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ALL INDIA LAW ENTRANCE TEST (AILET) 2010 Question Paper 
Time: 1 hour 30 minutes                                                                             Total Marks: 150 
SECTION A : ENGLISH 
Read the passage and answer the questions following it: 
Artists should treat their art as art and take the process of making it as seriously as anyone takes their 
chosen profession. Great skill and insight are required in order to create truly original art. Transforming 
an idea or concept into a technically thought-provoking or emotion-arousing work of art in any medium 
is a talent that few people possess. And there you have the “purist’s vision.” 
Now if an artist wants to create art and never sell it, then he or she never has to worry about how to 
price it. That artist can afford to be a “purist,” as you put it, produce art free of any encumbrances or 
concerns about what the art world or any one else might think, and avoid “prostituting” or “debasing” 
that art by placing dollar values on it. But if you’re an artist who wants to sell your art or who has to sell 
it in order to survive as an artist, you must use whatever tools are available to figure out how much it’s 
worth and how best to sell it. 
Let’s say you’re just starting out as an artist, you have little or no experience showing or selling your 
work, and in a period of two minutes, you produce a pencil drawing on a piece of paper. You view this 
drawing as highly significant in your evolution as an artist and rank its creation as the single most 
important creative moment of your life. Consequently, you put a price of $20,000 on it because only for 
that amount of money will you agree to part with such an important work of art. This is a “purist’s 
vision” approach to pricing as opposed to a “realities of the marketplace” approach. 
From a business standpoint, you’ll have an extremely difficult time selling your drawing, as you won’t be 
able to justify the $20,000 price to real art buyers in the real art world. You have no track record of 
selling art in that price range, and you have few or no shows, critical reviews, or supporting data from 
outside sources indicating that your art has that kind of value or collectability in the marketplace. The 
overwhelming majority of art buyers who have $20,000 to spend look for works of art by established 
artists with documented track records of showing and selling art in that price range. 
Your drawing is still highly significant to you, but what someone is willing to pay for it on the open 
market is a matter for art buyers to decide. You can price it however you wish, but you can never force 
anyone to buy it. That’s the way the art business works. So if you want to sell it, you have to figure out 
what dollar amount someone is likely to pay for it on the open market and then price it at that amount. 
But the tale of your drawing does not end here. 
The art world may, one agree with you that the product of your two-minute moment precipitates a 
major transformational turning point in your career, and is well worth a $20,000 asking price, but you’re 
going to have to prove first. Aspects of that drawing will have to be reflected in your art from the 
moment you created it onwards, the art world will have to recognize your art both critically and from 
Page 2


 
 
ALL INDIA LAW ENTRANCE TEST (AILET) 2010 Question Paper 
Time: 1 hour 30 minutes                                                                             Total Marks: 150 
SECTION A : ENGLISH 
Read the passage and answer the questions following it: 
Artists should treat their art as art and take the process of making it as seriously as anyone takes their 
chosen profession. Great skill and insight are required in order to create truly original art. Transforming 
an idea or concept into a technically thought-provoking or emotion-arousing work of art in any medium 
is a talent that few people possess. And there you have the “purist’s vision.” 
Now if an artist wants to create art and never sell it, then he or she never has to worry about how to 
price it. That artist can afford to be a “purist,” as you put it, produce art free of any encumbrances or 
concerns about what the art world or any one else might think, and avoid “prostituting” or “debasing” 
that art by placing dollar values on it. But if you’re an artist who wants to sell your art or who has to sell 
it in order to survive as an artist, you must use whatever tools are available to figure out how much it’s 
worth and how best to sell it. 
Let’s say you’re just starting out as an artist, you have little or no experience showing or selling your 
work, and in a period of two minutes, you produce a pencil drawing on a piece of paper. You view this 
drawing as highly significant in your evolution as an artist and rank its creation as the single most 
important creative moment of your life. Consequently, you put a price of $20,000 on it because only for 
that amount of money will you agree to part with such an important work of art. This is a “purist’s 
vision” approach to pricing as opposed to a “realities of the marketplace” approach. 
From a business standpoint, you’ll have an extremely difficult time selling your drawing, as you won’t be 
able to justify the $20,000 price to real art buyers in the real art world. You have no track record of 
selling art in that price range, and you have few or no shows, critical reviews, or supporting data from 
outside sources indicating that your art has that kind of value or collectability in the marketplace. The 
overwhelming majority of art buyers who have $20,000 to spend look for works of art by established 
artists with documented track records of showing and selling art in that price range. 
Your drawing is still highly significant to you, but what someone is willing to pay for it on the open 
market is a matter for art buyers to decide. You can price it however you wish, but you can never force 
anyone to buy it. That’s the way the art business works. So if you want to sell it, you have to figure out 
what dollar amount someone is likely to pay for it on the open market and then price it at that amount. 
But the tale of your drawing does not end here. 
The art world may, one agree with you that the product of your two-minute moment precipitates a 
major transformational turning point in your career, and is well worth a $20,000 asking price, but you’re 
going to have to prove first. Aspects of that drawing will have to be reflected in your art from the 
moment you created it onwards, the art world will have to recognize your art both critically and from 
 
 
the marketing standpoints, and you’ll have to successfully produce, show, and sell for many years. Then 
one day, when your first retrospective exhibition opens at the Four-Star Museum of Art, that drawing 
will hang framed and captioned as the first inspiration for all subsequent work. The art world will then 
understand and respect its significance, and a serious collector may well be willing to pay an 
extraordinary price to own this historically important document of your career. 
Returning for a moment to the concept of a purist artist who creates art and never sells it, 
sooner or later (hopefully later), that purist will pass on and leave behind a body of work. Unless that 
artist leaves specific instructions in his or her Will for that body of work to be destroyed, it will become 
subject to those market forces that the artist strived for a life-time to avoid. At the very least, it’ll have 
to be appraised for tax, donation, or inheritance purposes. In most cases, it eventually comes onto the 
market either through a probable sale, an auction, or as represented by a dealer, gallery, or family 
member. 
The moral of the story is that one way or another, someone somewhere at some point in time will use 
tried and true methods to realistically price and either sell, donate, trade or otherwise transact any work 
of art that comes onto the market in any way, shape, or form. I hope that that person will be you, the 
artist, and that you’ll price your art according to what the market will bear, sell plenty of it, and have a 
long and rewarding career. 
Answer the following questions indicating your option for each question: 
1. The purist’s art is 
(a) one that arouses emotions 
(b) thought-provoking 
(c) technically sound 
(d) free from any encumbrances or concerns about what the world or anyone else might think of it 
2. The “realities of the marketplace” approach entails 
(a) “prostituting” one’s art by putting a dollar price on it 
(b) gauging the market value of one’s art and then putting a price on it 
(c) compromising on one’s estimation of one’s own art as far as its worth in financial terms is 
concerned 
(d) subjecting one’s art to the buyer’s interpretation of it 
(a) Only (a) 
(b) Only (b) and (d) 
Page 3


 
 
ALL INDIA LAW ENTRANCE TEST (AILET) 2010 Question Paper 
Time: 1 hour 30 minutes                                                                             Total Marks: 150 
SECTION A : ENGLISH 
Read the passage and answer the questions following it: 
Artists should treat their art as art and take the process of making it as seriously as anyone takes their 
chosen profession. Great skill and insight are required in order to create truly original art. Transforming 
an idea or concept into a technically thought-provoking or emotion-arousing work of art in any medium 
is a talent that few people possess. And there you have the “purist’s vision.” 
Now if an artist wants to create art and never sell it, then he or she never has to worry about how to 
price it. That artist can afford to be a “purist,” as you put it, produce art free of any encumbrances or 
concerns about what the art world or any one else might think, and avoid “prostituting” or “debasing” 
that art by placing dollar values on it. But if you’re an artist who wants to sell your art or who has to sell 
it in order to survive as an artist, you must use whatever tools are available to figure out how much it’s 
worth and how best to sell it. 
Let’s say you’re just starting out as an artist, you have little or no experience showing or selling your 
work, and in a period of two minutes, you produce a pencil drawing on a piece of paper. You view this 
drawing as highly significant in your evolution as an artist and rank its creation as the single most 
important creative moment of your life. Consequently, you put a price of $20,000 on it because only for 
that amount of money will you agree to part with such an important work of art. This is a “purist’s 
vision” approach to pricing as opposed to a “realities of the marketplace” approach. 
From a business standpoint, you’ll have an extremely difficult time selling your drawing, as you won’t be 
able to justify the $20,000 price to real art buyers in the real art world. You have no track record of 
selling art in that price range, and you have few or no shows, critical reviews, or supporting data from 
outside sources indicating that your art has that kind of value or collectability in the marketplace. The 
overwhelming majority of art buyers who have $20,000 to spend look for works of art by established 
artists with documented track records of showing and selling art in that price range. 
Your drawing is still highly significant to you, but what someone is willing to pay for it on the open 
market is a matter for art buyers to decide. You can price it however you wish, but you can never force 
anyone to buy it. That’s the way the art business works. So if you want to sell it, you have to figure out 
what dollar amount someone is likely to pay for it on the open market and then price it at that amount. 
But the tale of your drawing does not end here. 
The art world may, one agree with you that the product of your two-minute moment precipitates a 
major transformational turning point in your career, and is well worth a $20,000 asking price, but you’re 
going to have to prove first. Aspects of that drawing will have to be reflected in your art from the 
moment you created it onwards, the art world will have to recognize your art both critically and from 
 
 
the marketing standpoints, and you’ll have to successfully produce, show, and sell for many years. Then 
one day, when your first retrospective exhibition opens at the Four-Star Museum of Art, that drawing 
will hang framed and captioned as the first inspiration for all subsequent work. The art world will then 
understand and respect its significance, and a serious collector may well be willing to pay an 
extraordinary price to own this historically important document of your career. 
Returning for a moment to the concept of a purist artist who creates art and never sells it, 
sooner or later (hopefully later), that purist will pass on and leave behind a body of work. Unless that 
artist leaves specific instructions in his or her Will for that body of work to be destroyed, it will become 
subject to those market forces that the artist strived for a life-time to avoid. At the very least, it’ll have 
to be appraised for tax, donation, or inheritance purposes. In most cases, it eventually comes onto the 
market either through a probable sale, an auction, or as represented by a dealer, gallery, or family 
member. 
The moral of the story is that one way or another, someone somewhere at some point in time will use 
tried and true methods to realistically price and either sell, donate, trade or otherwise transact any work 
of art that comes onto the market in any way, shape, or form. I hope that that person will be you, the 
artist, and that you’ll price your art according to what the market will bear, sell plenty of it, and have a 
long and rewarding career. 
Answer the following questions indicating your option for each question: 
1. The purist’s art is 
(a) one that arouses emotions 
(b) thought-provoking 
(c) technically sound 
(d) free from any encumbrances or concerns about what the world or anyone else might think of it 
2. The “realities of the marketplace” approach entails 
(a) “prostituting” one’s art by putting a dollar price on it 
(b) gauging the market value of one’s art and then putting a price on it 
(c) compromising on one’s estimation of one’s own art as far as its worth in financial terms is 
concerned 
(d) subjecting one’s art to the buyer’s interpretation of it 
(a) Only (a) 
(b) Only (b) and (d) 
 
 
(c) (b), (c) and (d) 
(d) only (b) 
3. For an artist to sell his piece of art at a higher price range, he/she has to 
(a) get endorsed by fellow artists and art critics 
(b) hold exhibitions or shows 
(c) gradually increase the collectability of his/her art in the market place 
(d) all of the above 
4. The first piece of an artist that comes out in the market is seen as 
(a) his masterpiece 
(b) the most collectible piece in his/her repertoire 
(c) a blueprint to discern the author’s unique style and point of view 
(d) the inspiration for all his subsequent work 
5. From the point of view of the purist, the irony as far as pricing art is concerned is that 
(A) a piece from his collection is eventually sold at the same price that he had estimated it to be its 
real worth years earlier 
(B) his art is subjected to the same market forces against which he strove his entire life 
(C) “realities of the marketplace” is a concept that negates the very attributes that we associate with 
art- whim, fancy and imagination 
(a) only (A) 
(b) (A) and (B) 
(c) only (B) 
(d) (A), (B) and (C). 
Directions (Questions 6 and 7): Each question consists of two capitalized words that have a certain 
relationship to each other, followed by 4 pair of words. Choose the pair that is related to each other in 
the same way as the capitalized pair. 
 
6. ENCUMBRANCE : BURDEN 
Page 4


 
 
ALL INDIA LAW ENTRANCE TEST (AILET) 2010 Question Paper 
Time: 1 hour 30 minutes                                                                             Total Marks: 150 
SECTION A : ENGLISH 
Read the passage and answer the questions following it: 
Artists should treat their art as art and take the process of making it as seriously as anyone takes their 
chosen profession. Great skill and insight are required in order to create truly original art. Transforming 
an idea or concept into a technically thought-provoking or emotion-arousing work of art in any medium 
is a talent that few people possess. And there you have the “purist’s vision.” 
Now if an artist wants to create art and never sell it, then he or she never has to worry about how to 
price it. That artist can afford to be a “purist,” as you put it, produce art free of any encumbrances or 
concerns about what the art world or any one else might think, and avoid “prostituting” or “debasing” 
that art by placing dollar values on it. But if you’re an artist who wants to sell your art or who has to sell 
it in order to survive as an artist, you must use whatever tools are available to figure out how much it’s 
worth and how best to sell it. 
Let’s say you’re just starting out as an artist, you have little or no experience showing or selling your 
work, and in a period of two minutes, you produce a pencil drawing on a piece of paper. You view this 
drawing as highly significant in your evolution as an artist and rank its creation as the single most 
important creative moment of your life. Consequently, you put a price of $20,000 on it because only for 
that amount of money will you agree to part with such an important work of art. This is a “purist’s 
vision” approach to pricing as opposed to a “realities of the marketplace” approach. 
From a business standpoint, you’ll have an extremely difficult time selling your drawing, as you won’t be 
able to justify the $20,000 price to real art buyers in the real art world. You have no track record of 
selling art in that price range, and you have few or no shows, critical reviews, or supporting data from 
outside sources indicating that your art has that kind of value or collectability in the marketplace. The 
overwhelming majority of art buyers who have $20,000 to spend look for works of art by established 
artists with documented track records of showing and selling art in that price range. 
Your drawing is still highly significant to you, but what someone is willing to pay for it on the open 
market is a matter for art buyers to decide. You can price it however you wish, but you can never force 
anyone to buy it. That’s the way the art business works. So if you want to sell it, you have to figure out 
what dollar amount someone is likely to pay for it on the open market and then price it at that amount. 
But the tale of your drawing does not end here. 
The art world may, one agree with you that the product of your two-minute moment precipitates a 
major transformational turning point in your career, and is well worth a $20,000 asking price, but you’re 
going to have to prove first. Aspects of that drawing will have to be reflected in your art from the 
moment you created it onwards, the art world will have to recognize your art both critically and from 
 
 
the marketing standpoints, and you’ll have to successfully produce, show, and sell for many years. Then 
one day, when your first retrospective exhibition opens at the Four-Star Museum of Art, that drawing 
will hang framed and captioned as the first inspiration for all subsequent work. The art world will then 
understand and respect its significance, and a serious collector may well be willing to pay an 
extraordinary price to own this historically important document of your career. 
Returning for a moment to the concept of a purist artist who creates art and never sells it, 
sooner or later (hopefully later), that purist will pass on and leave behind a body of work. Unless that 
artist leaves specific instructions in his or her Will for that body of work to be destroyed, it will become 
subject to those market forces that the artist strived for a life-time to avoid. At the very least, it’ll have 
to be appraised for tax, donation, or inheritance purposes. In most cases, it eventually comes onto the 
market either through a probable sale, an auction, or as represented by a dealer, gallery, or family 
member. 
The moral of the story is that one way or another, someone somewhere at some point in time will use 
tried and true methods to realistically price and either sell, donate, trade or otherwise transact any work 
of art that comes onto the market in any way, shape, or form. I hope that that person will be you, the 
artist, and that you’ll price your art according to what the market will bear, sell plenty of it, and have a 
long and rewarding career. 
Answer the following questions indicating your option for each question: 
1. The purist’s art is 
(a) one that arouses emotions 
(b) thought-provoking 
(c) technically sound 
(d) free from any encumbrances or concerns about what the world or anyone else might think of it 
2. The “realities of the marketplace” approach entails 
(a) “prostituting” one’s art by putting a dollar price on it 
(b) gauging the market value of one’s art and then putting a price on it 
(c) compromising on one’s estimation of one’s own art as far as its worth in financial terms is 
concerned 
(d) subjecting one’s art to the buyer’s interpretation of it 
(a) Only (a) 
(b) Only (b) and (d) 
 
 
(c) (b), (c) and (d) 
(d) only (b) 
3. For an artist to sell his piece of art at a higher price range, he/she has to 
(a) get endorsed by fellow artists and art critics 
(b) hold exhibitions or shows 
(c) gradually increase the collectability of his/her art in the market place 
(d) all of the above 
4. The first piece of an artist that comes out in the market is seen as 
(a) his masterpiece 
(b) the most collectible piece in his/her repertoire 
(c) a blueprint to discern the author’s unique style and point of view 
(d) the inspiration for all his subsequent work 
5. From the point of view of the purist, the irony as far as pricing art is concerned is that 
(A) a piece from his collection is eventually sold at the same price that he had estimated it to be its 
real worth years earlier 
(B) his art is subjected to the same market forces against which he strove his entire life 
(C) “realities of the marketplace” is a concept that negates the very attributes that we associate with 
art- whim, fancy and imagination 
(a) only (A) 
(b) (A) and (B) 
(c) only (B) 
(d) (A), (B) and (C). 
Directions (Questions 6 and 7): Each question consists of two capitalized words that have a certain 
relationship to each other, followed by 4 pair of words. Choose the pair that is related to each other in 
the same way as the capitalized pair. 
 
6. ENCUMBRANCE : BURDEN 
 
 
(a) Mnemonic : Memory 
(b) Blatant : Subtle 
(c) Captious : Acrimonious 
(d) Feral : Cultured 
7. SUBSEQUENT : PREVIOUS 
(a) Significant : Inconsequential 
(b) Retrospect : Retrospective 
(c) Visionary : Seer 
(d) Caption : Legend 
8. The synonym of the word PRECIPITATE in the context of the passage is 
(a) launch 
(b) trigger 
(c) provoke 
(d) accelerate 
Complete the sentences by filling in the blanks with the correct tenses from the given choices by 
indicating your option for each question: 
9. I wish you ………….. louder as I can’t hear what you say. 
(a) were speaking 
(b) spoke 
(c) would speak 
(d) speak 
10. The audience ________ to take their seats please. 
(a) is requested 
(b) have requested 
(c) may request 
(d) are requested 
Page 5


 
 
ALL INDIA LAW ENTRANCE TEST (AILET) 2010 Question Paper 
Time: 1 hour 30 minutes                                                                             Total Marks: 150 
SECTION A : ENGLISH 
Read the passage and answer the questions following it: 
Artists should treat their art as art and take the process of making it as seriously as anyone takes their 
chosen profession. Great skill and insight are required in order to create truly original art. Transforming 
an idea or concept into a technically thought-provoking or emotion-arousing work of art in any medium 
is a talent that few people possess. And there you have the “purist’s vision.” 
Now if an artist wants to create art and never sell it, then he or she never has to worry about how to 
price it. That artist can afford to be a “purist,” as you put it, produce art free of any encumbrances or 
concerns about what the art world or any one else might think, and avoid “prostituting” or “debasing” 
that art by placing dollar values on it. But if you’re an artist who wants to sell your art or who has to sell 
it in order to survive as an artist, you must use whatever tools are available to figure out how much it’s 
worth and how best to sell it. 
Let’s say you’re just starting out as an artist, you have little or no experience showing or selling your 
work, and in a period of two minutes, you produce a pencil drawing on a piece of paper. You view this 
drawing as highly significant in your evolution as an artist and rank its creation as the single most 
important creative moment of your life. Consequently, you put a price of $20,000 on it because only for 
that amount of money will you agree to part with such an important work of art. This is a “purist’s 
vision” approach to pricing as opposed to a “realities of the marketplace” approach. 
From a business standpoint, you’ll have an extremely difficult time selling your drawing, as you won’t be 
able to justify the $20,000 price to real art buyers in the real art world. You have no track record of 
selling art in that price range, and you have few or no shows, critical reviews, or supporting data from 
outside sources indicating that your art has that kind of value or collectability in the marketplace. The 
overwhelming majority of art buyers who have $20,000 to spend look for works of art by established 
artists with documented track records of showing and selling art in that price range. 
Your drawing is still highly significant to you, but what someone is willing to pay for it on the open 
market is a matter for art buyers to decide. You can price it however you wish, but you can never force 
anyone to buy it. That’s the way the art business works. So if you want to sell it, you have to figure out 
what dollar amount someone is likely to pay for it on the open market and then price it at that amount. 
But the tale of your drawing does not end here. 
The art world may, one agree with you that the product of your two-minute moment precipitates a 
major transformational turning point in your career, and is well worth a $20,000 asking price, but you’re 
going to have to prove first. Aspects of that drawing will have to be reflected in your art from the 
moment you created it onwards, the art world will have to recognize your art both critically and from 
 
 
the marketing standpoints, and you’ll have to successfully produce, show, and sell for many years. Then 
one day, when your first retrospective exhibition opens at the Four-Star Museum of Art, that drawing 
will hang framed and captioned as the first inspiration for all subsequent work. The art world will then 
understand and respect its significance, and a serious collector may well be willing to pay an 
extraordinary price to own this historically important document of your career. 
Returning for a moment to the concept of a purist artist who creates art and never sells it, 
sooner or later (hopefully later), that purist will pass on and leave behind a body of work. Unless that 
artist leaves specific instructions in his or her Will for that body of work to be destroyed, it will become 
subject to those market forces that the artist strived for a life-time to avoid. At the very least, it’ll have 
to be appraised for tax, donation, or inheritance purposes. In most cases, it eventually comes onto the 
market either through a probable sale, an auction, or as represented by a dealer, gallery, or family 
member. 
The moral of the story is that one way or another, someone somewhere at some point in time will use 
tried and true methods to realistically price and either sell, donate, trade or otherwise transact any work 
of art that comes onto the market in any way, shape, or form. I hope that that person will be you, the 
artist, and that you’ll price your art according to what the market will bear, sell plenty of it, and have a 
long and rewarding career. 
Answer the following questions indicating your option for each question: 
1. The purist’s art is 
(a) one that arouses emotions 
(b) thought-provoking 
(c) technically sound 
(d) free from any encumbrances or concerns about what the world or anyone else might think of it 
2. The “realities of the marketplace” approach entails 
(a) “prostituting” one’s art by putting a dollar price on it 
(b) gauging the market value of one’s art and then putting a price on it 
(c) compromising on one’s estimation of one’s own art as far as its worth in financial terms is 
concerned 
(d) subjecting one’s art to the buyer’s interpretation of it 
(a) Only (a) 
(b) Only (b) and (d) 
 
 
(c) (b), (c) and (d) 
(d) only (b) 
3. For an artist to sell his piece of art at a higher price range, he/she has to 
(a) get endorsed by fellow artists and art critics 
(b) hold exhibitions or shows 
(c) gradually increase the collectability of his/her art in the market place 
(d) all of the above 
4. The first piece of an artist that comes out in the market is seen as 
(a) his masterpiece 
(b) the most collectible piece in his/her repertoire 
(c) a blueprint to discern the author’s unique style and point of view 
(d) the inspiration for all his subsequent work 
5. From the point of view of the purist, the irony as far as pricing art is concerned is that 
(A) a piece from his collection is eventually sold at the same price that he had estimated it to be its 
real worth years earlier 
(B) his art is subjected to the same market forces against which he strove his entire life 
(C) “realities of the marketplace” is a concept that negates the very attributes that we associate with 
art- whim, fancy and imagination 
(a) only (A) 
(b) (A) and (B) 
(c) only (B) 
(d) (A), (B) and (C). 
Directions (Questions 6 and 7): Each question consists of two capitalized words that have a certain 
relationship to each other, followed by 4 pair of words. Choose the pair that is related to each other in 
the same way as the capitalized pair. 
 
6. ENCUMBRANCE : BURDEN 
 
 
(a) Mnemonic : Memory 
(b) Blatant : Subtle 
(c) Captious : Acrimonious 
(d) Feral : Cultured 
7. SUBSEQUENT : PREVIOUS 
(a) Significant : Inconsequential 
(b) Retrospect : Retrospective 
(c) Visionary : Seer 
(d) Caption : Legend 
8. The synonym of the word PRECIPITATE in the context of the passage is 
(a) launch 
(b) trigger 
(c) provoke 
(d) accelerate 
Complete the sentences by filling in the blanks with the correct tenses from the given choices by 
indicating your option for each question: 
9. I wish you ………….. louder as I can’t hear what you say. 
(a) were speaking 
(b) spoke 
(c) would speak 
(d) speak 
10. The audience ________ to take their seats please. 
(a) is requested 
(b) have requested 
(c) may request 
(d) are requested 
 
 
11. It ______ all day yesterday before the garden wall collapsed. 
(a) rained 
(b) has been raining 
(c) had rained 
(d) was raining 
12. Each member of this grout ______ guilty. 
(a) is 
(b) are 
(c) is being 
(d) were 
13. The Prime Minister _____ to visit the hospital tomorrow. 
(a) will 
(b) is 
(c) must 
(d) have 
14. Last night the radio said that the volcano, Etna, in Sicily …………. 
(a) will erupt 
(b) is erupting 
(c) erupts 
(d) has to erupt 
15. They say that the Princess _______ incognito at the Sheraton. 
(a) have stayed 
(b) is staying 
(c) stay 
(d) will have been staying 
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