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CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Sociologists working in the Chicago School tradition have focused on how rapid or dramatic 
social change causes increases in crime. Just as Durkheim, Marx, Toennies, and other 
European sociologists thought that the rapid changes produced by industrialization and 
urbanization produced crime and disorder, so too did the Chicago School theorists. The 
location of the University of Chicago provided an excellent opportunity for Park, Burgess, and 
McKenzie to study the social ecology of the city. Shaw and McKay found . . . that areas of the 
city characterized by high levels of social disorganization had higher rates of crime and 
delinquency. 
In the 1920s and 1930s Chicago, like many American cities, experienced considerable 
immigration. Rapid population growth is a disorganizing influence, but growth resulting from 
in-migration of very different people is particularly disruptive. Chicago’s in-migrants were 
both native-born whites and blacks from rural areas and small towns, and foreign immigrants. 
The heavy industry of cities like Chicago, Detroit, and Pittsburgh drew those seeking 
opportunities and new lives. Farmers and villagers from America’s hinterland, like their 
European cousins of whom Durkheim wrote, moved in large numbers into cities. At the start 
of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately a rural population, but by the 
century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas. The social lives of these migrants, as well as 
those already living in the cities they moved to, were disrupted by the differences between 
urban and rural life. According to social disorganization theory, until the social ecology of the 
‘‘new place’’ can adapt, this rapid change is a criminogenic influence. But most rural migrants, 
and even many of the foreign immigrants to the city, looked like and eventually spoke the 
same language as the natives of the cities into which they moved. These similarities allowed 
for more rapid social integration for these migrants than was the case for African Americans 
and most foreign immigrants. 
In these same decades America experienced what has been called ‘‘the great migration’’: the 
massive movement of African Americans out of the rural South and into northern (and some 
Page 2


CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Sociologists working in the Chicago School tradition have focused on how rapid or dramatic 
social change causes increases in crime. Just as Durkheim, Marx, Toennies, and other 
European sociologists thought that the rapid changes produced by industrialization and 
urbanization produced crime and disorder, so too did the Chicago School theorists. The 
location of the University of Chicago provided an excellent opportunity for Park, Burgess, and 
McKenzie to study the social ecology of the city. Shaw and McKay found . . . that areas of the 
city characterized by high levels of social disorganization had higher rates of crime and 
delinquency. 
In the 1920s and 1930s Chicago, like many American cities, experienced considerable 
immigration. Rapid population growth is a disorganizing influence, but growth resulting from 
in-migration of very different people is particularly disruptive. Chicago’s in-migrants were 
both native-born whites and blacks from rural areas and small towns, and foreign immigrants. 
The heavy industry of cities like Chicago, Detroit, and Pittsburgh drew those seeking 
opportunities and new lives. Farmers and villagers from America’s hinterland, like their 
European cousins of whom Durkheim wrote, moved in large numbers into cities. At the start 
of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately a rural population, but by the 
century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas. The social lives of these migrants, as well as 
those already living in the cities they moved to, were disrupted by the differences between 
urban and rural life. According to social disorganization theory, until the social ecology of the 
‘‘new place’’ can adapt, this rapid change is a criminogenic influence. But most rural migrants, 
and even many of the foreign immigrants to the city, looked like and eventually spoke the 
same language as the natives of the cities into which they moved. These similarities allowed 
for more rapid social integration for these migrants than was the case for African Americans 
and most foreign immigrants. 
In these same decades America experienced what has been called ‘‘the great migration’’: the 
massive movement of African Americans out of the rural South and into northern (and some 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
https://bodheeprep.com 
 
southern) cities. The scale of this migration is one of the most dramatic in human history. 
These migrants, unlike their white counterparts, were not integrated into the cities they now 
called home. In fact, most American cities at the end of the twentieth century were 
characterized by high levels of racial residential segregation . . . Failure to integrate these 
migrants, coupled with other forces of social disorganization such as crowding, poverty, and 
illness, caused crime rates to climb in the cities, particularly in the segregated wards and 
neighborhoods where the migrants were forced to live. 
Foreign immigrants during this period did not look as dramatically different from the rest of 
the population as blacks did, but the migrants from eastern and southern Europe who came 
to American cities did not speak English, and were frequently Catholic, while the native born 
were mostly Protestant. The combination of rapid population growth with the diversity of 
those moving into the cities created what the Chicago School sociologists called social 
disorganization. 
Q.1) 
A fundamental conclusion by the author is that: 
[1] the best circumstances for crime to flourish are when there are severe racial disparities. 
[2] to prevent crime, it is important to maintain social order through maintaining social 
segregation. 
[3] according to European sociologists, crime in America is mainly in Chicago. 
[4] rapid population growth and demographic diversity give rise to social disorganisation that 
can feed the growth of crime. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following sets of words/phrases best encapsulates the issues discussed in 
the passage? 
[1] Durkheim; Marx; Toennies; Shaw 
[2] Chicago School; Native-born Whites; European immigrants; Poverty 
[3] Chicago School; Social organisation; Migration; Crime 
[4] Rapid population growth; Heavy industry; Segregation; Crime 
 
Page 3


CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Sociologists working in the Chicago School tradition have focused on how rapid or dramatic 
social change causes increases in crime. Just as Durkheim, Marx, Toennies, and other 
European sociologists thought that the rapid changes produced by industrialization and 
urbanization produced crime and disorder, so too did the Chicago School theorists. The 
location of the University of Chicago provided an excellent opportunity for Park, Burgess, and 
McKenzie to study the social ecology of the city. Shaw and McKay found . . . that areas of the 
city characterized by high levels of social disorganization had higher rates of crime and 
delinquency. 
In the 1920s and 1930s Chicago, like many American cities, experienced considerable 
immigration. Rapid population growth is a disorganizing influence, but growth resulting from 
in-migration of very different people is particularly disruptive. Chicago’s in-migrants were 
both native-born whites and blacks from rural areas and small towns, and foreign immigrants. 
The heavy industry of cities like Chicago, Detroit, and Pittsburgh drew those seeking 
opportunities and new lives. Farmers and villagers from America’s hinterland, like their 
European cousins of whom Durkheim wrote, moved in large numbers into cities. At the start 
of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately a rural population, but by the 
century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas. The social lives of these migrants, as well as 
those already living in the cities they moved to, were disrupted by the differences between 
urban and rural life. According to social disorganization theory, until the social ecology of the 
‘‘new place’’ can adapt, this rapid change is a criminogenic influence. But most rural migrants, 
and even many of the foreign immigrants to the city, looked like and eventually spoke the 
same language as the natives of the cities into which they moved. These similarities allowed 
for more rapid social integration for these migrants than was the case for African Americans 
and most foreign immigrants. 
In these same decades America experienced what has been called ‘‘the great migration’’: the 
massive movement of African Americans out of the rural South and into northern (and some 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
https://bodheeprep.com 
 
southern) cities. The scale of this migration is one of the most dramatic in human history. 
These migrants, unlike their white counterparts, were not integrated into the cities they now 
called home. In fact, most American cities at the end of the twentieth century were 
characterized by high levels of racial residential segregation . . . Failure to integrate these 
migrants, coupled with other forces of social disorganization such as crowding, poverty, and 
illness, caused crime rates to climb in the cities, particularly in the segregated wards and 
neighborhoods where the migrants were forced to live. 
Foreign immigrants during this period did not look as dramatically different from the rest of 
the population as blacks did, but the migrants from eastern and southern Europe who came 
to American cities did not speak English, and were frequently Catholic, while the native born 
were mostly Protestant. The combination of rapid population growth with the diversity of 
those moving into the cities created what the Chicago School sociologists called social 
disorganization. 
Q.1) 
A fundamental conclusion by the author is that: 
[1] the best circumstances for crime to flourish are when there are severe racial disparities. 
[2] to prevent crime, it is important to maintain social order through maintaining social 
segregation. 
[3] according to European sociologists, crime in America is mainly in Chicago. 
[4] rapid population growth and demographic diversity give rise to social disorganisation that 
can feed the growth of crime. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following sets of words/phrases best encapsulates the issues discussed in 
the passage? 
[1] Durkheim; Marx; Toennies; Shaw 
[2] Chicago School; Native-born Whites; European immigrants; Poverty 
[3] Chicago School; Social organisation; Migration; Crime 
[4] Rapid population growth; Heavy industry; Segregation; Crime 
 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following is not a valid inference from the passage? 
[1] The differences between urban and rural lifestyles were crucial factors in the disruption 
experienced by migrants to American cities. 
[2] According to social disorganisation theory, the social integration of African American 
migrants into Chicago was slower because they were less organised. 
[3] According to social disorganisation theory, fast-paced social change provides fertile 
ground for the rapid growth of crime. 
[4] The failure to integrate in-migrants, along with social problems like poverty, was a 
significant reason for the rise in crime in American cities. 
Q.4) 
The author notes that, “At the start of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately 
a rural population, but by the century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas.” Which one of 
the following statements, if true, does not contradict this statement? 
[1] Demographic transition in America in the twentieth century is strongly marked by an out-
migration from rural areas. 
[2] The estimation of per capita income in America in the mid-twentieth century primarily 
required data from rural areas. 
[3] Economists have found that throughout the twentieth century, the size of the labour force 
in America has always been largest in rural areas. 
[4] A population census conducted in 1952 showed that more Americans lived in rural areas 
than in urban ones. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 4


CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Sociologists working in the Chicago School tradition have focused on how rapid or dramatic 
social change causes increases in crime. Just as Durkheim, Marx, Toennies, and other 
European sociologists thought that the rapid changes produced by industrialization and 
urbanization produced crime and disorder, so too did the Chicago School theorists. The 
location of the University of Chicago provided an excellent opportunity for Park, Burgess, and 
McKenzie to study the social ecology of the city. Shaw and McKay found . . . that areas of the 
city characterized by high levels of social disorganization had higher rates of crime and 
delinquency. 
In the 1920s and 1930s Chicago, like many American cities, experienced considerable 
immigration. Rapid population growth is a disorganizing influence, but growth resulting from 
in-migration of very different people is particularly disruptive. Chicago’s in-migrants were 
both native-born whites and blacks from rural areas and small towns, and foreign immigrants. 
The heavy industry of cities like Chicago, Detroit, and Pittsburgh drew those seeking 
opportunities and new lives. Farmers and villagers from America’s hinterland, like their 
European cousins of whom Durkheim wrote, moved in large numbers into cities. At the start 
of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately a rural population, but by the 
century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas. The social lives of these migrants, as well as 
those already living in the cities they moved to, were disrupted by the differences between 
urban and rural life. According to social disorganization theory, until the social ecology of the 
‘‘new place’’ can adapt, this rapid change is a criminogenic influence. But most rural migrants, 
and even many of the foreign immigrants to the city, looked like and eventually spoke the 
same language as the natives of the cities into which they moved. These similarities allowed 
for more rapid social integration for these migrants than was the case for African Americans 
and most foreign immigrants. 
In these same decades America experienced what has been called ‘‘the great migration’’: the 
massive movement of African Americans out of the rural South and into northern (and some 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
https://bodheeprep.com 
 
southern) cities. The scale of this migration is one of the most dramatic in human history. 
These migrants, unlike their white counterparts, were not integrated into the cities they now 
called home. In fact, most American cities at the end of the twentieth century were 
characterized by high levels of racial residential segregation . . . Failure to integrate these 
migrants, coupled with other forces of social disorganization such as crowding, poverty, and 
illness, caused crime rates to climb in the cities, particularly in the segregated wards and 
neighborhoods where the migrants were forced to live. 
Foreign immigrants during this period did not look as dramatically different from the rest of 
the population as blacks did, but the migrants from eastern and southern Europe who came 
to American cities did not speak English, and were frequently Catholic, while the native born 
were mostly Protestant. The combination of rapid population growth with the diversity of 
those moving into the cities created what the Chicago School sociologists called social 
disorganization. 
Q.1) 
A fundamental conclusion by the author is that: 
[1] the best circumstances for crime to flourish are when there are severe racial disparities. 
[2] to prevent crime, it is important to maintain social order through maintaining social 
segregation. 
[3] according to European sociologists, crime in America is mainly in Chicago. 
[4] rapid population growth and demographic diversity give rise to social disorganisation that 
can feed the growth of crime. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following sets of words/phrases best encapsulates the issues discussed in 
the passage? 
[1] Durkheim; Marx; Toennies; Shaw 
[2] Chicago School; Native-born Whites; European immigrants; Poverty 
[3] Chicago School; Social organisation; Migration; Crime 
[4] Rapid population growth; Heavy industry; Segregation; Crime 
 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following is not a valid inference from the passage? 
[1] The differences between urban and rural lifestyles were crucial factors in the disruption 
experienced by migrants to American cities. 
[2] According to social disorganisation theory, the social integration of African American 
migrants into Chicago was slower because they were less organised. 
[3] According to social disorganisation theory, fast-paced social change provides fertile 
ground for the rapid growth of crime. 
[4] The failure to integrate in-migrants, along with social problems like poverty, was a 
significant reason for the rise in crime in American cities. 
Q.4) 
The author notes that, “At the start of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately 
a rural population, but by the century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas.” Which one of 
the following statements, if true, does not contradict this statement? 
[1] Demographic transition in America in the twentieth century is strongly marked by an out-
migration from rural areas. 
[2] The estimation of per capita income in America in the mid-twentieth century primarily 
required data from rural areas. 
[3] Economists have found that throughout the twentieth century, the size of the labour force 
in America has always been largest in rural areas. 
[4] A population census conducted in 1952 showed that more Americans lived in rural areas 
than in urban ones. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Interpretations of the Indian past . . . were inevitably influenced by colonial concerns and 
interests, and also by prevalent European ideas about history, civilization and the Orient. 
Orientalist scholars studied the languages and the texts with selected Indian scholars, but 
made little attempt to understand the world-view of those who were teaching them. The 
readings therefore are something of a disjuncture from the traditional ways of looking at the 
Indian past. . . . 
Orientalism [which we can understand broadly as Western perceptions of the Orient] fuelled 
the fantasy and the freedom sought by European Romanticism, particularly in its opposition 
to the more disciplined Neo-Classicism. The cultures of Asia were seen as bringing a new 
Romantic paradigm. Another Renaissance was anticipated through an acquaintance with the 
Orient, and this, it was thought, would be different from the earlier Greek Renaissance. It was 
believed that this Oriental Renaissance would liberate European thought and literature from 
the increasing focus on discipline and rationality that had followed from the earlier 
Enlightenment. . . . [The Romantic English poets, Wordsworth and Coleridge,] were 
apprehensive of the changes introduced by industrialization and turned to nature and to 
fantasies of the Orient. 
However, this enthusiasm gradually changed, to conform with the emphasis later in the 
nineteenth century on the innate superiority of European civilization. Oriental civilizations 
were now seen as having once been great but currently in decline. The various phases of 
Orientalism tended to mould European understanding of the Indian past into a particular 
pattern. . . . There was an attempt to formulate Indian culture as uniform, such formulations 
being derived from texts that were given priority. The so-called ‘discovery’ of India was 
largely through selected literature in Sanskrit. This interpretation tended to emphasize non-
historical aspects of Indian culture, for example the idea of an unchanging continuity of 
society and religion over 3,000 years; and it was believed that the Indian pattern of life was 
so concerned with metaphysics and the subtleties of religious belief that little attention was 
given to the more tangible aspects. 
Page 5


CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 VARC Section 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Sociologists working in the Chicago School tradition have focused on how rapid or dramatic 
social change causes increases in crime. Just as Durkheim, Marx, Toennies, and other 
European sociologists thought that the rapid changes produced by industrialization and 
urbanization produced crime and disorder, so too did the Chicago School theorists. The 
location of the University of Chicago provided an excellent opportunity for Park, Burgess, and 
McKenzie to study the social ecology of the city. Shaw and McKay found . . . that areas of the 
city characterized by high levels of social disorganization had higher rates of crime and 
delinquency. 
In the 1920s and 1930s Chicago, like many American cities, experienced considerable 
immigration. Rapid population growth is a disorganizing influence, but growth resulting from 
in-migration of very different people is particularly disruptive. Chicago’s in-migrants were 
both native-born whites and blacks from rural areas and small towns, and foreign immigrants. 
The heavy industry of cities like Chicago, Detroit, and Pittsburgh drew those seeking 
opportunities and new lives. Farmers and villagers from America’s hinterland, like their 
European cousins of whom Durkheim wrote, moved in large numbers into cities. At the start 
of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately a rural population, but by the 
century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas. The social lives of these migrants, as well as 
those already living in the cities they moved to, were disrupted by the differences between 
urban and rural life. According to social disorganization theory, until the social ecology of the 
‘‘new place’’ can adapt, this rapid change is a criminogenic influence. But most rural migrants, 
and even many of the foreign immigrants to the city, looked like and eventually spoke the 
same language as the natives of the cities into which they moved. These similarities allowed 
for more rapid social integration for these migrants than was the case for African Americans 
and most foreign immigrants. 
In these same decades America experienced what has been called ‘‘the great migration’’: the 
massive movement of African Americans out of the rural South and into northern (and some 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
https://bodheeprep.com 
 
southern) cities. The scale of this migration is one of the most dramatic in human history. 
These migrants, unlike their white counterparts, were not integrated into the cities they now 
called home. In fact, most American cities at the end of the twentieth century were 
characterized by high levels of racial residential segregation . . . Failure to integrate these 
migrants, coupled with other forces of social disorganization such as crowding, poverty, and 
illness, caused crime rates to climb in the cities, particularly in the segregated wards and 
neighborhoods where the migrants were forced to live. 
Foreign immigrants during this period did not look as dramatically different from the rest of 
the population as blacks did, but the migrants from eastern and southern Europe who came 
to American cities did not speak English, and were frequently Catholic, while the native born 
were mostly Protestant. The combination of rapid population growth with the diversity of 
those moving into the cities created what the Chicago School sociologists called social 
disorganization. 
Q.1) 
A fundamental conclusion by the author is that: 
[1] the best circumstances for crime to flourish are when there are severe racial disparities. 
[2] to prevent crime, it is important to maintain social order through maintaining social 
segregation. 
[3] according to European sociologists, crime in America is mainly in Chicago. 
[4] rapid population growth and demographic diversity give rise to social disorganisation that 
can feed the growth of crime. 
Q.2) 
Which one of the following sets of words/phrases best encapsulates the issues discussed in 
the passage? 
[1] Durkheim; Marx; Toennies; Shaw 
[2] Chicago School; Native-born Whites; European immigrants; Poverty 
[3] Chicago School; Social organisation; Migration; Crime 
[4] Rapid population growth; Heavy industry; Segregation; Crime 
 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
Q.3) 
Which one of the following is not a valid inference from the passage? 
[1] The differences between urban and rural lifestyles were crucial factors in the disruption 
experienced by migrants to American cities. 
[2] According to social disorganisation theory, the social integration of African American 
migrants into Chicago was slower because they were less organised. 
[3] According to social disorganisation theory, fast-paced social change provides fertile 
ground for the rapid growth of crime. 
[4] The failure to integrate in-migrants, along with social problems like poverty, was a 
significant reason for the rise in crime in American cities. 
Q.4) 
The author notes that, “At the start of the twentieth century, Americans were predominately 
a rural population, but by the century’s mid-point most lived in urban areas.” Which one of 
the following statements, if true, does not contradict this statement? 
[1] Demographic transition in America in the twentieth century is strongly marked by an out-
migration from rural areas. 
[2] The estimation of per capita income in America in the mid-twentieth century primarily 
required data from rural areas. 
[3] Economists have found that throughout the twentieth century, the size of the labour force 
in America has always been largest in rural areas. 
[4] A population census conducted in 1952 showed that more Americans lived in rural areas 
than in urban ones. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
The passage below is accompanied by a set of questions. Choose the best answer to each 
question. 
Interpretations of the Indian past . . . were inevitably influenced by colonial concerns and 
interests, and also by prevalent European ideas about history, civilization and the Orient. 
Orientalist scholars studied the languages and the texts with selected Indian scholars, but 
made little attempt to understand the world-view of those who were teaching them. The 
readings therefore are something of a disjuncture from the traditional ways of looking at the 
Indian past. . . . 
Orientalism [which we can understand broadly as Western perceptions of the Orient] fuelled 
the fantasy and the freedom sought by European Romanticism, particularly in its opposition 
to the more disciplined Neo-Classicism. The cultures of Asia were seen as bringing a new 
Romantic paradigm. Another Renaissance was anticipated through an acquaintance with the 
Orient, and this, it was thought, would be different from the earlier Greek Renaissance. It was 
believed that this Oriental Renaissance would liberate European thought and literature from 
the increasing focus on discipline and rationality that had followed from the earlier 
Enlightenment. . . . [The Romantic English poets, Wordsworth and Coleridge,] were 
apprehensive of the changes introduced by industrialization and turned to nature and to 
fantasies of the Orient. 
However, this enthusiasm gradually changed, to conform with the emphasis later in the 
nineteenth century on the innate superiority of European civilization. Oriental civilizations 
were now seen as having once been great but currently in decline. The various phases of 
Orientalism tended to mould European understanding of the Indian past into a particular 
pattern. . . . There was an attempt to formulate Indian culture as uniform, such formulations 
being derived from texts that were given priority. The so-called ‘discovery’ of India was 
largely through selected literature in Sanskrit. This interpretation tended to emphasize non-
historical aspects of Indian culture, for example the idea of an unchanging continuity of 
society and religion over 3,000 years; and it was believed that the Indian pattern of life was 
so concerned with metaphysics and the subtleties of religious belief that little attention was 
given to the more tangible aspects. 
CAT 2023 Question Paper slot 3 
 
 
 
German Romanticism endorsed this image of India, and it became the mystic land for many 
Europeans, where even the most ordinary actions were imbued with a complex symbolism. 
This was the genesis of the idea of the spiritual east, and also, incidentally, the refuge of 
European intellectuals seeking to distance themselves from the changing patterns of their 
own societies. A dichotomy in values was maintained, Indian values being described as 
‘spiritual’ and European values as ‘materialistic’, with little attempt to juxtapose these values 
with the reality of Indian society. This theme has been even more firmly endorsed by a 
section of Indian opinion during the last hundred years. 
It was a consolation to the Indian intelligentsia for its perceived inability to counter the 
technical superiority of the west, a superiority viewed as having enabled Europe to colonize 
Asia and other parts of the world. At the height of anti-colonial nationalism it acted as a salve 
for having been made a colony of Britain. 
Q.5) 
It can be inferred from the passage that to gain a more accurate view of a nation’s history 
and culture, scholars should do all of the following EXCEPT: 
[1] examine their own beliefs and biases. 
[2] develop an oppositional framework to grasp cultural differences. 
[3] examine the complex reality of that nation’s society. 
[4] read widely in the country’s literature. 
Q.6) 
In the context of the passage, all of the following statements are true EXCEPT: 
[1] India’s spiritualism served as a salve for European colonisers. 
[2] Orientalists’ understanding of Indian history was linked to colonial concerns. 
[3] Indian texts influenced Orientalist scholars. 
[4] Orientalist scholarship influenced Indians. 
Q.7) 
It can be inferred from the passage that the author is not likely to support the view that: 
[1] India’s culture has evolved over the centuries. 
[2] Indian culture acknowledges the material aspects of life. 
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FAQs on CAT 2022 Slot 3: Past Year Question Paper with Answer key - CAT Mock Test Series 2024

1. What is CAT 2022?
Ans. CAT 2022 refers to the Common Admission Test conducted in the year 2022. It is a national-level entrance exam in India for admission to various management programs offered by prestigious business schools.
2. When will CAT 2022 Slot 3 be held?
Ans. The exact date for CAT 2022 Slot 3 has not been mentioned in the article. The schedule for CAT exams is usually announced by the conducting body, which is the Indian Institute of Management (IIM). Aspirants are advised to regularly check the official website of CAT for updates on the exam dates.
3. Can I get the past year question paper for CAT 2022 Slot 3?
Ans. The article mentions the availability of the past year question paper for CAT 2022 Slot 3. However, the specific details regarding where and how to obtain the question paper are not provided. It is recommended to visit the official website of CAT or refer to reliable sources that offer past year question papers for CAT exams.
4. Is it important to solve past year question papers for CAT preparation?
Ans. Yes, solving past year question papers is crucial for CAT preparation. It helps candidates understand the exam pattern, identify important topics, and get familiar with the types of questions asked in the exam. By practicing with past year question papers, candidates can improve their time management skills and enhance their overall performance in the CAT exam.
5. Where can I find the answer key for CAT 2022 Slot 3?
Ans. The article does not mention the availability of the answer key for CAT 2022 Slot 3. However, the conducting body, IIM, usually releases the answer key on their official website after the completion of the exam. Candidates can visit the official website or refer to reliable coaching institutes that provide the answer key for CAT exams.
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