English Full Test-4


40 Questions MCQ Test English for CLAT | English Full Test-4


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This mock test of English Full Test-4 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT English Full Test-4 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this English Full Test-4 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this English Full Test-4 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other English Full Test-4 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Directions (Q. 1 - 5): Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been given in bold to help locate them while answering some of the questions.

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) was created in the early 1990s as a component of the Uruguay Round negotiation. However, it could have been negotiated as part of the Tokyo Round of the 1970s, since that negotiation was an attempt at a ‘constitutional reform’ of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Or it could have been put off to the future, as the US government wanted. What factors led to the creation of the WTO in the early 1990s?

            One factor was the pattern of multilateral bargaining that developed late in the Uruguay Round. Like all complex international agreements, the WTO was a product of a series of trade-offs between the principal actors and groups for the United States, which did not want a new organisation, the dispute settlement part of the WTO package achieved its longstanding goal of a more effective and more legal dispute settlement system. For the Europeans, who by the 1990s had come to view GATT dispute settlement less in political terms and more as a regime of legal obligations, the WTO package was acceptable as a means to discipline the resort to unilateral measures by the United States. Countries like Canada and other middle and smaller trading partners were attracted by the expansion of a rules-based system and by the symbolic value of a trade organization, both of which inherently support the weak against the strong. The developing countries were attracted due to the provisions banning unilateral measures. Finally, and perhaps most important, many countries at the Uruguay Round came to put a higher priority on the export gains than on the import losses that the negotiation would produce, and they came to associate the WTO and a rules-based system with those gains. This reasoning – replicated in many countries – was contained in US Ambassador countries – was contained in us Ambassador Kantor’s defence of the WTO, and it amounted to a recognition that international trade and its benefits cannot be enjoyed unless trading nations accept the discipline of a negotiated rules-based environment.

            A second factor in the creation of the WTO was pressure from lawyers and the legal process. The dispute settlement system of the WTO was seen as a victory of legalists over pragmatists but the mater went deeper than that. The GATT and the WTO, are contract organisatons based on rules, and it is inevitable that an organisation created to further rules will in turn be influenced by the legal process. Robert Hundec has written of the ‘momentum of legal development’, but what is this precisely? Legal development can be defined as promotion of the technical legal values of consistency, clarity (or, certainty) and effectiveness; these are values that those responsible for administering any legal system will seek to maximise. As it played out in the WTO, consistency meant integrating under one roof, the whole lot of separate agreements signed under GATT auspices; clarity meant removing ambiguities about the power of contracting parties to make certain decisions or to undertake waivers; and effectiveness meant eliminating exceptions arising out of grandfather rights and resolving defects in dispute settlement procedures and institutional provisions. Concern for these values is inherent in any rules-based system of co-operation, since without these values, rules would be meaningless in the first place. Rules, therefore, create their own incentive for fulfillment.

            The momentum of legal development has occurred in other institutions besides the GATT, most notably in the European Union (EU). Over the past two decades, the European Court of Justice (ECI) has consistently rendered decisions that have expanded incrementally the EU’s internal market, in which the doctrine of ‘mutual recognition’ handed down in the case Cassis de Dijon in 1979 was a key turning point. The Court is now widely recognized as a major player in European integration, even though arguably, such a strong role was not originally envisaged in the Treaty of Rome, which initiated the current European Union. One means the court used to expand integration was the ‘teleological method of interpretation’, whereby the actions of member states were evaluated against ‘the accomplishment of the most elementary community goals set forth in the Preamble to the [Rome] treaty’. The teleological method represents an effort to keep current policies consistent with stated goals, and it is analogous to the effort in GATT to keep contracting party trade practices consistent with stated rules. In both cases, legal concerns and procedures are an independent force for further co-operation.

            In large part, the WTO was an exercise in consolidation. In the context of a trade negotiation that created a near-revolutionary expansion of international trade rules, the formation of the WTO was a deeply conservative act needed to ensure that the benefits of the new rules would not be lost. The WTO was all about institutional structures and dispute settlement; there are the concerns of conservatives and not revolutionaries, which is why lawyers and legalists took the lead on these issues. The WTO codified the GATT institutional practice that had developed by custom over three decades, and it incorporated a new dispute settlement system that was necessary to keep both old and new rules from becoming a sham. Both the international structure and the dispute settlement system were necessary to preserve and enhance the integrity of the multilateral trade regime that had been built incrementally from the 1940s to the 1990s.

Q.

What could be the closet reason why WTO was not formed in the 1970s?

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) was created in the early 1990s as a component of the Uruguay Round negotiation. However, it could have been negotiated as part of the Tokyo Round of the 1970s, since that negotiation was an attempt at a ‘constitutional reform’ of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Or it could have been put off to the future, as the US government wanted. What factors led to the creation of the WTO in the early 1990s?

            One factor was the pattern of multilateral bargaining that developed late in the Uruguay Round. Like all complex international agreements, the WTO was a product of a series of trade-offs between the principal actors and groups for the United States, which did not want a new organisation, the dispute settlement part of the WTO package achieved its longstanding goal of a more effective and more legal dispute settlement system. For the Europeans, who by the 1990s had come to view GATT dispute settlement less in political terms and more as a regime of legal obligations, the WTO package was acceptable as a means to discipline the resort to unilateral measures by the United States. Countries like Canada and other middle and smaller trading partners were attracted by the expansion of a rules-based system and by the symbolic value of a trade organization, both of which inherently support the weak against the strong. The developing countries were attracted due to the provisions banning unilateral measures. Finally, and perhaps most important, many countries at the Uruguay Round came to put a higher priority on the export gains than on the import losses that the negotiation would produce, and they came to associate the WTO and a rules-based system with those gains. This reasoning – replicated in many countries – was contained in US Ambassador countries – was contained in us Ambassador Kantor’s defence of the WTO, and it amounted to a recognition that international trade and its benefits cannot be enjoyed unless trading nations accept the discipline of a negotiated rules-based environment.

            A second factor in the creation of the WTO was pressure from lawyers and the legal process. The dispute settlement system of the WTO was seen as a victory of legalists over pragmatists but the mater went deeper than that. The GATT and the WTO, are contract organisatons based on rules, and it is inevitable that an organisation created to further rules will in turn be influenced by the legal process. Robert Hundec has written of the ‘momentum of legal development’, but what is this precisely? Legal development can be defined as promotion of the technical legal values of consistency, clarity (or, certainty) and effectiveness; these are values that those responsible for administering any legal system will seek to maximise. As it played out in the WTO, consistency meant integrating under one roof, the whole lot of separate agreements signed under GATT auspices; clarity meant removing ambiguities about the power of contracting parties to make certain decisions or to undertake waivers; and effectiveness meant eliminating exceptions arising out of grandfather rights and resolving defects in dispute settlement procedures and institutional provisions. Concern for these values is inherent in any rules-based system of co-operation, since without these values, rules would be meaningless in the first place. Rules, therefore, create their own incentive for fulfillment.

            The momentum of legal development has occurred in other institutions besides the GATT, most notably in the European Union (EU). Over the past two decades, the European Court of Justice (ECI) has consistently rendered decisions that have expanded incrementally the EU’s internal market, in which the doctrine of ‘mutual recognition’ handed down in the case Cassis de Dijon in 1979 was a key turning point. The Court is now widely recognized as a major player in European integration, even though arguably, such a strong role was not originally envisaged in the Treaty of Rome, which initiated the current European Union. One means the court used to expand integration was the ‘teleological method of interpretation’, whereby the actions of member states were evaluated against ‘the accomplishment of the most elementary community goals set forth in the Preamble to the [Rome] treaty’. The teleological method represents an effort to keep current policies consistent with stated goals, and it is analogous to the effort in GATT to keep contracting party trade practices consistent with stated rules. In both cases, legal concerns and procedures are an independent force for further co-operation.

            In large part, the WTO was an exercise in consolidation. In the context of a trade negotiation that created a near-revolutionary expansion of international trade rules, the formation of the WTO was a deeply conservative act needed to ensure that the benefits of the new rules would not be lost. The WTO was all about institutional structures and dispute settlement; there are the concerns of conservatives and not revolutionaries, which is why lawyers and legalists took the lead on these issues. The WTO codified the GATT institutional practice that had developed by custom over three decades, and it incorporated a new dispute settlement system that was necessary to keep both old and new rules from becoming a sham. Both the international structure and the dispute settlement system were necessary to preserve and enhance the integrity of the multilateral trade regime that had been built incrementally from the 1940s to the 1990s.

Q.

The most likely reason for the acceptance of the WTO package by nations was that

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) was created in the early 1990s as a component of the Uruguay Round negotiation. However, it could have been negotiated as part of the Tokyo Round of the 1970s, since that negotiation was an attempt at a ‘constitutional reform’ of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Or it could have been put off to the future, as the US government wanted. What factors led to the creation of the WTO in the early 1990s?

            One factor was the pattern of multilateral bargaining that developed late in the Uruguay Round. Like all complex international agreements, the WTO was a product of a series of trade-offs between the principal actors and groups for the United States, which did not want a new organisation, the dispute settlement part of the WTO package achieved its longstanding goal of a more effective and more legal dispute settlement system. For the Europeans, who by the 1990s had come to view GATT dispute settlement less in political terms and more as a regime of legal obligations, the WTO package was acceptable as a means to discipline the resort to unilateral measures by the United States. Countries like Canada and other middle and smaller trading partners were attracted by the expansion of a rules-based system and by the symbolic value of a trade organization, both of which inherently support the weak against the strong. The developing countries were attracted due to the provisions banning unilateral measures. Finally, and perhaps most important, many countries at the Uruguay Round came to put a higher priority on the export gains than on the import losses that the negotiation would produce, and they came to associate the WTO and a rules-based system with those gains. This reasoning – replicated in many countries – was contained in US Ambassador countries – was contained in us Ambassador Kantor’s defence of the WTO, and it amounted to a recognition that international trade and its benefits cannot be enjoyed unless trading nations accept the discipline of a negotiated rules-based environment.

            A second factor in the creation of the WTO was pressure from lawyers and the legal process. The dispute settlement system of the WTO was seen as a victory of legalists over pragmatists but the mater went deeper than that. The GATT and the WTO, are contract organisatons based on rules, and it is inevitable that an organisation created to further rules will in turn be influenced by the legal process. Robert Hundec has written of the ‘momentum of legal development’, but what is this precisely? Legal development can be defined as promotion of the technical legal values of consistency, clarity (or, certainty) and effectiveness; these are values that those responsible for administering any legal system will seek to maximise. As it played out in the WTO, consistency meant integrating under one roof, the whole lot of separate agreements signed under GATT auspices; clarity meant removing ambiguities about the power of contracting parties to make certain decisions or to undertake waivers; and effectiveness meant eliminating exceptions arising out of grandfather rights and resolving defects in dispute settlement procedures and institutional provisions. Concern for these values is inherent in any rules-based system of co-operation, since without these values, rules would be meaningless in the first place. Rules, therefore, create their own incentive for fulfillment.

            The momentum of legal development has occurred in other institutions besides the GATT, most notably in the European Union (EU). Over the past two decades, the European Court of Justice (ECI) has consistently rendered decisions that have expanded incrementally the EU’s internal market, in which the doctrine of ‘mutual recognition’ handed down in the case Cassis de Dijon in 1979 was a key turning point. The Court is now widely recognized as a major player in European integration, even though arguably, such a strong role was not originally envisaged in the Treaty of Rome, which initiated the current European Union. One means the court used to expand integration was the ‘teleological method of interpretation’, whereby the actions of member states were evaluated against ‘the accomplishment of the most elementary community goals set forth in the Preamble to the [Rome] treaty’. The teleological method represents an effort to keep current policies consistent with stated goals, and it is analogous to the effort in GATT to keep contracting party trade practices consistent with stated rules. In both cases, legal concerns and procedures are an independent force for further co-operation.

            In large part, the WTO was an exercise in consolidation. In the context of a trade negotiation that created a near-revolutionary expansion of international trade rules, the formation of the WTO was a deeply conservative act needed to ensure that the benefits of the new rules would not be lost. The WTO was all about institutional structures and dispute settlement; there are the concerns of conservatives and not revolutionaries, which is why lawyers and legalists took the lead on these issues. The WTO codified the GATT institutional practice that had developed by custom over three decades, and it incorporated a new dispute settlement system that was necessary to keep both old and new rules from becoming a sham. Both the international structure and the dispute settlement system were necessary to preserve and enhance the integrity of the multilateral trade regime that had been built incrementally from the 1940s to the 1990s.

Q.

According to the passage, WTO promoted the technical legal values partly through:

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) was created in the early 1990s as a component of the Uruguay Round negotiation. However, it could have been negotiated as part of the Tokyo Round of the 1970s, since that negotiation was an attempt at a ‘constitutional reform’ of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Or it could have been put off to the future, as the US government wanted. What factors led to the creation of the WTO in the early 1990s?

            One factor was the pattern of multilateral bargaining that developed late in the Uruguay Round. Like all complex international agreements, the WTO was a product of a series of trade-offs between the principal actors and groups for the United States, which did not want a new organisation, the dispute settlement part of the WTO package achieved its longstanding goal of a more effective and more legal dispute settlement system. For the Europeans, who by the 1990s had come to view GATT dispute settlement less in political terms and more as a regime of legal obligations, the WTO package was acceptable as a means to discipline the resort to unilateral measures by the United States. Countries like Canada and other middle and smaller trading partners were attracted by the expansion of a rules-based system and by the symbolic value of a trade organization, both of which inherently support the weak against the strong. The developing countries were attracted due to the provisions banning unilateral measures. Finally, and perhaps most important, many countries at the Uruguay Round came to put a higher priority on the export gains than on the import losses that the negotiation would produce, and they came to associate the WTO and a rules-based system with those gains. This reasoning – replicated in many countries – was contained in US Ambassador countries – was contained in us Ambassador Kantor’s defence of the WTO, and it amounted to a recognition that international trade and its benefits cannot be enjoyed unless trading nations accept the discipline of a negotiated rules-based environment.

            A second factor in the creation of the WTO was pressure from lawyers and the legal process. The dispute settlement system of the WTO was seen as a victory of legalists over pragmatists but the mater went deeper than that. The GATT and the WTO, are contract organisatons based on rules, and it is inevitable that an organisation created to further rules will in turn be influenced by the legal process. Robert Hundec has written of the ‘momentum of legal development’, but what is this precisely? Legal development can be defined as promotion of the technical legal values of consistency, clarity (or, certainty) and effectiveness; these are values that those responsible for administering any legal system will seek to maximise. As it played out in the WTO, consistency meant integrating under one roof, the whole lot of separate agreements signed under GATT auspices; clarity meant removing ambiguities about the power of contracting parties to make certain decisions or to undertake waivers; and effectiveness meant eliminating exceptions arising out of grandfather rights and resolving defects in dispute settlement procedures and institutional provisions. Concern for these values is inherent in any rules-based system of co-operation, since without these values, rules would be meaningless in the first place. Rules, therefore, create their own incentive for fulfillment.

            The momentum of legal development has occurred in other institutions besides the GATT, most notably in the European Union (EU). Over the past two decades, the European Court of Justice (ECI) has consistently rendered decisions that have expanded incrementally the EU’s internal market, in which the doctrine of ‘mutual recognition’ handed down in the case Cassis de Dijon in 1979 was a key turning point. The Court is now widely recognized as a major player in European integration, even though arguably, such a strong role was not originally envisaged in the Treaty of Rome, which initiated the current European Union. One means the court used to expand integration was the ‘teleological method of interpretation’, whereby the actions of member states were evaluated against ‘the accomplishment of the most elementary community goals set forth in the Preamble to the [Rome] treaty’. The teleological method represents an effort to keep current policies consistent with stated goals, and it is analogous to the effort in GATT to keep contracting party trade practices consistent with stated rules. In both cases, legal concerns and procedures are an independent force for further co-operation.

            In large part, the WTO was an exercise in consolidation. In the context of a trade negotiation that created a near-revolutionary expansion of international trade rules, the formation of the WTO was a deeply conservative act needed to ensure that the benefits of the new rules would not be lost. The WTO was all about institutional structures and dispute settlement; there are the concerns of conservatives and not revolutionaries, which is why lawyers and legalists took the lead on these issues. The WTO codified the GATT institutional practice that had developed by custom over three decades, and it incorporated a new dispute settlement system that was necessary to keep both old and new rules from becoming a sham. Both the international structure and the dispute settlement system were necessary to preserve and enhance the integrity of the multilateral trade regime that had been built incrementally from the 1940s to the 1990s.

Q.

In the method of interpretation of the European Court of Justice.

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) was created in the early 1990s as a component of the Uruguay Round negotiation. However, it could have been negotiated as part of the Tokyo Round of the 1970s, since that negotiation was an attempt at a ‘constitutional reform’ of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Or it could have been put off to the future, as the US government wanted. What factors led to the creation of the WTO in the early 1990s?

            One factor was the pattern of multilateral bargaining that developed late in the Uruguay Round. Like all complex international agreements, the WTO was a product of a series of trade-offs between the principal actors and groups for the United States, which did not want a new organisation, the dispute settlement part of the WTO package achieved its longstanding goal of a more effective and more legal dispute settlement system. For the Europeans, who by the 1990s had come to view GATT dispute settlement less in political terms and more as a regime of legal obligations, the WTO package was acceptable as a means to discipline the resort to unilateral measures by the United States. Countries like Canada and other middle and smaller trading partners were attracted by the expansion of a rules-based system and by the symbolic value of a trade organization, both of which inherently support the weak against the strong. The developing countries were attracted due to the provisions banning unilateral measures. Finally, and perhaps most important, many countries at the Uruguay Round came to put a higher priority on the export gains than on the import losses that the negotiation would produce, and they came to associate the WTO and a rules-based system with those gains. This reasoning – replicated in many countries – was contained in US Ambassador countries – was contained in us Ambassador Kantor’s defence of the WTO, and it amounted to a recognition that international trade and its benefits cannot be enjoyed unless trading nations accept the discipline of a negotiated rules-based environment.

            A second factor in the creation of the WTO was pressure from lawyers and the legal process. The dispute settlement system of the WTO was seen as a victory of legalists over pragmatists but the mater went deeper than that. The GATT and the WTO, are contract organisatons based on rules, and it is inevitable that an organisation created to further rules will in turn be influenced by the legal process. Robert Hundec has written of the ‘momentum of legal development’, but what is this precisely? Legal development can be defined as promotion of the technical legal values of consistency, clarity (or, certainty) and effectiveness; these are values that those responsible for administering any legal system will seek to maximise. As it played out in the WTO, consistency meant integrating under one roof, the whole lot of separate agreements signed under GATT auspices; clarity meant removing ambiguities about the power of contracting parties to make certain decisions or to undertake waivers; and effectiveness meant eliminating exceptions arising out of grandfather rights and resolving defects in dispute settlement procedures and institutional provisions. Concern for these values is inherent in any rules-based system of co-operation, since without these values, rules would be meaningless in the first place. Rules, therefore, create their own incentive for fulfillment.

            The momentum of legal development has occurred in other institutions besides the GATT, most notably in the European Union (EU). Over the past two decades, the European Court of Justice (ECI) has consistently rendered decisions that have expanded incrementally the EU’s internal market, in which the doctrine of ‘mutual recognition’ handed down in the case Cassis de Dijon in 1979 was a key turning point. The Court is now widely recognized as a major player in European integration, even though arguably, such a strong role was not originally envisaged in the Treaty of Rome, which initiated the current European Union. One means the court used to expand integration was the ‘teleological method of interpretation’, whereby the actions of member states were evaluated against ‘the accomplishment of the most elementary community goals set forth in the Preamble to the [Rome] treaty’. The teleological method represents an effort to keep current policies consistent with stated goals, and it is analogous to the effort in GATT to keep contracting party trade practices consistent with stated rules. In both cases, legal concerns and procedures are an independent force for further co-operation.

            In large part, the WTO was an exercise in consolidation. In the context of a trade negotiation that created a near-revolutionary expansion of international trade rules, the formation of the WTO was a deeply conservative act needed to ensure that the benefits of the new rules would not be lost. The WTO was all about institutional structures and dispute settlement; there are the concerns of conservatives and not revolutionaries, which is why lawyers and legalists took the lead on these issues. The WTO codified the GATT institutional practice that had developed by custom over three decades, and it incorporated a new dispute settlement system that was necessary to keep both old and new rules from becoming a sham. Both the international structure and the dispute settlement system were necessary to preserve and enhance the integrity of the multilateral trade regime that had been built incrementally from the 1940s to the 1990s.

Q.

In the statement “…….. It amounted to recognition that international trade and its benefits cannot be enjoyed unless trading nations accept the discipline of a negotiated rules-based on environment”, ‘it’ refers to:

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions (Q. 6 - 15): In the following passage, some of the words have been left out, each of which is indicated by a number. Find the suitable word from the options given against each number and fill up the blanks with appropriate words to make the paragraph meaningful.

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 6

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 7

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 8

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 9

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 10

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 11

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 12

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 13

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 14

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

India is (6)             the move and the old order passes. Too long have we been (7)          spectators of events and the (8)          of others. The (9)          Comes to our people now and we shall make the history of our (10)                  let us all join in this mighty (11)              and make India, the (12)            Of our heart, great among nations, foremost in the arts of peace and progress. The door is open and destiny (13)         to all. There is no question of who wins and who (14)         for we have to go forward and together as comrades and either all of us win or we all (15)         together.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 15

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Directions (Q. 16 - 20): Each question below has two blanks, each blank indicating than something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.

Q. Banking ……….the…….. of a new powerful body of opinion which could not be ignored by the great writers.

Solution:

D is the correct option. Induced means persuading  or give rise to something and here the banking has “induced” the “debut” ,meaning perform in public for the first time,a new powerful body of opinion.

QUESTION: 17

It is ……. that those who expect …….. from others are seldom merciful themselves.

Solution:

D is the correct option.The sentence is talking about the absurdity of people who expect for mercy. Paradoxical means seemingly absurd or self-contradictory and clemency means mercy.

QUESTION: 18

He was ….. of playing ……. and loose with the sentiments of his dearest friends.

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

The new Principal ……. Stress on routine administration ……….. than on academic matters and examination reforms.

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

Nothing is so ……….. to a nation as an extreme of self partially, and the total want of ………… of what others will naturally hope or fear.

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Directions (Q. 21 - 25): In the following sentence, a word or phrase is written in underline letter. For each underline part four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the underline part.

Q. One’s remonstration against social ills has to be consistent to be fruitful.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

It would be impertinent to suggest that he was generally wrong.

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

The opposition criticized the ruling party for the deteriorating law and order situation in the state.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

One of the salient features of your proposal is a stress on self employment.

Solution:

The correct option is A.
Salient and prominent both means important or noticeable.

QUESTION: 25

Man has to encounter many hardships in life.

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Directions (Q. 26 - 30): Fill in the Blanks

The problems suggested by style as a sign and index of personality may be …….. from many points of view.

Solution:

Approached is the best word suited in the sentence to complete its meaning and it means to come near/nearer to something. 

QUESTION: 27

The explorers’ path was ………. with dangers.

Solution:

A is the correct option. The explorer's path was beset with dangers. Beset means trouble.

QUESTION: 28

Once you suspect a person of double dealing, you ought to keep him at arm’s ………

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

The rioters were creating ………… on the street.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

I am given to ……… that you are going abroad.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
Sentence is written with modal. 
Subject + modal + second verb

QUESTION: 31

Directions (Q. 31 - 35): In each of the following sentences, four options are given. You are, required to identity the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.

Q.

If we cooperate together by dividing up the booty, we shall be able to work together smoothly in the future.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
It is the correct formation of the sentence.

QUESTION: 32

The entire cast and crew of the film, enjoyed splashing in the pool, bathing in the ocean, and, particularly, to sun bathe on the shore.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
 Parallel structure requires the use of the verbal noun as the object of the verb enjoyed: Enjoyed what? splashing, bathing; and sun bathing, Enjoy should not be followed by an infinitive construction.

QUESTION: 33

Crossing the street, a bus almost crushed as to death.

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

The moral of the entire story is how money does not make you happy.

Solution:
QUESTION: 35

Entertainment being recognized as an important factor in improving mental and physical health and thereby reducing human misery and proverty.

Solution:
QUESTION: 36

Directions (36-40): In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.

Q.

Elimination of racial group by killing

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

A process involving too much official formality

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Habit of secretly listening to private conversation

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Person who brings an action at law

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

A large scale departure of people from a territory

Solution:

The correct option is A.

A large-scale departure of people from a territory is exodus.

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