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Test: Criminal Law - 2


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50 Questions MCQ Test Legal Reasoning for CLAT | Test: Criminal Law - 2

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Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 1

Principle: Whoever, by deceiving any person, fraudulently or dishonestly induces the person so deceived to deliver any property to any person, or to consent that any person shall retain any property, or intentionally induces the person so deceived to do or omit to do anything which he would not do or omit if he were not so deceived, and which act or omission causes or is likely to cause damage or harm to that person in body, mind reputation or property, is said to "cheat".

Explanation: A dishonest concealment of fact is a deception with the meaning of this section.

Facts: A, by falsely pretending to be in Civil Service, intentionally deceives Z, and thus dishonestly induces Z to let him have on credit goods for which he does not mean to pay.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 2

Principle: Whoever, by deceiving any person, fraudulently or dishonestly induces the person so deceived to deliver any property to any person, or to consent that any person shall retain any property, or intentionally induces the person so deceived to do or omit to do anything which he would not do or omit if he were not so deceived, and which act or omission causes or is likely to cause damage or harm to that person in body, mind reputation or property, is said to "cheat".

Explanation: A dishonest concealment of fact is a deception with the meaning of this section.

Facts: A, by pledging as diamonds articles which he knows are not diamonds, intentionally deceives Z, and thereby dishonestly induces Z to lend money

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 3

Principle: Whoever, by deceiving any person, fraudulently or dishonestly induces the person so deceived to deliver any property to any person, or to consent that any person shall retain any property, or intentionally induces the person so deceived to do or omit to do anything which he would not do or omit if he were not so deceived, and which act or omission causes or is likely to cause damage or harm to that person in body, mind reputation or property, is said to "cheat".

Explanation: A dishonest concealment of fact is a deception with the meaning of this section.

Facts: A sells and conveys an estate to B. A, knowing that in consequence of such sale he has no right to the property, sells or mortgages the same to Z, without disclosing the fact of the previous sale and conveyance to B, and receives the purchase or mortgage money from Z.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 4

Principle: A person is said to "cheat by personation" if he cheats by pretending to be some other person, or by knowingly substituting one person for another, or representing that he or any other person is a person other than he or such other person really is. 

Facts: A cheats B by pretending to be a certain rich banker of the same name 

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 5

Principle: A person is said to "cheat by personation" if he cheats by pretending to be some other person, or by knowingly substituting one person for another, or representing that he or any other person is a person other than he or such other person really is. 

Facts: A cheats by pretending to be B, a person who is deceased. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 5

Cheating by personation. 416. A person is said to "cheat by personation" if hecheats by pretending to be some other person, or by knowingly substituting one person for another, or representing that he or any other person is a person other than he or such other person really is.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 6

Principle: A person is said to "cheat by personation" if he cheats by pretending to be some other person, or by knowingly substituting one person for another, or representing that he or any other person is a person other than he or such other person really is.

Facts: Anil called at the houses of a number of persons and contracted with them to make paintings from photographs. He obtained payments in advance but did not work in any case and it appeared that he never had any intention of doing any work.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 7

Principle: Whoever with intent to cause, knowing that he is likely to cause wrongful loss or damage to the public or to any person, causes the destruction of any property, or any such change in any property or in the situation thereof as destroys or diminishes its value or utility, or affects it injuriously, commits "mischief".

Facts: Dinesh, stopped supply of water to his neighbor Suresh flat through operation of wrench value key and thereby, turning the main pipe outside the storage reservoir due to which neighbor was debarred from the supply of water in his flat. 

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 8

Principle: Whoever with intent to cause, knowing that he is likely to cause wrongful loss or damage to the public or to any person, causes the destruction of any property, or any such change in any property or in the situation thereof as destroys or diminishes its value or utility, or affects it injuriously, commits "mischief".

Facts: A voluntarily throws into a river a ring belonging to Z, with the intention of thereby causing wrongful loss to Z. 

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 9

Principle: Whoever with intent to cause, knowing that he is likely to cause wrongful loss or damage to the public or to any person, causes the destruction of any property, or any such change in any property or in the situation thereof as destroys or diminishes its value or utility, or affects it injuriously, commits "mischief".

Facts: A causes cattle to enter upon a field belonging to Z, intending to cause and knowing that he is likely to cause damage to Z's crop.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 10

Principle: Whoever with intent to cause, knowing that he is likely to cause wrongful loss or damage to the public or to any person, causes the destruction of any property, or any such change in any property or in the situation thereof as destroys or diminishes its value or utility, or affects it injuriously, commits "mischief".

Facts: Raman voluntarily throws outside from the window of the bus a wallet belongs to Taran containing cash and other important documents having Driving Licence, Aadhar card and other documents. 

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 11

Principle: Whoever enters into or upon property in the possession of another with intent to commit an offence or to intimidate, insult or annoy any person in possession of such property, or having lawfully entered into or upon such property, unlawfully remains therewith intent thereby to intimidate, insult or annoy any such person, or with intent to commit an offence, is said to commit "criminal trespass".

Principle: Whoever commits criminal trespass by entering into or remaining in any building, tent or vessel used as a human dwelling or any building, used as a place for worship, or as a place for the custody of property, is said to commit "house trespass". 

Explanation: The introduction of any part of the criminal trespasser's body is entering sufficient to constitute house-trespass. 

Principle: A person is said to commit "house-breaking" who commits house-trespass if he effects his entrance into the house or any part of it in any of the six ways hereinafter described; or if, being in the house or any part of it for the purpose of committing an offence, or, having committed an offence therein, he quits the house or any part of it in any of such six ways, that is to say:--

Firstly--If he enters or quits through a passage made by himself, or by any abettor of the house-trespass, in order to the committing of the house-trespass.

Secondly--If he enters or quits through any passage not intended by any person, other than himself or an abettor of the offence, for human entrance; or through any passage to which he has obtained access by scaling or climbing over any wall or building.

Thirdly--If he enters or quits through any passage which he or any abettor of the house-trespass has opened, in order to the committing of the house-trespass by any means by which that passage was not intended by the occupier of the house to be opened.

Fourthly--If he enters or quits by opening any lock in order to the committing of the house-trespass, or in order to the quitting of the house after a house-trespass.

Fifthly--If he effects his entrance or departure by using criminal force or committing an assault, or by threatening any person with assault.

Sixthly-- If he enters or quits by any passage which he knows to have been fastened against such entrance or departure, and to have been unfastened by himself or by an abettor of the house-trespass.

Facts: A commits house-trespass by making hole through the wall of Z's house, and putting his hand through the aperture.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 12

Principle: Whoever enters into or upon property in the possession of another with intent to commit an offence or to intimidate, insult or annoy any person in possession of such property, or having lawfully entered into or upon such property, unlawfully remains therewith intent thereby to intimidate, insult or annoy any such person, or with intent to commit an offence, is said to commit "criminal trespass".

Principle: Whoever commits criminal trespass by entering into or remaining in any building, tent or vessel used as a human dwelling or any building, used as a place for worship, or as a place for the custody of property, is said to commit "house trespass". 

Explanation: The introduction of any part of the criminal trespasser's body is entering sufficient to constitute house-trespass. 

Principle: A person is said to commit "house-breaking" who commits house-trespass if he effects his entrance into the house or any part of it in any of the six ways hereinafter described; or if, being in the house or any part of it for the purpose of committing an offence, or, having committed an offence therein, he quits the house or any part of it in any of such six ways, that is to say:--

Firstly--If he enters or quits through a passage made by himself, or by any abettor of the house-trespass, in order to the committing of the house-trespass.

Secondly--If he enters or quits through any passage not intended by any person, other than himself or an abettor of the offence, for human entrance; or through any passage to which he has obtained access by scaling or climbing over any wall or building.

Thirdly--If he enters or quits through any passage which he or any abettor of the house-trespass has opened, in order to the committing of the house-trespass by any means by which that passage was not intended by the occupier of the house to be opened.

Fourthly--If he enters or quits by opening any lock in order to the committing of the house-trespass, or in order to the quitting of the house after a house-trespass.

Fifthly--If he effects his entrance or departure by using criminal force or committing an assault, or by threatening any person with assault.

Sixthly-- If he enters or quits by any passage which he knows to have been fastened against such entrance or departure, and to have been unfastened by himself or by an abettor of the house-trespass.

Facts: Ishan commits house-trespass by entering Anuj house through a window.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 13

Principle: Whoever enters into or upon property in the possession of another with intent to commit an offence or to intimidate, insult or annoy any person in possession of such property, or having lawfully entered into or upon such property, unlawfully remains therewith intent thereby to intimidate, insult or annoy any such person, or with intent to commit an offence, is said to commit "criminal trespass".

Principle: Whoever commits criminal trespass by entering into or remaining in any building, tent or vessel used as a human dwelling or any building, used as a place for worship, or as a place for the custody of property, is said to commit "house trespass". 

Explanation: The introduction of any part of the criminal trespasser's body is entering sufficient to constitute house-trespass. 

Principle: A person is said to commit "house-breaking" who commits house-trespass if he effects his entrance into the house or any part of it in any of the six ways hereinafter described; or if, being in the house or any part of it for the purpose of committing an offence, or, having committed an offence therein, he quits the house or any part of it in any of such six ways, that is to say:--

Firstly--If he enters or quits through a passage made by himself, or by any abettor of the house-trespass, in order to the committing of the house-trespass.

Secondly--If he enters or quits through any passage not intended by any person, other than himself or an abettor of the offence, for human entrance; or through any passage to which he has obtained access by scaling or climbing over any wall or building.

Thirdly--If he enters or quits through any passage which he or any abettor of the house-trespass has opened, in order to the committing of the house-trespass by any means by which that passage was not intended by the occupier of the house to be opened.

Fourthly--If he enters or quits by opening any lock in order to the committing of the house-trespass, or in order to the quitting of the house after a house-trespass.

Fifthly--If he effects his entrance or departure by using criminal force or committing an assault, or by threatening any person with assault.

Sixthly-- If he enters or quits by any passage which he knows to have been fastened against such entrance or departure, and to have been unfastened by himself or by an abettor of the house-trespass.

Facts: Sam commits house-trespass by entering Binny house through the door, having lifted a latch by putting a wire though a hole in the door.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 14

Principle: Whoever makes any false document or false electronic record or part of a document or electronic record, with intent to cause damage or injury, to the public or to any person, or to support any claim or title, or to cause any person to part with property, or to enter into any express or implied contract, or with intent to commit fraud or that fraud may be committed, commits forgery.

Facts: A has a letter of credit upon B for rupees 10,000, written by Z. A, in order to defraud B, adds a cipher to the 10,000 and makes the sum 1,00,000/- intending that it may be delivered by B that Z so wrote the letter.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 15

Principle: Whoever makes any false document or false electronic record or part of a document or electronic record, with intent to cause damage or injury, to the public or to any person, or to support any claim or title, or to cause any person to part with property, or to enter into any express or implied contract, or with intent to commit fraud or that fraud may be committed, commits forgery.

Facts: A, without Z's authority, affixes Z's seal to a document purporting to be a conveyance of an estate from Z to A, with the intention of selling the estate to B, and thereby of obtaining from B the purchase money.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 16

Principle: Whoever makes any false document or false electronic record or part of a document or electronic record, with intent to cause damage or injury, to the public or to any person, or to support any claim or title, or to cause any person to part with property, or to enter into any express or implied contract, or with intent to commit fraud or that fraud may be committed, commits forgery.

Facts: Z's will contains these words "I direct that all my remaining property be equally divided between A, B and C" A dishonestly scratches out B's name, intending that it may be believed that the whole was left to himself and C.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 17

Principle: Whoever threatens another with any injury to his person, reputation or property, or to the person or reputation of any one in whom that person is interested, with intent to cause alarm to that person, or to cause that person to do any act which he is not legally bound to do, or to omit to do any act which that person is legally entitled to do, as the means of avoiding the execution of such threat, commits criminal intimidation.

Explanation: A threat to injure the reputation of any deceased person in whom the person threatened is interested, is within this section.

Facts: A, for the purpose of inducing B to desist from prosecuting a civil suit, threatens to burn B's house.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 18

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A makes an attempt to pick the pocket of Z by thrusting his hand into Z's pocket. A fails in the attempt in consequence of Z's having nothing in his pocket.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 19

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A shoots at the shadow of B.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 20

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A wants to kill B, so administered sugar mistaking it for poison.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 21

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A gives pills to a pregnant woman to procure abortion, but they have no effect because drug turns to be innocuous.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 22

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A intending to kill B, fires at B Coat hanging in his room mistaking it for B.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 23

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A administers to B, a drug with intent to made abortion, but the woman was not actually pregnant.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 24

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A intending to murder Z, buys a gun and loads it.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 25

Principle: Whoever attempts to commit an offence punishable by this Code with imprisonment for life or imprisonment, or to cause such an offence to be committed, and in such attempt does any act towards the commission of the offence, shall, where no express provision is made by this Code for the punishment of such attempt, be punished with imprisonment for any description provided for the offence, for a term which may extend to one-half of the imprisonment for life or, as the case may be, one half of the longest term of imprisonment provided for that offence, or with such fine as is provided for the offence, or with both.

Facts: A intending to murder Z, by poison, purchases poison and mixes the same with food which remains in A’s keeping with himself.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 26

Principle: Ignorance of Fact is excused but ignorance of law is no excuse.

Facts: X was a passenger from Zurich to Manila in a Swiss Plane. When the plane landed at the Airport of Bombay on 28 Nov. 1962 it was found on searching that X carried 34 kg of Gold Bars on his person and that he had not declared it in the ‘Manifest for Transit’. On 26th Nov. 1962 the Government of India had issued a notification modifying its earlier exemption, making it mandatory now that the gold must be declared in the “Manifest” of the aircraft.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 27

Assertion (A): X, because of unsound state of mind and not knowing the nature of the act, attacks Y, who in self defense and in order to ward off the attack, hits him thereby injuring him. Y has not committed an offence.

Reason (R): Y had a right of private defense against X under Section 98 of the Indian Penal Code.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 28

Y makes an attempt to steal some jewels by breaking open a box and finds, after opening the box, that there is no jewel in it. Choose the appropriate answer.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 29

PRINCIPLE: Nothing is an offence which is done by a person who, at the time of doing it, by reason of unsoundness of mind, is incapable of knowing the nature of the act, or that he is doing what is either wrong of contrary of law.

FACT: A takes his son B who is three years old, for a bath to the well. He throws his son inside the well so that he could have a good bath. After 10 minutes he also jumped in the well to take bath and take his son out of the well. Both were rescused by the villagers but his son was found dead.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 30

Principle: Ignorance of law is no excuse but ignorance of fact is excused

Facts: George was a passenger from Zurich to manila in a Swiss plane. When the plane landed at the airport at Bombay on 28th Nov. 1962 it was found on search that George carried 34 kg of gold bars in person and that he had not declared it in the manifest for transit. On 26th Nov. 1962 GOI issued a notification and modified its earlier exemption and now it is necessary that the gold must be declared in the manifest of the aircraft.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 31

Principle: Preparation is not an offence except the preparation of some special offences

Facts: A keeps poisoned halwa in his house, wishing to kill B whom he invited to a party and to who he wishes to give it. Unknown to A, his son takes the halwa and dies. In this case

Detailed Solution for Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 31

Rameshwar is liable for the murder under Section 300 IPC The reason is he poisoned the sweet dish with the intention of causing death.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 32

Assertion: Attempt to commit an offence though does not result in any harm should also be punished

Reason: A person who tries to cause a prohibited harm and fails is in terms of moral culpability not materially different from the person who tries and succeeds

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 33

A with an intention to pick pocket puts his hand into B’s pocket. B had a loaded pistol in his pocket. The thief touches the pistol and trigger goes on, whereby B is shot dead.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 34

Principle: Whoever, intending to take dishonestly any moveable property out of the possession of any person without that person's consent, moves that property in order to such taking, is said to commit theft

Facts: Ms. Y came to Ms. P’s house. When Ms. Y returned, she realized that Ms. P had left her pen in Ms. Y’s book.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 35

Principle: Every person has a right to defend his own person, property or possession against an immediate harm and to that end may use reasonable amount of force

Facts: X was passing by Y house. At that time Y dog ran out and bit X overcoat. X turned around and shot at the dog however the dog ran away while the dog was far away from X. X shot the dog dead as he believed that the dog had bitten other persons in the locality. Y filed a suit for damages as the dog was of a rare breed and worth Rs. 5000/-

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 36

Nothing which is not intended to cause death, is an offence by reason of any harm which it may cause, or be intended by the doer to cause, or be known by the doer to be likely to cause, to any person for whose benefit it is done in good faith, and who has given a consent, whether express or implied, to suffer that harm, or to take the risk of that harm.

Facts: A fake doctor operated on a man for internal piles by cutting them out with a kitchen ordinary knife. The man died of hemorrhage.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 37

Nothing which is not intended to cause death, is an offence by reason of any harm which it may cause, or be intended by the doer to cause, or be known by the doer to be likely to cause, to any person for whose benefit it is done in good faith, and who has given a consent, whether express or implied, to suffer that harm, or to take the risk of that harm.

Facts: Dr Mortimer performed a kidney operation upon James for removal of kidney stones. James was already affected by HIV. Dr Mortimer had warned James of all the possible risks. James, out of his own volition, decided to undertake the risks and signed a bond certifying the same. James died of hemorrhage as a result of the operation.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 38

Nothing which is not intended to cause death, is an offence by reason of any harm which it may cause, or be intended by the doer to cause, or be known by the doer to be likely to cause, to any person for whose benefit it is done in good faith, and who has given a consent, whether express or implied, to suffer that harm, or to take the risk of that harm.

In kidnapping, the consent of the minor is –

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 39

Principle 1: Every person has a right to defend his own body, and the body of any other person, against any offence affecting the human body. Nothing is an offence which is done in the exercise of the right of private defence.
Principle 2: The right of private defence of the body extends to the voluntary causing of death or of any other harm to the assailant, if the offence reasonably causes the apprehension that death, or grievous hurt will otherwise be the consequence of such assault. Also, if the assault is with the intention of committing rape, gratifying unnatural lust, kidnapping or abducting, or wrongfully confining a person under circumstances which may reasonably cause him to apprehend that he will be unable to have recourse to the public authorities for his release, he will have the right of private defence of the body extending to causing of death.
Principle 3: Nothing is an offence which is done by a person who, at the time of doing it, by reason of unsoundness of mind, is incapable of knowing the nature of the act.

Facts: Prateek, who is Prakha’s younger brother, under the influence of madness, attempts to kill Sachan, who is Prakha’s boyfriend. Prakha, not knowing how to react, and seeing Sachan helpless and on the verge of being murdered, hits on Prateek’s head with an antique metal vase. Prateek dies on the spot. Can Prakha claim the right of private defence of body?

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 40

Principle: Every person who commits an offence in the territory of India shall be guilty within the meaning of Indian Penal Code.

Facts: John, a citizen of France commits murder in Madras. In this case

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 41

Principle: Nothing is an offence which is done by accident, and without any criminal intention.

Facts: Aneez fires a revolver in the air. Ahmad, who is coming down by a parachute is hit and killed. In this case

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 42

Principle: Every person has a right to defend his own body and the body of any other person, against any offence committed by anybody.

Facts: Vasu, under the influence of madness, attempts to kill Venkatesh. Venkatesh, defending himself against Vasu's attacks, kills Vasu. In the present case,

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 43

Principle: A person who instigates another person to commit an offence is said to abet the said offence.

Facts: Vidhu instigates Bhaskar to murder Shobhit. Bhaskar, in pursuance of the instigation, stabs Shobhit. Shobhit subsequently recovers from the wound. In the present case

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 44

Principle: A person is guilty of cheating, when he fraudulently induces another person to deliver the latter's property to him.

Facts: Vimal falsely represented to Kamal, a shop owner that he was an officer from the Commercial Tax Department. While examining the accounts of the shop, Vimal showed interest in buying a microwave oven on instalment basis. Kamal readily agreed with the hope that he would get a favorable assessment from Vimal regards his tax liability. Vimal paid the first installment, took the microwave oven and disappeared from the scene. The police, however, managed to catch hold of Vimal and prosecute him for cheating.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 45

In which of the following cases has the supreme court allowed for passive euthanasia under certain circumstances?

Detailed Solution for Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 45

On 9 March 2018 the Supreme Court of India legalised passive euthanasia by means of the withdrawal of life support to patients in a permanent vegetative state. The decision was made as part of the verdict in a case involving Aruna Shanbaug, who had been in a Persistent Vegetative State (PVS) until her death in 2015.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 46

In which of the following cases mens rea is an essential ingredient?

Detailed Solution for Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 46

Mensrea means ‘guilty mind’ whereas actus reus means ‘guilty act’. The latin phrase, actus reus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea, means an act does not make a person guilty unless mind is also guilty.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 47

The right of private defence

Detailed Solution for Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 47

Right to self-defence forms an important part of the Indian Penal Code justifying a person's action to defend himself during an attack. Nothing, not even taking the assailant's life, is an offence when one is trying to save his own life. But this right is available only to the person attacked and not to the assailant because the aggressor forefeits his right to self-defence, a Bench comprising Justices A K Mathur and D K Jain has ruled. Misuse of this important right is reflected in many recent judgments. In all these cases, the assailant's plea of self-defence is based on the injuries they received during the process of attack on the victims, who tried to defend themselves causing small injuries to the aggressors.

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 48

The right of private defence of property

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 49

In which of the following cases did the Supreme court life the ban on dance bars imposed by state of Maharashtra?

Detailed Solution for Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 49

The correct answer is option A.

In 2005 the Maharashtra government had imposed a ban on dance performances in bars with the exception of hotels rated in 3 stars and above, as provided for, under section 33 A and 33 B of the Bombay Police Act. The Public rationale offered was that these performances were obscene and morally corrupt. All the dance performance licences were cancelled with the immediate effect resulting in unemployment of approx. 75,000 women workers which led the affected parties to file petitions in the Bombay High court

Test: Criminal Law - 2 - Question 50

Which one of the following Directive Principle is a socialistic principle?

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