English Full Test-3


40 Questions MCQ Test English for CLAT | English Full Test-3


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This mock test of English Full Test-3 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT English Full Test-3 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this English Full Test-3 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this English Full Test-3 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other English Full Test-3 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Democracy rests on a tension between two different principles. There are, on the one hand, the principles of equality before the law, or, more generally, of equality, and, on the other, what may be described as the leadership principle. The first give priority to rules and the second to persons. No matter how skillfully we contrive our schemes; there is a pint beyond which the one principle cannot be promoted without some sacrifice of the other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the great nineteenth century write on democracy, maintained that the age of democracy, whose birth he was witnessing, would be the age of mediocrity: in saying this he was thinking primarily of a regime of equality governed by impersonal rules. Despite his strong attachment to democracy, he took great pains to point out what he believed to be its negative side: a dead level plane of achievement in practically every sphere of life. The age of democracy would, in his view, he an unheroic age; there would not be room in it for either heroes or hero-worshippers.

But modern democracies have not been able to do without heroes: this too was foreseen, with much misgiving, by Tocqueville. Tocqueville viewed this misgiving because he believed, rightly or wrongly, that unlike in aristocratic societies, there was no proper place in a democracy for heroes, and hence when they arose, they would sooner or later turn into despots. Whether they require heroes or not, democracies certainly require leaders, and, in the contemporary age, need to breed them in great profusion; the problem is to know what to do with them.

In a world preoccupied with scientific rationality, the advantages of a system based on an impersonal rule of law should be a recommendation with everybody. There is something orderly and predictable about such a system. When life is lived mainly in small, self-contained communities, men are able to take finer personal distinctions into account in dealing with their fellow men. They’re unable to do this in a large and amorphous society, and organized living would be impossible here without a system of impersonal rule. Above all, such a system guarantees a kind of equality to the extent that everybody, no matter in what station of life, is bound by the same explicit, often written rules, and nobody is above them.

But a system governed solely by impersonal rules can at best ensure order and stability; it cannot create any shining vision of a future in which mere formal equality will be replaced by real equality and fellowship. A world governed by impersonal rules cannot easily change itself, or when it does, the change is so gradual as to make the basic or fundamental change, a push is needed from within, a kind of individual initiative which will create new rules, new terms and conditions of file.

The issue of leadership thus acquired crucial significance in the context of change. If the modern age is preoccupied with scientific rationality, it is no less preoccupied with change. To accept what exists on its terms is traditional, not modern, and it may be all very well to appreciate tradition in music, dance and drama, but for society as a while, the choice has already been made in favour of modernization and development. Moreover, in some countries, the gap between ideal and reality has become so great that the argument of development and change is now irresistible.

In these countries no argument for development has greater appeal or urgency than the one which shows development to be the condition for the mitigation, if not the elimination, of inequality. There is something contradictory about the very presence of large inequalities in a society which professes to be democratic. It does not take people too long to realize that democracy by itself can guarantee only formally equality, beyond this; it can only whet people’s appetite for real or substantive equality. From this arises continued preoccupation with plans and schemes that will help to bridge the gap between the ideal of equality and the reality which is so contrary to it.

When pre-existing rules give no clear directions of change, leadership comes into its own. Every democracy invests its leadership with a measure of charisma, and expects from it a corresponding measure of energy and vitality. Now, the greater the urge for change in a society, the stronger the appeal of a dynamic leadership in it. A dynamic leadership seeks to free itself from the constraints of existing rules; in a sense that is the test of its dynamism. In this process, it may take a turn at which it ceases to regard itself as being bound by these rules, placing itself above them. There is always a tension between ‘charisma’ and ‘discipline’ and in the case of a democratic leadership, puts forward revolutionary claims, the tension tends to be resolved at the expense of discipline.

Characteristically, the legitimacy of such a leadership rests on its claim to be able to abolish or at least substantially reduce the existing inequalities in society. From the argument that format equality or equality before the law is but a limited good, it is often one short step to the argument that it is a hindrance or an obstacle to the establishment of real or substantive equality. The conflict between a ‘progressive’ executive and a ‘conservative’ judiciary is but one aspect of this larger problem. This conflict naturally acquires added piquancy when the executive is elected and the judiciary appointed.

Q.

Dynamic leaders are needed in democracies because

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Democracy rests on a tension between two different principles. There are, on the one hand, the principles of equality before the law, or, more generally, of equality, and, on the other, what may be described as the leadership principle. The first give priority to rules and the second to persons. No matter how skillfully we contrive our schemes; there is a pint beyond which the one principle cannot be promoted without some sacrifice of the other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the great nineteenth century write on democracy, maintained that the age of democracy, whose birth he was witnessing, would be the age of mediocrity: in saying this he was thinking primarily of a regime of equality governed by impersonal rules. Despite his strong attachment to democracy, he took great pains to point out what he believed to be its negative side: a dead level plane of achievement in practically every sphere of life. The age of democracy would, in his view, he an unheroic age; there would not be room in it for either heroes or hero-worshippers.

But modern democracies have not been able to do without heroes: this too was foreseen, with much misgiving, by Tocqueville. Tocqueville viewed this misgiving because he believed, rightly or wrongly, that unlike in aristocratic societies, there was no proper place in a democracy for heroes, and hence when they arose, they would sooner or later turn into despots. Whether they require heroes or not, democracies certainly require leaders, and, in the contemporary age, need to breed them in great profusion; the problem is to know what to do with them.

In a world preoccupied with scientific rationality, the advantages of a system based on an impersonal rule of law should be a recommendation with everybody. There is something orderly and predictable about such a system. When life is lived mainly in small, self-contained communities, men are able to take finer personal distinctions into account in dealing with their fellow men. They’re unable to do this in a large and amorphous society, and organized living would be impossible here without a system of impersonal rule. Above all, such a system guarantees a kind of equality to the extent that everybody, no matter in what station of life, is bound by the same explicit, often written rules, and nobody is above them.

But a system governed solely by impersonal rules can at best ensure order and stability; it cannot create any shining vision of a future in which mere formal equality will be replaced by real equality and fellowship. A world governed by impersonal rules cannot easily change itself, or when it does, the change is so gradual as to make the basic or fundamental change, a push is needed from within, a kind of individual initiative which will create new rules, new terms and conditions of file.

The issue of leadership thus acquired crucial significance in the context of change. If the modern age is preoccupied with scientific rationality, it is no less preoccupied with change. To accept what exists on its terms is traditional, not modern, and it may be all very well to appreciate tradition in music, dance and drama, but for society as a while, the choice has already been made in favour of modernization and development. Moreover, in some countries, the gap between ideal and reality has become so great that the argument of development and change is now irresistible.

In these countries no argument for development has greater appeal or urgency than the one which shows development to be the condition for the mitigation, if not the elimination, of inequality. There is something contradictory about the very presence of large inequalities in a society which professes to be democratic. It does not take people too long to realize that democracy by itself can guarantee only formally equality, beyond this; it can only whet people’s appetite for real or substantive equality. From this arises continued preoccupation with plans and schemes that will help to bridge the gap between the ideal of equality and the reality which is so contrary to it.

When pre-existing rules give no clear directions of change, leadership comes into its own. Every democracy invests its leadership with a measure of charisma, and expects from it a corresponding measure of energy and vitality. Now, the greater the urge for change in a society, the stronger the appeal of a dynamic leadership in it. A dynamic leadership seeks to free itself from the constraints of existing rules; in a sense that is the test of its dynamism. In this process, it may take a turn at which it ceases to regard itself as being bound by these rules, placing itself above them. There is always a tension between ‘charisma’ and ‘discipline’ and in the case of a democratic leadership, puts forward revolutionary claims, the tension tends to be resolved at the expense of discipline.

Characteristically, the legitimacy of such a leadership rests on its claim to be able to abolish or at least substantially reduce the existing inequalities in society. From the argument that format equality or equality before the law is but a limited good, it is often one short step to the argument that it is a hindrance or an obstacle to the establishment of real or substantive equality. The conflict between a ‘progressive’ executive and a ‘conservative’ judiciary is but one aspect of this larger problem. This conflict naturally acquires added piquancy when the executive is elected and the judiciary appointed.

Q.

What possible factor would a dynamic leader consider a ‘hindrance’ in achieving the development goals of a nation?

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Democracy rests on a tension between two different principles. There are, on the one hand, the principles of equality before the law, or, more generally, of equality, and, on the other, what may be described as the leadership principle. The first give priority to rules and the second to persons. No matter how skillfully we contrive our schemes; there is a pint beyond which the one principle cannot be promoted without some sacrifice of the other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the great nineteenth century write on democracy, maintained that the age of democracy, whose birth he was witnessing, would be the age of mediocrity: in saying this he was thinking primarily of a regime of equality governed by impersonal rules. Despite his strong attachment to democracy, he took great pains to point out what he believed to be its negative side: a dead level plane of achievement in practically every sphere of life. The age of democracy would, in his view, he an unheroic age; there would not be room in it for either heroes or hero-worshippers.

But modern democracies have not been able to do without heroes: this too was foreseen, with much misgiving, by Tocqueville. Tocqueville viewed this misgiving because he believed, rightly or wrongly, that unlike in aristocratic societies, there was no proper place in a democracy for heroes, and hence when they arose, they would sooner or later turn into despots. Whether they require heroes or not, democracies certainly require leaders, and, in the contemporary age, need to breed them in great profusion; the problem is to know what to do with them.

In a world preoccupied with scientific rationality, the advantages of a system based on an impersonal rule of law should be a recommendation with everybody. There is something orderly and predictable about such a system. When life is lived mainly in small, self-contained communities, men are able to take finer personal distinctions into account in dealing with their fellow men. They’re unable to do this in a large and amorphous society, and organized living would be impossible here without a system of impersonal rule. Above all, such a system guarantees a kind of equality to the extent that everybody, no matter in what station of life, is bound by the same explicit, often written rules, and nobody is above them.

But a system governed solely by impersonal rules can at best ensure order and stability; it cannot create any shining vision of a future in which mere formal equality will be replaced by real equality and fellowship. A world governed by impersonal rules cannot easily change itself, or when it does, the change is so gradual as to make the basic or fundamental change, a push is needed from within, a kind of individual initiative which will create new rules, new terms and conditions of file.

The issue of leadership thus acquired crucial significance in the context of change. If the modern age is preoccupied with scientific rationality, it is no less preoccupied with change. To accept what exists on its terms is traditional, not modern, and it may be all very well to appreciate tradition in music, dance and drama, but for society as a while, the choice has already been made in favour of modernization and development. Moreover, in some countries, the gap between ideal and reality has become so great that the argument of development and change is now irresistible.

In these countries no argument for development has greater appeal or urgency than the one which shows development to be the condition for the mitigation, if not the elimination, of inequality. There is something contradictory about the very presence of large inequalities in a society which professes to be democratic. It does not take people too long to realize that democracy by itself can guarantee only formally equality, beyond this; it can only whet people’s appetite for real or substantive equality. From this arises continued preoccupation with plans and schemes that will help to bridge the gap between the ideal of equality and the reality which is so contrary to it.

When pre-existing rules give no clear directions of change, leadership comes into its own. Every democracy invests its leadership with a measure of charisma, and expects from it a corresponding measure of energy and vitality. Now, the greater the urge for change in a society, the stronger the appeal of a dynamic leadership in it. A dynamic leadership seeks to free itself from the constraints of existing rules; in a sense that is the test of its dynamism. In this process, it may take a turn at which it ceases to regard itself as being bound by these rules, placing itself above them. There is always a tension between ‘charisma’ and ‘discipline’ and in the case of a democratic leadership, puts forward revolutionary claims, the tension tends to be resolved at the expense of discipline.

Characteristically, the legitimacy of such a leadership rests on its claim to be able to abolish or at least substantially reduce the existing inequalities in society. From the argument that format equality or equality before the law is but a limited good, it is often one short step to the argument that it is a hindrance or an obstacle to the establishment of real or substantive equality. The conflict between a ‘progressive’ executive and a ‘conservative’ judiciary is but one aspect of this larger problem. This conflict naturally acquires added piquancy when the executive is elected and the judiciary appointed.

Q.

Which of the following four statements can be inferred from the above passage?
I. Scientific rationality is an essential feature of modernity.
II. Scientific rationality results in the development of impersonal rules.
III. Modernisation and development have been chosen over traditional music, dance and drama.
IV. Democracies aspire to achieve substantive equality.

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Democracy rests on a tension between two different principles. There are, on the one hand, the principles of equality before the law, or, more generally, of equality, and, on the other, what may be described as the leadership principle. The first give priority to rules and the second to persons. No matter how skillfully we contrive our schemes; there is a pint beyond which the one principle cannot be promoted without some sacrifice of the other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the great nineteenth century write on democracy, maintained that the age of democracy, whose birth he was witnessing, would be the age of mediocrity: in saying this he was thinking primarily of a regime of equality governed by impersonal rules. Despite his strong attachment to democracy, he took great pains to point out what he believed to be its negative side: a dead level plane of achievement in practically every sphere of life. The age of democracy would, in his view, he an unheroic age; there would not be room in it for either heroes or hero-worshippers.

But modern democracies have not been able to do without heroes: this too was foreseen, with much misgiving, by Tocqueville. Tocqueville viewed this misgiving because he believed, rightly or wrongly, that unlike in aristocratic societies, there was no proper place in a democracy for heroes, and hence when they arose, they would sooner or later turn into despots. Whether they require heroes or not, democracies certainly require leaders, and, in the contemporary age, need to breed them in great profusion; the problem is to know what to do with them.

In a world preoccupied with scientific rationality, the advantages of a system based on an impersonal rule of law should be a recommendation with everybody. There is something orderly and predictable about such a system. When life is lived mainly in small, self-contained communities, men are able to take finer personal distinctions into account in dealing with their fellow men. They’re unable to do this in a large and amorphous society, and organized living would be impossible here without a system of impersonal rule. Above all, such a system guarantees a kind of equality to the extent that everybody, no matter in what station of life, is bound by the same explicit, often written rules, and nobody is above them.

But a system governed solely by impersonal rules can at best ensure order and stability; it cannot create any shining vision of a future in which mere formal equality will be replaced by real equality and fellowship. A world governed by impersonal rules cannot easily change itself, or when it does, the change is so gradual as to make the basic or fundamental change, a push is needed from within, a kind of individual initiative which will create new rules, new terms and conditions of file.

The issue of leadership thus acquired crucial significance in the context of change. If the modern age is preoccupied with scientific rationality, it is no less preoccupied with change. To accept what exists on its terms is traditional, not modern, and it may be all very well to appreciate tradition in music, dance and drama, but for society as a while, the choice has already been made in favour of modernization and development. Moreover, in some countries, the gap between ideal and reality has become so great that the argument of development and change is now irresistible.

In these countries no argument for development has greater appeal or urgency than the one which shows development to be the condition for the mitigation, if not the elimination, of inequality. There is something contradictory about the very presence of large inequalities in a society which professes to be democratic. It does not take people too long to realize that democracy by itself can guarantee only formally equality, beyond this; it can only whet people’s appetite for real or substantive equality. From this arises continued preoccupation with plans and schemes that will help to bridge the gap between the ideal of equality and the reality which is so contrary to it.

When pre-existing rules give no clear directions of change, leadership comes into its own. Every democracy invests its leadership with a measure of charisma, and expects from it a corresponding measure of energy and vitality. Now, the greater the urge for change in a society, the stronger the appeal of a dynamic leadership in it. A dynamic leadership seeks to free itself from the constraints of existing rules; in a sense that is the test of its dynamism. In this process, it may take a turn at which it ceases to regard itself as being bound by these rules, placing itself above them. There is always a tension between ‘charisma’ and ‘discipline’ and in the case of a democratic leadership, puts forward revolutionary claims, the tension tends to be resolved at the expense of discipline.

Characteristically, the legitimacy of such a leadership rests on its claim to be able to abolish or at least substantially reduce the existing inequalities in society. From the argument that format equality or equality before the law is but a limited good, it is often one short step to the argument that it is a hindrance or an obstacle to the establishment of real or substantive equality. The conflict between a ‘progressive’ executive and a ‘conservative’ judiciary is but one aspect of this larger problem. This conflict naturally acquires added piquancy when the executive is elected and the judiciary appointed.

Q.

Tocqueville believed that the age of democracy would be an un-heroic age because

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Democracy rests on a tension between two different principles. There are, on the one hand, the principles of equality before the law, or, more generally, of equality, and, on the other, what may be described as the leadership principle. The first give priority to rules and the second to persons. No matter how skillfully we contrive our schemes; there is a pint beyond which the one principle cannot be promoted without some sacrifice of the other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the great nineteenth century write on democracy, maintained that the age of democracy, whose birth he was witnessing, would be the age of mediocrity: in saying this he was thinking primarily of a regime of equality governed by impersonal rules. Despite his strong attachment to democracy, he took great pains to point out what he believed to be its negative side: a dead level plane of achievement in practically every sphere of life. The age of democracy would, in his view, he an unheroic age; there would not be room in it for either heroes or hero-worshippers.

But modern democracies have not been able to do without heroes: this too was foreseen, with much misgiving, by Tocqueville. Tocqueville viewed this misgiving because he believed, rightly or wrongly, that unlike in aristocratic societies, there was no proper place in a democracy for heroes, and hence when they arose, they would sooner or later turn into despots. Whether they require heroes or not, democracies certainly require leaders, and, in the contemporary age, need to breed them in great profusion; the problem is to know what to do with them.

In a world preoccupied with scientific rationality, the advantages of a system based on an impersonal rule of law should be a recommendation with everybody. There is something orderly and predictable about such a system. When life is lived mainly in small, self-contained communities, men are able to take finer personal distinctions into account in dealing with their fellow men. They’re unable to do this in a large and amorphous society, and organized living would be impossible here without a system of impersonal rule. Above all, such a system guarantees a kind of equality to the extent that everybody, no matter in what station of life, is bound by the same explicit, often written rules, and nobody is above them.

But a system governed solely by impersonal rules can at best ensure order and stability; it cannot create any shining vision of a future in which mere formal equality will be replaced by real equality and fellowship. A world governed by impersonal rules cannot easily change itself, or when it does, the change is so gradual as to make the basic or fundamental change, a push is needed from within, a kind of individual initiative which will create new rules, new terms and conditions of file.

The issue of leadership thus acquired crucial significance in the context of change. If the modern age is preoccupied with scientific rationality, it is no less preoccupied with change. To accept what exists on its terms is traditional, not modern, and it may be all very well to appreciate tradition in music, dance and drama, but for society as a while, the choice has already been made in favour of modernization and development. Moreover, in some countries, the gap between ideal and reality has become so great that the argument of development and change is now irresistible.

In these countries no argument for development has greater appeal or urgency than the one which shows development to be the condition for the mitigation, if not the elimination, of inequality. There is something contradictory about the very presence of large inequalities in a society which professes to be democratic. It does not take people too long to realize that democracy by itself can guarantee only formally equality, beyond this; it can only whet people’s appetite for real or substantive equality. From this arises continued preoccupation with plans and schemes that will help to bridge the gap between the ideal of equality and the reality which is so contrary to it.

When pre-existing rules give no clear directions of change, leadership comes into its own. Every democracy invests its leadership with a measure of charisma, and expects from it a corresponding measure of energy and vitality. Now, the greater the urge for change in a society, the stronger the appeal of a dynamic leadership in it. A dynamic leadership seeks to free itself from the constraints of existing rules; in a sense that is the test of its dynamism. In this process, it may take a turn at which it ceases to regard itself as being bound by these rules, placing itself above them. There is always a tension between ‘charisma’ and ‘discipline’ and in the case of a democratic leadership, puts forward revolutionary claims, the tension tends to be resolved at the expense of discipline.

Characteristically, the legitimacy of such a leadership rests on its claim to be able to abolish or at least substantially reduce the existing inequalities in society. From the argument that format equality or equality before the law is but a limited good, it is often one short step to the argument that it is a hindrance or an obstacle to the establishment of real or substantive equality. The conflict between a ‘progressive’ executive and a ‘conservative’ judiciary is but one aspect of this larger problem. This conflict naturally acquires added piquancy when the executive is elected and the judiciary appointed.

Q.

Key argument the author is making is that

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions (Q. 6 - 15): In the following passage there are blanks each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below four or five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 6

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 6

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 7

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 8

Solution:

The correct option is B.
Carriage is a wheeled vehicle for conveying persons, as one drawn by horses and designed for comfort and elegance.

QUESTION: 9

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 9

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 10

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 11

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 12

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 13

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 14

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

Science (6)           the average man and women in two ways already. He or she benefits by its (7)                 driving in a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn (8)             , being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a priest or a (9)              , being (10)                   with an automatic pistol or a sell in (11)                  of a dagger or battle-axe. It also affects his or her opinions. Almost everyone believes that the earth is (12)                , and the heavens nearly (13)                  , instead of solid. And we are beginning to believe in our animal (14)                    and the possibility of vast improvements in (15)                 nature by biological methods.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 15

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Directions (Q. 16 - 20): Fill in the Blanks with Appropriate Words

He is bound to succeed because his ……… nature will not permit him to ……..

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

The partners broke off as they found each other ………… of ……….. breach of promise.

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

The factory workers ………. threatened to launch an indefinite strike from next month to ………. their demands.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
‘From next month’ in the sentence clarifies that the action is taking place in the present. Thus D is the most suitable answer.

QUESTION: 19

The region is likely to witness a …….. up as competition for its precious resources ………….

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

The region is likely to witness a …….. up as competition for its precious resources ………….

Solution:

The correct option is B.
 if you read the sentence after knowing the root of these words you will be able to fit that word in that sentence as here "soar up" suits the most and same with the "progresses" and then you will be able to know which is most appropriate.

QUESTION: 21

Directions (Q. 21 - 25): In the sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in underline letter. For each underline part four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the underline part.

Q. The inspector was a vigilant young man.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

The resignation of the Chief Minister is intriguing.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
Intriguing means  especially when you consider that intrigue is usually a combination of factors. The best I could define intrigue is a person's tendency to draw attention to themselves in a way that inspires curiosity.

QUESTION: 23

India has made spectacular progress in Science and technology.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The acerbic remarks of the manager were unwarranted.

Solution:
QUESTION: 25

In modern hospitals, computers check the patients before they see the doctor.

Solution:

The correct option is C.
 Doctors often require the information about a patient's family history, physical ailments, already diagnosed diseases and prescribed medicines.
 

QUESTION: 26

Directions (Q. 26 - 30): Fill in the Blanks

The foundation of all civilizations and societies is the ability of humans to ……….. with each other

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

He was too ……… to make a statement before the Principal

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

This is a temporary ……….. we must find another tomorrow for the problem

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

As the news of the natural ……….. spread offers of relief poured in

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

He……… in wearing the old fashioned coat inspite of his wife’s disapproval

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Directions (Q. 31 - 35): In each of the following sentences, four options are given. You are required to identify the best way of writing the sentence in the context of the correct usage of standard written English. While doing so you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.

Q.

Anyone interested in flying planes can learn much if you have access to a flight simulation machine.

Solution:
QUESTION: 32

No officer bad ought to be put into a situation where he has to choose between his lover for this family and the responsibilities accompanying his duty.

Solution:
QUESTION: 33

He being a realist, the detective could not accept the statement of the accused that UFOs had caused the disturbance.

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

The reason I came late to office today is because my car broke down.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
Because it is used to explain the reason, here already in the starting of the sentence it is given that ‘the reason’. So there is no need of ‘because’.

QUESTION: 35

The shopkeepers hadn’t hardly any of these kind of goods.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
This corrects the double negative (hadn't hardly) and also uses those with kinds correctly.

QUESTION: 36

Directions (36-40): In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.

Q. The state of complete continence on the part of a woman

Solution:

The correct option is A.
A state of complete continence- Celibacy; the state of abstaining from marriage and sexual relations.

QUESTION: 37

The policy of extending a country’s empire and influence

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

A person who hates women

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Government by a single person

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Destruction of unborn baby in mother’s womb

Solution:

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