the information given in the fifth paragraph, which tells us that the attack was "more aimed at the states' repatriation of Uighur refugees". C cannot be answered from the passage, as the only mention of religion and tourism is made in the third paragraph, which simply states that Buddhism is an important tourist element, but does not venture into the details of how it is so. C is the right answer.
CAT Mock Test - 17 - Question 7