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NCERT Textbook: Chapter 3 - Taro's Reward, English, Class 6 | English Class 6 (Honeysuckle) PDF Download

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TARO’S REWARD 27
1. A YOUNG woodcutter named Taro lived
with his mother and father on a lonely
hillside. All day long he chopped wood
in the forest. Though he worked very
hard, he earned very little money. This
3
Before you read
This is a story about a thoughtful and loving son.
He works hard to fulfil his parents’ wishes and
gets some unexpected help.
Taro’s Reward
Taro’s Reward
chopped: cut
into pieces
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 2


TARO’S REWARD 27
1. A YOUNG woodcutter named Taro lived
with his mother and father on a lonely
hillside. All day long he chopped wood
in the forest. Though he worked very
hard, he earned very little money. This
3
Before you read
This is a story about a thoughtful and loving son.
He works hard to fulfil his parents’ wishes and
gets some unexpected help.
Taro’s Reward
Taro’s Reward
chopped: cut
into pieces
Rationalised 2023-24
28 HONEYSUCKLE
made him sad, for he was a thoughtful
son and wanted to give his old parents
everything they needed.
2. One evening, when Taro and his
parents were sitting in a corner of their
hut, a strong wind began to blow. It
whistled through the cracks of the hut
and everyone felt very cold. Suddenly
Taro’s father said, “I wish I had a cup of
saké; it would warm me and do my old
heart good.”
3. This made Taro sadder than ever,
for the heart-warming drink called
saké was very expensive. ‘How do I
earn more money?’ he asked himself.
‘How do I get a little saké for my poor
old father?’ He decided to work harder
than before.
4. Next morning, Taro jumped out of
bed earlier than usual and made his
way to the forest. He chopped and cut,
chopped and cut as the sun climbed,
and soon he was so warm that he had
to take off his jacket. His mouth was
dry, and his face was wet with sweat.
‘My poor old father!’ he thought. ‘If only
he was as warm as I!’
And with that he began to chop even
faster, thinking of the extra money he
must earn to buy the saké to warm the
old  man’s bones.
5. Then suddenly Taro stopped
chopping. What was that sound he
whistled through:
passed through
with a whistling
sound
cracks: narrow
gaps/openings
saké : a popular
Japanese drink
(‘sa’ is pronounced
like ‘fa’ in ‘father’
and ‘ke’ rhymes
with ‘way’)
expensive: costly
made his way to:
went to
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 3


TARO’S REWARD 27
1. A YOUNG woodcutter named Taro lived
with his mother and father on a lonely
hillside. All day long he chopped wood
in the forest. Though he worked very
hard, he earned very little money. This
3
Before you read
This is a story about a thoughtful and loving son.
He works hard to fulfil his parents’ wishes and
gets some unexpected help.
Taro’s Reward
Taro’s Reward
chopped: cut
into pieces
Rationalised 2023-24
28 HONEYSUCKLE
made him sad, for he was a thoughtful
son and wanted to give his old parents
everything they needed.
2. One evening, when Taro and his
parents were sitting in a corner of their
hut, a strong wind began to blow. It
whistled through the cracks of the hut
and everyone felt very cold. Suddenly
Taro’s father said, “I wish I had a cup of
saké; it would warm me and do my old
heart good.”
3. This made Taro sadder than ever,
for the heart-warming drink called
saké was very expensive. ‘How do I
earn more money?’ he asked himself.
‘How do I get a little saké for my poor
old father?’ He decided to work harder
than before.
4. Next morning, Taro jumped out of
bed earlier than usual and made his
way to the forest. He chopped and cut,
chopped and cut as the sun climbed,
and soon he was so warm that he had
to take off his jacket. His mouth was
dry, and his face was wet with sweat.
‘My poor old father!’ he thought. ‘If only
he was as warm as I!’
And with that he began to chop even
faster, thinking of the extra money he
must earn to buy the saké to warm the
old  man’s bones.
5. Then suddenly Taro stopped
chopping. What was that sound he
whistled through:
passed through
with a whistling
sound
cracks: narrow
gaps/openings
saké : a popular
Japanese drink
(‘sa’ is pronounced
like ‘fa’ in ‘father’
and ‘ke’ rhymes
with ‘way’)
expensive: costly
made his way to:
went to
Rationalised 2023-24
TARO’S REWARD 29
heard? Could it be, could it possibly be
rushing water?
Taro could not remember ever seeing
or hearing a rushing stream in that part
of the forest. He was thirsty. The axe
dropped out of his hands and he ran in
the direction of the sound.
6. Taro saw a beautiful little waterfall
hidden behind a rock. Kneeling at a
place where the water flowed quietly,
he cupped a little in his hands and
put it to his lips. Was it water? Or was
it saké? He tasted it again and again,
and always it was the delicious saké
instead of cold water.
7. Taro quickly filled the pitcher he had
with him and hurried home. The old
man was delighted with the saké. After
cupped a little in
his hands: took
some water in
his hands (as if
in a cup)
delicious: very
tasty
pitcher: a pot
usually made of
mud
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 4


TARO’S REWARD 27
1. A YOUNG woodcutter named Taro lived
with his mother and father on a lonely
hillside. All day long he chopped wood
in the forest. Though he worked very
hard, he earned very little money. This
3
Before you read
This is a story about a thoughtful and loving son.
He works hard to fulfil his parents’ wishes and
gets some unexpected help.
Taro’s Reward
Taro’s Reward
chopped: cut
into pieces
Rationalised 2023-24
28 HONEYSUCKLE
made him sad, for he was a thoughtful
son and wanted to give his old parents
everything they needed.
2. One evening, when Taro and his
parents were sitting in a corner of their
hut, a strong wind began to blow. It
whistled through the cracks of the hut
and everyone felt very cold. Suddenly
Taro’s father said, “I wish I had a cup of
saké; it would warm me and do my old
heart good.”
3. This made Taro sadder than ever,
for the heart-warming drink called
saké was very expensive. ‘How do I
earn more money?’ he asked himself.
‘How do I get a little saké for my poor
old father?’ He decided to work harder
than before.
4. Next morning, Taro jumped out of
bed earlier than usual and made his
way to the forest. He chopped and cut,
chopped and cut as the sun climbed,
and soon he was so warm that he had
to take off his jacket. His mouth was
dry, and his face was wet with sweat.
‘My poor old father!’ he thought. ‘If only
he was as warm as I!’
And with that he began to chop even
faster, thinking of the extra money he
must earn to buy the saké to warm the
old  man’s bones.
5. Then suddenly Taro stopped
chopping. What was that sound he
whistled through:
passed through
with a whistling
sound
cracks: narrow
gaps/openings
saké : a popular
Japanese drink
(‘sa’ is pronounced
like ‘fa’ in ‘father’
and ‘ke’ rhymes
with ‘way’)
expensive: costly
made his way to:
went to
Rationalised 2023-24
TARO’S REWARD 29
heard? Could it be, could it possibly be
rushing water?
Taro could not remember ever seeing
or hearing a rushing stream in that part
of the forest. He was thirsty. The axe
dropped out of his hands and he ran in
the direction of the sound.
6. Taro saw a beautiful little waterfall
hidden behind a rock. Kneeling at a
place where the water flowed quietly,
he cupped a little in his hands and
put it to his lips. Was it water? Or was
it saké? He tasted it again and again,
and always it was the delicious saké
instead of cold water.
7. Taro quickly filled the pitcher he had
with him and hurried home. The old
man was delighted with the saké. After
cupped a little in
his hands: took
some water in
his hands (as if
in a cup)
delicious: very
tasty
pitcher: a pot
usually made of
mud
Rationalised 2023-24
30 HONEYSUCKLE
only one swallow of the liquid he stopped
shivering and did a little dance in the
middle of the floor.
8. That afternoon, a neighbour stopped
by for a visit. Taro’s father politely offered
her a cup of the saké. The lady drank it
greedily, and thanked the old man. Then
Taro told her the story of the magic
waterfall. Thanking them for the
delicious drink, she left in a hurry. By
nightfall she had spread the story
throughout the whole village.
9. That evening there was a long
procession of visitors to the woodcutter’s
house. Each man heard the story of
the waterfall, and took a sip of the
saké. In less than an hour the pitcher
was empty.
10. Next morning, Taro started for work
even earlier than the morning before.
He carried with him the largest pitcher
he owned, for he intended first of all to
go to the waterfall. When he reached
it, he found to his great surprise all his
neighbours there. They were carrying
pitchers, jars, buckets — anything they
could find to hold the magic saké. Then
one villager knelt and held his mouth
under the waterfall to drink. He drank
again and again, and then shouted
angrily, “Water! Nothing but water!”
Others also tried, but there was no
saké, only cold water.
greedily: as if
desiring more
and more
intended: planned
Rationalised 2023-24
Page 5


TARO’S REWARD 27
1. A YOUNG woodcutter named Taro lived
with his mother and father on a lonely
hillside. All day long he chopped wood
in the forest. Though he worked very
hard, he earned very little money. This
3
Before you read
This is a story about a thoughtful and loving son.
He works hard to fulfil his parents’ wishes and
gets some unexpected help.
Taro’s Reward
Taro’s Reward
chopped: cut
into pieces
Rationalised 2023-24
28 HONEYSUCKLE
made him sad, for he was a thoughtful
son and wanted to give his old parents
everything they needed.
2. One evening, when Taro and his
parents were sitting in a corner of their
hut, a strong wind began to blow. It
whistled through the cracks of the hut
and everyone felt very cold. Suddenly
Taro’s father said, “I wish I had a cup of
saké; it would warm me and do my old
heart good.”
3. This made Taro sadder than ever,
for the heart-warming drink called
saké was very expensive. ‘How do I
earn more money?’ he asked himself.
‘How do I get a little saké for my poor
old father?’ He decided to work harder
than before.
4. Next morning, Taro jumped out of
bed earlier than usual and made his
way to the forest. He chopped and cut,
chopped and cut as the sun climbed,
and soon he was so warm that he had
to take off his jacket. His mouth was
dry, and his face was wet with sweat.
‘My poor old father!’ he thought. ‘If only
he was as warm as I!’
And with that he began to chop even
faster, thinking of the extra money he
must earn to buy the saké to warm the
old  man’s bones.
5. Then suddenly Taro stopped
chopping. What was that sound he
whistled through:
passed through
with a whistling
sound
cracks: narrow
gaps/openings
saké : a popular
Japanese drink
(‘sa’ is pronounced
like ‘fa’ in ‘father’
and ‘ke’ rhymes
with ‘way’)
expensive: costly
made his way to:
went to
Rationalised 2023-24
TARO’S REWARD 29
heard? Could it be, could it possibly be
rushing water?
Taro could not remember ever seeing
or hearing a rushing stream in that part
of the forest. He was thirsty. The axe
dropped out of his hands and he ran in
the direction of the sound.
6. Taro saw a beautiful little waterfall
hidden behind a rock. Kneeling at a
place where the water flowed quietly,
he cupped a little in his hands and
put it to his lips. Was it water? Or was
it saké? He tasted it again and again,
and always it was the delicious saké
instead of cold water.
7. Taro quickly filled the pitcher he had
with him and hurried home. The old
man was delighted with the saké. After
cupped a little in
his hands: took
some water in
his hands (as if
in a cup)
delicious: very
tasty
pitcher: a pot
usually made of
mud
Rationalised 2023-24
30 HONEYSUCKLE
only one swallow of the liquid he stopped
shivering and did a little dance in the
middle of the floor.
8. That afternoon, a neighbour stopped
by for a visit. Taro’s father politely offered
her a cup of the saké. The lady drank it
greedily, and thanked the old man. Then
Taro told her the story of the magic
waterfall. Thanking them for the
delicious drink, she left in a hurry. By
nightfall she had spread the story
throughout the whole village.
9. That evening there was a long
procession of visitors to the woodcutter’s
house. Each man heard the story of
the waterfall, and took a sip of the
saké. In less than an hour the pitcher
was empty.
10. Next morning, Taro started for work
even earlier than the morning before.
He carried with him the largest pitcher
he owned, for he intended first of all to
go to the waterfall. When he reached
it, he found to his great surprise all his
neighbours there. They were carrying
pitchers, jars, buckets — anything they
could find to hold the magic saké. Then
one villager knelt and held his mouth
under the waterfall to drink. He drank
again and again, and then shouted
angrily, “Water! Nothing but water!”
Others also tried, but there was no
saké, only cold water.
greedily: as if
desiring more
and more
intended: planned
Rationalised 2023-24
TARO’S REWARD 31
11. “We have been tricked!” shouted the
villagers. “Where is Taro? Let us drown
him in this waterfall.” But Taro had been
wise enough to slip behind a rock when
he saw how things were going. He was
nowhere to be found.
12. Muttering their anger and
disappointment, the villagers left the
place one by one. Taro came out from
his hiding place. Was it true, he
wondered? Was the saké a dream?
Once more he caught a little liquid in
his hand and put it to his lips. It was
the same fine saké. To the thoughtful
son, the magic waterfall gave the
delicious saké. To everyone else, it gave
only cold water.
tricked: deceived
muttering: speaking
unclearly
Rationalised 2023-24
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FAQs on NCERT Textbook: Chapter 3 - Taro's Reward, English, Class 6 - English Class 6 (Honeysuckle)

1. What is the story of "Taro's Reward" about?
Ans. "Taro's Reward" is a story about a poor farmer named Taro who finds a jar full of gold coins while he is digging in his field. The story revolves around Taro's decision to keep the gold or return it to its rightful owner.
2. Who is the author of the story "Taro's Reward"?
Ans. The story "Taro's Reward" is an old Japanese folktale. It is a traditional story that has been passed down through generations, and the author is unknown.
3. What lesson can be learned from the story "Taro's Reward"?
Ans. The story teaches the importance of honesty and integrity. Taro chooses to return the gold coins despite his poverty, showing that doing the right thing is more rewarding than personal gain.
4. How does the story "Taro's Reward" relate to the theme of kindness?
Ans. The story highlights the theme of kindness through Taro's selfless act of returning the gold coins. His decision to help others, even when he is in need, demonstrates the power of kindness and empathy.
5. Are there any other similar stories like "Taro's Reward" in Japanese folklore?
Ans. Yes, Japanese folklore is rich with similar stories that emphasize moral values. One such story is "The Crane Wife," which teaches the importance of trust and gratitude. Another is "Momotaro," a tale about a boy born from a peach who goes on a quest to defeat evil and bring prosperity to his village.
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