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Class 10 Novels
70 Docs | 5 Tests
Romeo and Juliet- Summary, Themes & Characters
75 Docs
The Odyssey by Homer- Summary, Themes & Characters
97 Docs
The Story of My Experiments with Truth - Summary & Themes
146 Docs
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest-Summary, Themes & Characters
68 Docs
Hamlet- Summary, Themes & Characters
59 Docs
A Christmas Carol - Summary, Themes & Characters
50 Docs
Julius Caesar- Summary, Themes & Characters
56 Docs
David Copperfield - Summary, Themes & Characters
154 Docs
The Purloined Letter - Summary, Themes & Characters
13 Docs
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov- Summary, Themes & Characters
64 Docs
Oliver Twist - Summary, Themes & Characters
101 Docs
A Midsummer Night's Dream - Summary, Themes & Characters
52 Docs
The God of Small Things- Summary, Themes & Characters
36 Docs
The Catcher in the Rye- Summary, Themes & Characters
87 Docs
King Lear - Summary, Themes & Characters
67 Docs
A Tale of Two Cities - Summary, Themes & Characters
87 Docs
Animal Farm - Summary, Themes & Characters
36 Docs
Indian Camp - Summary, Themes & Characters
26 Docs
The Namesake - Summary, Themes & Characters
30 Docs
The Portrait of a Lady -Summary, Themes & Characters
105 Docs
Paradise Lost - Summary, Themes & Characters
24 Docs
Les Misérables by Victor Hugo- Summary, Themes & Characters
83 Docs
The Old Man and the Sea - Summary, Themes & Characters
41 Docs
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - Summary & Themes
19 Docs
To Kill a Mockingbird - Summary, Themes & Characters
66 Docs
The Autobiography of Malcolm X -Summary, Themes & Characters
59 Docs
Midnight's Children- Summary, Themes & Characters
47 Docs
Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption -Summary & Themes
16 Docs
The Revolutionist- Summary, Themes & Characters
29 Docs
The Great Gatsby - Summary, Themes & Characters
31 Docs
Shantaram - Summary, Themes and Characters
61 Docs
The Fall of the House of Usher - Summary and Themes
9 Docs
1984 - Summary, Themes & Characters
40 Docs
Anthem by Ayn Rand - Summary, Themes and Characters
27 Docs
Atlas Shrugged - Summary, Themes and Characters
103 Docs
William Wilson - Summary, Themes and Characters
8 Docs
The Fountainhead - Summary, Themes and Characters
79 Docs
The Communist Manifesto - Summary, Themes & Characters
18 Docs
Current Affairs & Hindu Analysis: Daily, Weekly & Monthly
4198 Docs | 39 Videos | 926 Tests
Chemistry Class 12
354 Docs | 135 Videos | 182 Tests
Physics Class 11
407 Docs | 102 Videos | 121 Tests
Chemistry Class 11
309 Docs | 172 Videos | 152 Tests
Physics Class 12
414 Docs | 105 Videos | 114 Tests
Biology Class 12
377 Docs | 139 Videos | 221 Tests
CSAT Preparation
139 Docs | 214 Videos | 151 Tests
Environment for UPSC CSE
192 Docs | 98 Videos | 52 Tests
Social Studies (SST) Class 10
500 Docs | 89 Videos | 131 Tests
Science Class 10
475 Docs | 112 Videos | 113 Tests
Oxford Student ATLAS: Maps & Tests
104 Docs | 17 Videos | 133 Tests
Docs & Videos View All
Novels, Society & History
40 Views
Reginald Little - Characters, The Autobiography Of Malcolm X
29 Views
Thénardier - Characters, Les Misérables
22 Views
Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory - Analysis, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
20 Views
Gertrude Levine, Harris Macklin and George Something - Characters, The Catcher in the Rye
15 Views
Chapter 23 - Summary, The Catcher in the Rye
15 Views
Maudie Atkinson - Characters, To Kill a Mockingbird
15 Views
Tough-o-Meter - Analysis, The Autobiography Of Malcolm X
15 Views
Chapter 24 - Summary, The Catcher in the Rye
14 Views
Narrator Point of View - Analysis, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
13 Views
Part 5, Book 2 Summary - Les Misérables
13 Views
Agamemnon - Characters, The Odyssey
12 Views
Arthur Radley (Boo) - Characters, To Kill a Mockingbird
12 Views
Chapter 19 Summary - The Portrait of a Lady
12 Views
Chapter 49 Summary - The Portrait of a Lady
12 Views
Part II, Chapter One Summary - One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
11 Views
Part 2, Book 4 Summary - Les Misérables
11 Views
The Orderlies - Characters, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
10 Views
Act 4, Scene 6 - Summary, King Lear
10 Views
What's Up With the Title? - Characters, King Lear
10 Views
Act 5, Scene 2 - Summary, Romeo and Juliet
10 Views
Trivia - Analysis, Romeo and Juliet
10 Views
Part 5, Book 4 Summary - Les Misérables
10 Views
Violence - Themes, 1984
9 Views
Trivia - Analysis, A Midsummer Night's Dream
9 Views
Part 5, Book 7 Summary - Les Misérables
9 Views
Warfare - Themes, 1984
8 Views
Tone - Analysis, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
8 Views
What's Up With the Ending? - Characters, King Lear
8 Views
What’s Up With the Title? - Analysis, A Tale of Two Cities
8 Views
Philosophical Viewpoints: Pan Africanism - Themes, The Autobiography Of Malcolm X
8 Views
Act IV, Scene iii - Summary, Hamlet
7 Views
Writing Style - Characters, King Lear
7 Views
The Honorable Elijah Muhammad a.k.a. Elijah Poole, Elijah Karriem - The Autobiography Of Malcolm X
7 Views
Chapter 13 - Summary, The Catcher in the Rye
6 Views
Chapter 25 - Summary, The Catcher in the Rye
6 Views
Book 17 Summary - The Odyssey
6 Views
Alkinoös - Characters, The Odyssey
6 Views
Tradition and Customs - Themes, The Communist Manifesto
6 Views
Steaminess Rating - Analysis, A Midsummer Night's Dream
6 Views
Act IV, Scene vii - Summary, Hamlet
5 Views
Act V, Scene i - Summary, Hamlet
5 Views
Part II, Chapter Two Summary - One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
5 Views
Youth - Themes, Les Misérables
5 Views
Trivia - Analysis, The Catcher in the Rye
4 Views
Part II, Chapter Four Summary - One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
4 Views
Part II, Chapter Seven Summary - One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
4 Views
Act 3, Scene 2 - Summary, Romeo and Juliet
4 Views
Victorian Age Fiction: Sensational Novels and England Question Novel
3 Views
Act V, Scene ii - Summary, Hamlet
3 Views
Loyalty - Themes, 1984
3 Views
Part II, Chapter Three Summary - One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
2 Views
Ageless and Aigisthos - Characters, The Odyssey
2 Views
Helios, Hephaistos, Hermes, and Kalypso - Characters, The Odyssey
2 Views
Notes: Levels of Teaching
505 Views
Notes : Novel Society
329 Views
XII English Novel Free Notes
38 Views
Chapter Notes: Noses
10 Views
Chapter Notes: Noses
10 Views
Chapter Notes: Nobel Laureates from India
1 Views
Tests View All
Questions View All
Principle: All citizens shall have the right to freedom of speech and expressionFacts:Ashok Mehta, a famous writer of the novels, criticized a novel written by khuswant Singh. “Khuswant Singh novel is foolish, he is a weakman, his novel is indecent, his mind is impure, he is not of a good character, he should write decent and good novels”Decide:whether ashok Mehta can be liable or not?a)He is not liable because he has just expressed his personal viewsb)He is liable to be sued for the case of defamation if his statement was not true of said in mala fide intention.c)He cannot be liable because he has fundamental right to freedom of speech and expressiond)None of the aboveCorrect answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
4 answers
A study of 200 comedy fiction readers revealed the impact of Wodehouse’s’ novels on human emotions. Each of the 200 participants was asked to read at least one novel per day over the course of 12 days. At the end of the experiment, all of the readers filled out a survey assessing their emotional state. It was found from the survey that some 10 students who read the greatest number of novels reported lower stress levels and higher energy levels. Also, most of the 20 students who read the fewest number of novels revealed below-average levels of emotional comfort.Which of the following must be true based on the evidence presented above?a)A majority of the participants lowered stress levels and reported higher emotional ease.b)During each week of the experiment, the participants spent at least 2 hours less per day on their academic work as a result of reading.c)Reading Wodehouse’s novels for at least 2 hours per day improves the emotional well-being of the majority of young adults.d)More than 8 participants read at least 14 novels during the course of the experiment.e)At least some of the students participated in the study in order to gain free access to Wodehouse’s novels.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
Needed a Test for novel society and history ncert? Related: History: Novels, Society and History (Part 1)
2 answers
A certain book rack contains a total of 150 hardcover books and 250 paperback books. 30% of the hardcover books and 10% of the paperback books are novels. If a book is randomly selected from the rack and is found to be a novel, then what is the probability that it is a hardcover book?
2 answers
The involvement of women in the writing of the novels led to :a)popularity of the novel among its readersb)novels exploring the world of women, their emotions and identities, their experiences and problemsc)the theme of the novels chosen was domestic about which the women were allowed tospeak with authorityd)both (b) and (c)Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
An online bookstore sells novels and magazines.Each novel sells for $4, and each magazine sells for $1. If Sadie purchased a total of 11 novels and magazines that have a combined selling price of $20, how many novels did she purchase?a)2b)3c)4d)5Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
Cooper believes that his latest novel presents a very charming story. Notwithstanding this appraisal, he feels this novel is a less _______ work than his more profound earlier novels.a)innovativeb)superficialc)delightfuld)fancifule)insightfulCorrect answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
A survey conducted in a library shows that 3746 persons like to read thriller novels, 2829 persons like classical novels and 4225 like romantic novels. The number of persons who like both thriller and classical novels but not romantic novels is 30% of the number of persons who like only thriller novels. Number of persons who like both classical and romantic novels but not thriller novels is 50% of the number of persons who like only classical novels. The number of persons who like both thriller and romantic novels but not classical novels is 60% of the number of persons who like only romantic novels. If 108 persons like to read all the three types of novels, then find the total number of persons on whom the survey was done in the library. (All the persons surveyed like at least one of the three types of the novels)a)8041b)10800c)4578d)7580Correct answer is option 'A'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
"I want to criticize the social system, and to show it at work, at its most intense." Virginia Woolf’s provocative statement about her intentions in writing Mrs. Dalloway has regularly been ignored by the critics, since it highlights an aspect of her literary interests very different from the traditional picture of the "poetic” novelist concerned with examining states of reverie and vision and with following the intricate pathways of individual consciousness. In her novels, Woolf is deeply engaged by the questions of how individuals are shaped (ordeformed) by their social environments, how historical forces impinge on people’s lives, how class, wealth, and gender help to determine people’s fates. Most of her novels are rooted in a realistically rendered social setting and in a precise historical time.Woolf’s focus on society has not been generally recognized because of her intense antipathy to propaganda in art. The pictures of reformers in her novels are usually satiric or sharply critical.Woolf detested what she called "preaching" in fiction, too, and criticized novelist D. H. Lawrence (among others) for working by this method. Woolf’s own social criticism is expressed in the language of observation rather than in direct commentary, since for her, fiction is a contemplative, not an active art. Woolf’s literary models were acute social observers like Chekhov and Chaucer. As she put it in The Common Reader, "It is safe to say that not a single law has been framed or one stone set upon another because of anything Chaucer said or wrote; and yet, as we read him, we are absorbing morality at every pore."Q. It can be inferred from the passage that Woolf chose Chaucer as a literary model because she believed thata)Chaucer was the first English author to focus on society as a whole as well as on individual charactersb)Chaucer was an honest and forthright author, whereas novelists like D.H. Lawrence did not sincerely wish to change societyc)Chaucer was more concerned with understanding his society than with calling its accepted mores into questiond)Chaucer’s writing was greatly, if subtly, effective in influencing the moral attitudes of his readersCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
Directions: Answer the questions based on following reading passage.It would be expected that a novel by a figure as prominent as W. E. B. DuBois would attract the attention of literary critics. Additionally, when the novel subtly engages the issue of race, as DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911) does, it would be a surprise not to encounter an abundance of scholarly work about that text. But though valuable scholarship has examined DuBois’ political and historical thought, his novels have received scant attention. Perhaps DuBois the novelist must wait his turn behind DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editor. But what if the truth lies elsewhere: what if his novels do not speak to current concerns?Q. In the fourth sentence (“Perhaps DuBois . . . editor.”), the author of the passage is most likely suggesting thata)scholars will find that DuBois’ novels are more relevant to current concerns than is his work as philosopher, historian, and editorb)more scholarly attention will be paid to The Quest of the Silver Fleece than to DuBois’ other novelsc)DuBois’ novels will come to overshadow his work as philosopher, historian, and editord)DuBois’ novels may eventually attract greater scholarly interest than they have to datee)it will be shown that DuBois’ work as philosopher, historian, and editor had an important influence on his work as novelistCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Answer the questions based on following reading passage.It would be expected that a novel by a figure as prominent as W. E. B. DuBois would attract the attention of literary critics. Additionally, when the novel subtly engages the issue of race, as DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911) does, it would be a surprise not to encounter an abundance of scholarly work about that text. But though valuable scholarship has examined DuBois’ political and historical thought, his novels have received scant attention. Perhaps DuBois the novelist must wait his turn behind DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editor. But what if the truth lies elsewhere: what if his novels do not speak to current concerns?Q. Which of the following best describes the central issue with which the passage is concerned?a)The perfunctoriness of much of the critical work devoted to DuBois’ novelsb)The nature of DuBois’ engagement with the issue of race in The Quest of the Silver Fleecec)Whether DuBois’ novels are of high quality and relevant to current concernsd)The relationship between DuBois the novelist and DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editore)The degree of consideration that has been given to DuBois’ novels, including The Quest of the Silver FleeceCorrect answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Refer to the following passage. After reading the passage, read and respond to each question selecting the best answer choice for each one.Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see its second part as a counterpoint that comments on, if it does not reverse, the first part, where a romantic reading receives more confirmation. Seeing the two parts as a whole is encouraged by the novel’s sophisticated structure, revealed in its complex use of narrators and time shifts. Granted that the presence of these elements need not argue for an authorial awareness of novelistic construction comparable to that of Henry James, their presence does encourage attempts to unify the novel’s heterogeneous parts. However, any interpretation that seeks to unify all of the novel’s diverse elements is bound to be somewhat unconvincing. This is not because such an interpretation necessarily stiffens into a thesis (although rigidity in any interpretation of this or of any novel is always a danger), but because Wuthering Heights has recalcitrant elements of undeniable power that, ultimately, resist inclusion in an all-encompassing interpretation. In this respect, Wuthering Heights shares a feature of Hamlet.Q. Which of the following inferences about Henry James’s awareness of novelisticconstruction is best supported by the passage?a)James, more than any other novelist, was aware of the difficulties of novelistic construction.b)James was very aware of the details of novelistic construction.c)James’s awareness of novelistic construction derived from his reading of Brontë.d)James’s awareness of novelistic construction has led most commentators to see unity in his individual novels.e)James’s awareness of novelistic construction precluded him from violating the unity of his novels.Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
novel society kya hai Related: NCERT Solution, Novels, Society and History, Class 10 SST?
1 answers
"I want to criticize the social system, and to show it at work, at its most intense." Virginia Woolf’s provocative statement about her intentions in writing Mrs. Dalloway has regularly been ignored by the critics, since it highlights an aspect of her literary interests very different from the traditional picture of the "poetic” novelist concerned with examining states of reverie and vision and with following the intricate pathways of individual consciousness. In her novels, Woolf is deeply engaged by the questions of how individuals are shaped (ordeformed) by their social environments, how historical forces impinge on people’s lives, how class, wealth, and gender help to determine people’s fates. Most of her novels are rooted in a realistically rendered social setting and in a precise historical time.Woolf’s focus on society has not been generally recognized because of her intense antipathy to propaganda in art. The pictures of reformers in her novels are usually satiric or sharply critical.Woolf detested what she called "preaching" in fiction, too, and criticized novelist D. H. Lawrence (among others) for working by this method. Woolf’s own social criticism is expressed in the language of observation rather than in direct commentary, since for her, fiction is a contemplative, not an active art. Woolf’s literary models were acute social observers like Chekhov and Chaucer. As she put it in The Common Reader, "It is safe to say that not a single law has been framed or one stone set upon another because of anything Chaucer said or wrote; and yet, as we read him, we are absorbing morality at every pore."Q. It can be inferred from the passage that the most probable reason Woolf realistically described the social setting in the majority of her novels was that shea)was aware that contemporary literary critics considered the novel to be the most realistic of literary genresb)was interested in the effect of a person’s social milieu on his or her character and actionsc)needed to be as attentive to detail as possible in her novels in order to support the arguments she advanced in themd)wanted to show that a painstaking fidelity in the representation of reality did not in any way hamper the artistCorrect answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.An important development in the twentieth century literary criticism was the growth of the New Criticism. The New Critics assumed that the methods devised for reading long poems could be applied to novels. In practice, this meant a new emphasis in the reading of fiction on scrupulous textual analysis as a prerequisite for biographical and ideological commend. A novelist’s ideas were now significant mainly as components of his or her writing technique. Insisting on close attention to a text, the New Critics analyzed long passages of a novel and concentrated on discerning the development of symbolic patterns. By analyzing symbols in this way, the critic could show how the meaning of symbol accrued as it was repeated in different passages. This permitted a more complete understanding of the symbol to emerge than that which could be discovered through isolated symbol-hunting. One novelist who benefited from this new emphasis on text was D.H.Lawrence, whose work was rescued from hostile critics who had attacked as mere ideology.Q.The passage implies that the New Critics would be most likely to agree with which of the following?a)Critical speculation on the connection between a novelist’s childhood and his or her writing is irrelevantb)The most scrupulously complete criticism is that which emphasizes connection between a novelist’s life and his or her writingc)A novelist’s life experiences can contribute to an understanding of his or her novels, but treatment of these experiences must be preceded by textual analysisd)Information about a novelist’s life can provide important critical insight into his or her novels, but such information should be subordinated to ideological investigationCorrect answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Answer the questions based on following reading passage. It would be expected that a novel by a figure as prominent as W. E. B. DuBois would attract the attention of literary critics. Additionally, when the novel subtly engages the issue of race, as DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911) does, it would be a surprise not to encounter an abundance of scholarly work about that text. But though valuable scholarship has examined DuBois’ political and historical thought, his novels have received scant attention. Perhaps DuBois the novelist must wait his turn behind DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editor. But what if the truth lies elsewhere: what if his novels do not speak to current concerns? Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage regarding DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece? a)The lack of attention devoted to The Quest of the Silver Fleece can be attributed to the fact that it was DuBois’ first novel. b)Among DuBois’ novels, The Quest of the Silver Fleece is unusual in that it has received scant attention from scholars. c)Much of the scholarly work that has focused on The Quest of the Silver Fleece has been surprisingly critical of it. d)The Quest of the Silver Fleece, given its subtle exploration of race, is probably the best novel written by DuBois. e)The Quest of the Silver Fleece has at least one feature that typically would attract the attention of literary scholars. Correct answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Slam poet Elizabeth Acevedos debut novel The Poet X, winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Young Peoples Literature, is composed of ______ protagonist, fifteen-year-old Xiomara Batista.Which choice completes the text so that it conforms to the conventions of Standard English?a)poems putatively written by the novelsb)poems putatively written by the novelsc)poems putatively written by the novelsd)poems putatively written by the novelsCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.An important development in the twentieth century literary criticism was the growth of the New Criticism. The New Critics assumed that the methods devised for reading long poems could be applied to novels. In practice, this meant a new emphasis in the reading of fiction on scrupulous textual analysis as a prerequisite for biographical and ideological commend. A novelist’s ideas were now significant mainly as components of his or her writing technique. Insisting on close attention to a text, the New Critics analyzed long passages of a novel and concentrated on discerning the development of symbolic patterns. By analyzing symbols in this way, the critic could show how the meaning of symbol accrued as it was repeated in different passages. This permitted a more complete understanding of the symbol to emerge than that which could be discovered through isolated symbol-hunting. One novelist who benefited from this new emphasis on text was D.H.Lawrence, whose work was rescued from hostile critics who had attacked as mere ideology.Q.The author alludes to D.H.Lawrence in order to give an example of a novelist whoa)sacrificed literary techniques to ideologyb)wrote both novels and long poemsc)subscribed to principles of New Criticismd)was reassessed because of New Critical principlesCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Which of the following would be the most appropriate title for the passage?a)Poetry and Satire as Influences on the Novels of Virginia Woolfb)Virginia Woolf: Critic and Commentator on the Twentieth-Century Novelc)Trends in Contemporary Reform Movements as a Key to Understanding Virginia Woolfs Novelsd)Society as Allegory for the Individual in the Novels of Virginia Woolfe)Virginia Woolfs Novels: Critical Reflections on the Individual and on SocietyCorrect answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
What is an ‘epistolary novel’?a)Novel written in the series of letters.b)Novel based on a biographical accountc)Novels written in poetic versed)None of these.Correct answer is option 'A'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
The passage below is accompanied by four questions. Based on the passage, choose the best answer for each question.For early postcolonial literature, the world of the novel was often the nation. Postcolonial novels were usually [concerned with] national questions. Sometimes the whole story of the novel was taken as an allegory of the nation, whether India or Tanzania. This was important for supporting anti-colonial nationalism, but could also be limiting - land-focused and inward-looking.My new book “Writing Ocean Worlds” explores another kind of world of the novel: not the village or nation, but the Indian Ocean world. The book describes a set of novels in which the Indian Ocean is at the centre of the story. It focuses on the novelists Amitav Ghosh, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Lindsey Collen and Joseph Conrad [who have] centred the Indian Ocean world in the majority of their novels. . . . Their work reveals a world that is outward-looking - full of movement, border-crossing and south-south interconnection. They are all very different - from colonially inclined (Conrad) to radically anti-capitalist (Collen), but together draw on and shape a wider sense of Indian Ocean space through themes, images, metaphors and language. This has the effect of remapping the world in the reader’s mind, as centred in the interconnected global south. . . .The Indian Ocean world is a term used to describe the very long-lasting connections among the coasts of East Africa, the Arab coasts, and South and East Asia. These connections were made possible by the geography of the Indian Ocean. For much of history, travel by sea was much easier than by land, which meant that port cities very far apart were often more easily connected to each other than to much closer inland cities. Historical and archaeological evidence suggests that what we now call globalisation first appeared in the Indian Ocean. This is the interconnected oceanic world referenced and produced by the novels in my book. . . .For their part Ghosh, Gurnah, Collen and even Conrad reference a different set of histories and geographies than the ones most commonly found in fiction in English. Those [commonly found ones] are mostly centred in Europe or the US, assume a background of Christianity and whiteness, and mention places like Paris and New York. The novels in [my] book highlight instead a largely Islamic space, feature characters of colour and centralise the ports of Malindi, Mombasa, Aden, Java and Bombay. . . . It is a densely imagined, richly sensory image of a southern cosmopolitan culture which provides for an enlarged sense of place in the world.This remapping is particularly powerful for the representation of Africa. In the fiction, sailors and travellers are not all European. . . . African, as well as Indian and Arab characters, are traders, nakhodas (dhow ship captains), runaways, villains, missionaries and activists. This does not mean that Indian Ocean Africa is romanticised. Migration is often a matter of force; travel is portrayed as abandonment rather than adventure, freedoms are kept from women and slavery is rife. What it does mean is that the African part of the Indian Ocean world plays an active role in its long, rich history and therefore in that of the wider world.All of the following statements, if true, would weaken the passage’s claim about the relationship between mainstream English-language fiction and Indian Ocean novels EXCEPT:a)the depiction of Africa in most Indian Ocean novels is driven by a postcolonial nostalgia for an idyllic pastb)the depiction of Africa in most Indian Ocean novels is driven by an Orientalist imagination of its cultural crudeness.c)very few mainstream English-language novels have historically been set in American and European metropolitan centres.d)most mainstream English-language novels have historically privileged the Christian, white, male experience of travel and adventure.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
The passage below is accompanied by four questions. Based on the passage, choose the best answer for each question.For early postcolonial literature, the world of the novel was often the nation. Postcolonial novels were usually [concerned with] national questions. Sometimes the whole story of the novel was taken as an allegory of the nation, whether India or Tanzania. This was important for supporting anti-colonial nationalism, but could also be limiting - land-focused and inward-looking.My new book “Writing Ocean Worlds” explores another kind of world of the novel: not the village or nation, but the Indian Ocean world. The book describes a set of novels in which the Indian Ocean is at the centre of the story. It focuses on the novelists Amitav Ghosh, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Lindsey Collen and Joseph Conrad [who have] centred the Indian Ocean world in the majority of their novels. . . . Their work reveals a world that is outward-looking - full of movement, border-crossing and south-south interconnection. They are all very different - from colonially inclined (Conrad) to radically anti-capitalist (Collen), but together draw on and shape a wider sense of Indian Ocean space through themes, images, metaphors and language. This has the effect of remapping the world in the reader’s mind, as centred in the interconnected global south. . . .The Indian Ocean world is a term used to describe the very long-lasting connections among the coasts of East Africa, the Arab coasts, and South and East Asia. These connections were made possible by the geography of the Indian Ocean. For much of history, travel by sea was much easier than by land, which meant that port cities very far apart were often more easily connected to each other than to much closer inland cities. Historical and archaeological evidence suggests that what we now call globalisation first appeared in the Indian Ocean. This is the interconnected oceanic world referenced and produced by the novels in my book. . . .For their part Ghosh, Gurnah, Collen and even Conrad reference a different set of histories and geographies than the ones most commonly found in fiction in English. Those [commonly found ones] are mostly centred in Europe or the US, assume a background of Christianity and whiteness, and mention places like Paris and New York. The novels in [my] book highlight instead a largely Islamic space, feature characters of colour and centralise the ports of Malindi, Mombasa, Aden, Java and Bombay. . . . It is a densely imagined, richly sensory image of a southern cosmopolitan culture which provides for an enlarged sense of place in the world.This remapping is particularly powerful for the representation of Africa. In the fiction, sailors and travellers are not all European. . . . African, as well as Indian and Arab characters, are traders, nakhodas (dhow ship captains), runaways, villains, missionaries and activists. This does not mean that Indian Ocean Africa is romanticised. Migration is often a matter of force; travel is portrayed as abandonment rather than adventure, freedoms are kept from women and slavery is rife. What it does mean is that the African part of the Indian Ocean world plays an active role in its long, rich history and therefore in that of the wider world.On the basis of the nature of the relationship between the items in each pair below, choose the odd pair out:a)Indian Ocean novels : Outward-lookingb)Postcolonial novels : Border-crossingc)Indian Ocean world : Slaveryd)Postcolonial novels : Anti-colonial nationalismCorrect answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
How did Indians use novels? (Social, Novels society and history)?
1 answers
What new styles of novels were written as novels became famous ?
1 answers
For the underlined part of the given sentence, choose the option that is grammatically correct, effective and reduces ambiguity and redundancy.Each of Camus's novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- were existentialist and invigorating novels, very different from the florid and verbose literature of his times.a)Each of Camus's novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- were existentialist and invigorating novels,b)The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- each of them Camus's novels-were existentialist and invigorating novels,c)Camus's novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- were existentialist and invigorating novels,d)Existentialist and invigorating novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- everyone of Camus's novels were,Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?
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Principle: All citizens shall have the right to freedom of speech and expressionFacts:Ashok Mehta, a famous writer of the novels, criticized a novel written by khuswant Singh. “Khuswant Singh novel is foolish, he is a weakman, his novel is indecent, his mind is impure, he is not of a good character, he should write decent and good novels”Decide:whether ashok Mehta can be liable or not?a)He is not liable because he has just expressed his personal viewsb)He is liable to be sued for the case of defamation if his statement was not true of said in mala fide intention.c)He cannot be liable because he has fundamental right to freedom of speech and expressiond)None of the aboveCorrect answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
4 answers
A study of 200 comedy fiction readers revealed the impact of Wodehouse’s’ novels on human emotions. Each of the 200 participants was asked to read at least one novel per day over the course of 12 days. At the end of the experiment, all of the readers filled out a survey assessing their emotional state. It was found from the survey that some 10 students who read the greatest number of novels reported lower stress levels and higher energy levels. Also, most of the 20 students who read the fewest number of novels revealed below-average levels of emotional comfort.Which of the following must be true based on the evidence presented above?a)A majority of the participants lowered stress levels and reported higher emotional ease.b)During each week of the experiment, the participants spent at least 2 hours less per day on their academic work as a result of reading.c)Reading Wodehouse’s novels for at least 2 hours per day improves the emotional well-being of the majority of young adults.d)More than 8 participants read at least 14 novels during the course of the experiment.e)At least some of the students participated in the study in order to gain free access to Wodehouse’s novels.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
Needed a Test for novel society and history ncert? Related: History: Novels, Society and History (Part 1)
2 answers
A certain book rack contains a total of 150 hardcover books and 250 paperback books. 30% of the hardcover books and 10% of the paperback books are novels. If a book is randomly selected from the rack and is found to be a novel, then what is the probability that it is a hardcover book?
2 answers
The involvement of women in the writing of the novels led to :a)popularity of the novel among its readersb)novels exploring the world of women, their emotions and identities, their experiences and problemsc)the theme of the novels chosen was domestic about which the women were allowed tospeak with authorityd)both (b) and (c)Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
An online bookstore sells novels and magazines.Each novel sells for $4, and each magazine sells for $1. If Sadie purchased a total of 11 novels and magazines that have a combined selling price of $20, how many novels did she purchase?a)2b)3c)4d)5Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
Cooper believes that his latest novel presents a very charming story. Notwithstanding this appraisal, he feels this novel is a less _______ work than his more profound earlier novels.a)innovativeb)superficialc)delightfuld)fancifule)insightfulCorrect answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
A survey conducted in a library shows that 3746 persons like to read thriller novels, 2829 persons like classical novels and 4225 like romantic novels. The number of persons who like both thriller and classical novels but not romantic novels is 30% of the number of persons who like only thriller novels. Number of persons who like both classical and romantic novels but not thriller novels is 50% of the number of persons who like only classical novels. The number of persons who like both thriller and romantic novels but not classical novels is 60% of the number of persons who like only romantic novels. If 108 persons like to read all the three types of novels, then find the total number of persons on whom the survey was done in the library. (All the persons surveyed like at least one of the three types of the novels)a)8041b)10800c)4578d)7580Correct answer is option 'A'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
"I want to criticize the social system, and to show it at work, at its most intense." Virginia Woolf’s provocative statement about her intentions in writing Mrs. Dalloway has regularly been ignored by the critics, since it highlights an aspect of her literary interests very different from the traditional picture of the "poetic” novelist concerned with examining states of reverie and vision and with following the intricate pathways of individual consciousness. In her novels, Woolf is deeply engaged by the questions of how individuals are shaped (ordeformed) by their social environments, how historical forces impinge on people’s lives, how class, wealth, and gender help to determine people’s fates. Most of her novels are rooted in a realistically rendered social setting and in a precise historical time.Woolf’s focus on society has not been generally recognized because of her intense antipathy to propaganda in art. The pictures of reformers in her novels are usually satiric or sharply critical.Woolf detested what she called "preaching" in fiction, too, and criticized novelist D. H. Lawrence (among others) for working by this method. Woolf’s own social criticism is expressed in the language of observation rather than in direct commentary, since for her, fiction is a contemplative, not an active art. Woolf’s literary models were acute social observers like Chekhov and Chaucer. As she put it in The Common Reader, "It is safe to say that not a single law has been framed or one stone set upon another because of anything Chaucer said or wrote; and yet, as we read him, we are absorbing morality at every pore."Q. It can be inferred from the passage that Woolf chose Chaucer as a literary model because she believed thata)Chaucer was the first English author to focus on society as a whole as well as on individual charactersb)Chaucer was an honest and forthright author, whereas novelists like D.H. Lawrence did not sincerely wish to change societyc)Chaucer was more concerned with understanding his society than with calling its accepted mores into questiond)Chaucer’s writing was greatly, if subtly, effective in influencing the moral attitudes of his readersCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
2 answers
Directions: Answer the questions based on following reading passage.It would be expected that a novel by a figure as prominent as W. E. B. DuBois would attract the attention of literary critics. Additionally, when the novel subtly engages the issue of race, as DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911) does, it would be a surprise not to encounter an abundance of scholarly work about that text. But though valuable scholarship has examined DuBois’ political and historical thought, his novels have received scant attention. Perhaps DuBois the novelist must wait his turn behind DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editor. But what if the truth lies elsewhere: what if his novels do not speak to current concerns?Q. In the fourth sentence (“Perhaps DuBois . . . editor.”), the author of the passage is most likely suggesting thata)scholars will find that DuBois’ novels are more relevant to current concerns than is his work as philosopher, historian, and editorb)more scholarly attention will be paid to The Quest of the Silver Fleece than to DuBois’ other novelsc)DuBois’ novels will come to overshadow his work as philosopher, historian, and editord)DuBois’ novels may eventually attract greater scholarly interest than they have to datee)it will be shown that DuBois’ work as philosopher, historian, and editor had an important influence on his work as novelistCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Answer the questions based on following reading passage.It would be expected that a novel by a figure as prominent as W. E. B. DuBois would attract the attention of literary critics. Additionally, when the novel subtly engages the issue of race, as DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911) does, it would be a surprise not to encounter an abundance of scholarly work about that text. But though valuable scholarship has examined DuBois’ political and historical thought, his novels have received scant attention. Perhaps DuBois the novelist must wait his turn behind DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editor. But what if the truth lies elsewhere: what if his novels do not speak to current concerns?Q. Which of the following best describes the central issue with which the passage is concerned?a)The perfunctoriness of much of the critical work devoted to DuBois’ novelsb)The nature of DuBois’ engagement with the issue of race in The Quest of the Silver Fleecec)Whether DuBois’ novels are of high quality and relevant to current concernsd)The relationship between DuBois the novelist and DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editore)The degree of consideration that has been given to DuBois’ novels, including The Quest of the Silver FleeceCorrect answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Refer to the following passage. After reading the passage, read and respond to each question selecting the best answer choice for each one.Many critics of Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights see its second part as a counterpoint that comments on, if it does not reverse, the first part, where a romantic reading receives more confirmation. Seeing the two parts as a whole is encouraged by the novel’s sophisticated structure, revealed in its complex use of narrators and time shifts. Granted that the presence of these elements need not argue for an authorial awareness of novelistic construction comparable to that of Henry James, their presence does encourage attempts to unify the novel’s heterogeneous parts. However, any interpretation that seeks to unify all of the novel’s diverse elements is bound to be somewhat unconvincing. This is not because such an interpretation necessarily stiffens into a thesis (although rigidity in any interpretation of this or of any novel is always a danger), but because Wuthering Heights has recalcitrant elements of undeniable power that, ultimately, resist inclusion in an all-encompassing interpretation. In this respect, Wuthering Heights shares a feature of Hamlet.Q. Which of the following inferences about Henry James’s awareness of novelisticconstruction is best supported by the passage?a)James, more than any other novelist, was aware of the difficulties of novelistic construction.b)James was very aware of the details of novelistic construction.c)James’s awareness of novelistic construction derived from his reading of Brontë.d)James’s awareness of novelistic construction has led most commentators to see unity in his individual novels.e)James’s awareness of novelistic construction precluded him from violating the unity of his novels.Correct answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
novel society kya hai Related: NCERT Solution, Novels, Society and History, Class 10 SST?
1 answers
"I want to criticize the social system, and to show it at work, at its most intense." Virginia Woolf’s provocative statement about her intentions in writing Mrs. Dalloway has regularly been ignored by the critics, since it highlights an aspect of her literary interests very different from the traditional picture of the "poetic” novelist concerned with examining states of reverie and vision and with following the intricate pathways of individual consciousness. In her novels, Woolf is deeply engaged by the questions of how individuals are shaped (ordeformed) by their social environments, how historical forces impinge on people’s lives, how class, wealth, and gender help to determine people’s fates. Most of her novels are rooted in a realistically rendered social setting and in a precise historical time.Woolf’s focus on society has not been generally recognized because of her intense antipathy to propaganda in art. The pictures of reformers in her novels are usually satiric or sharply critical.Woolf detested what she called "preaching" in fiction, too, and criticized novelist D. H. Lawrence (among others) for working by this method. Woolf’s own social criticism is expressed in the language of observation rather than in direct commentary, since for her, fiction is a contemplative, not an active art. Woolf’s literary models were acute social observers like Chekhov and Chaucer. As she put it in The Common Reader, "It is safe to say that not a single law has been framed or one stone set upon another because of anything Chaucer said or wrote; and yet, as we read him, we are absorbing morality at every pore."Q. It can be inferred from the passage that the most probable reason Woolf realistically described the social setting in the majority of her novels was that shea)was aware that contemporary literary critics considered the novel to be the most realistic of literary genresb)was interested in the effect of a person’s social milieu on his or her character and actionsc)needed to be as attentive to detail as possible in her novels in order to support the arguments she advanced in themd)wanted to show that a painstaking fidelity in the representation of reality did not in any way hamper the artistCorrect answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.An important development in the twentieth century literary criticism was the growth of the New Criticism. The New Critics assumed that the methods devised for reading long poems could be applied to novels. In practice, this meant a new emphasis in the reading of fiction on scrupulous textual analysis as a prerequisite for biographical and ideological commend. A novelist’s ideas were now significant mainly as components of his or her writing technique. Insisting on close attention to a text, the New Critics analyzed long passages of a novel and concentrated on discerning the development of symbolic patterns. By analyzing symbols in this way, the critic could show how the meaning of symbol accrued as it was repeated in different passages. This permitted a more complete understanding of the symbol to emerge than that which could be discovered through isolated symbol-hunting. One novelist who benefited from this new emphasis on text was D.H.Lawrence, whose work was rescued from hostile critics who had attacked as mere ideology.Q.The passage implies that the New Critics would be most likely to agree with which of the following?a)Critical speculation on the connection between a novelist’s childhood and his or her writing is irrelevantb)The most scrupulously complete criticism is that which emphasizes connection between a novelist’s life and his or her writingc)A novelist’s life experiences can contribute to an understanding of his or her novels, but treatment of these experiences must be preceded by textual analysisd)Information about a novelist’s life can provide important critical insight into his or her novels, but such information should be subordinated to ideological investigationCorrect answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Answer the questions based on following reading passage. It would be expected that a novel by a figure as prominent as W. E. B. DuBois would attract the attention of literary critics. Additionally, when the novel subtly engages the issue of race, as DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece (1911) does, it would be a surprise not to encounter an abundance of scholarly work about that text. But though valuable scholarship has examined DuBois’ political and historical thought, his novels have received scant attention. Perhaps DuBois the novelist must wait his turn behind DuBois the philosopher, historian, and editor. But what if the truth lies elsewhere: what if his novels do not speak to current concerns? Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage regarding DuBois’ The Quest of the Silver Fleece? a)The lack of attention devoted to The Quest of the Silver Fleece can be attributed to the fact that it was DuBois’ first novel. b)Among DuBois’ novels, The Quest of the Silver Fleece is unusual in that it has received scant attention from scholars. c)Much of the scholarly work that has focused on The Quest of the Silver Fleece has been surprisingly critical of it. d)The Quest of the Silver Fleece, given its subtle exploration of race, is probably the best novel written by DuBois. e)The Quest of the Silver Fleece has at least one feature that typically would attract the attention of literary scholars. Correct answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Slam poet Elizabeth Acevedos debut novel The Poet X, winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Young Peoples Literature, is composed of ______ protagonist, fifteen-year-old Xiomara Batista.Which choice completes the text so that it conforms to the conventions of Standard English?a)poems putatively written by the novelsb)poems putatively written by the novelsc)poems putatively written by the novelsd)poems putatively written by the novelsCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
1 answers
Directions: Read the following passage and answer the question.An important development in the twentieth century literary criticism was the growth of the New Criticism. The New Critics assumed that the methods devised for reading long poems could be applied to novels. In practice, this meant a new emphasis in the reading of fiction on scrupulous textual analysis as a prerequisite for biographical and ideological commend. A novelist’s ideas were now significant mainly as components of his or her writing technique. Insisting on close attention to a text, the New Critics analyzed long passages of a novel and concentrated on discerning the development of symbolic patterns. By analyzing symbols in this way, the critic could show how the meaning of symbol accrued as it was repeated in different passages. This permitted a more complete understanding of the symbol to emerge than that which could be discovered through isolated symbol-hunting. One novelist who benefited from this new emphasis on text was D.H.Lawrence, whose work was rescued from hostile critics who had attacked as mere ideology.Q.The author alludes to D.H.Lawrence in order to give an example of a novelist whoa)sacrificed literary techniques to ideologyb)wrote both novels and long poemsc)subscribed to principles of New Criticismd)was reassessed because of New Critical principlesCorrect answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
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Which of the following would be the most appropriate title for the passage?a)Poetry and Satire as Influences on the Novels of Virginia Woolfb)Virginia Woolf: Critic and Commentator on the Twentieth-Century Novelc)Trends in Contemporary Reform Movements as a Key to Understanding Virginia Woolfs Novelsd)Society as Allegory for the Individual in the Novels of Virginia Woolfe)Virginia Woolfs Novels: Critical Reflections on the Individual and on SocietyCorrect answer is option 'E'. Can you explain this answer?
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What is an ‘epistolary novel’?a)Novel written in the series of letters.b)Novel based on a biographical accountc)Novels written in poetic versed)None of these.Correct answer is option 'A'. Can you explain this answer?
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The passage below is accompanied by four questions. Based on the passage, choose the best answer for each question.For early postcolonial literature, the world of the novel was often the nation. Postcolonial novels were usually [concerned with] national questions. Sometimes the whole story of the novel was taken as an allegory of the nation, whether India or Tanzania. This was important for supporting anti-colonial nationalism, but could also be limiting - land-focused and inward-looking.My new book “Writing Ocean Worlds” explores another kind of world of the novel: not the village or nation, but the Indian Ocean world. The book describes a set of novels in which the Indian Ocean is at the centre of the story. It focuses on the novelists Amitav Ghosh, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Lindsey Collen and Joseph Conrad [who have] centred the Indian Ocean world in the majority of their novels. . . . Their work reveals a world that is outward-looking - full of movement, border-crossing and south-south interconnection. They are all very different - from colonially inclined (Conrad) to radically anti-capitalist (Collen), but together draw on and shape a wider sense of Indian Ocean space through themes, images, metaphors and language. This has the effect of remapping the world in the reader’s mind, as centred in the interconnected global south. . . .The Indian Ocean world is a term used to describe the very long-lasting connections among the coasts of East Africa, the Arab coasts, and South and East Asia. These connections were made possible by the geography of the Indian Ocean. For much of history, travel by sea was much easier than by land, which meant that port cities very far apart were often more easily connected to each other than to much closer inland cities. Historical and archaeological evidence suggests that what we now call globalisation first appeared in the Indian Ocean. This is the interconnected oceanic world referenced and produced by the novels in my book. . . .For their part Ghosh, Gurnah, Collen and even Conrad reference a different set of histories and geographies than the ones most commonly found in fiction in English. Those [commonly found ones] are mostly centred in Europe or the US, assume a background of Christianity and whiteness, and mention places like Paris and New York. The novels in [my] book highlight instead a largely Islamic space, feature characters of colour and centralise the ports of Malindi, Mombasa, Aden, Java and Bombay. . . . It is a densely imagined, richly sensory image of a southern cosmopolitan culture which provides for an enlarged sense of place in the world.This remapping is particularly powerful for the representation of Africa. In the fiction, sailors and travellers are not all European. . . . African, as well as Indian and Arab characters, are traders, nakhodas (dhow ship captains), runaways, villains, missionaries and activists. This does not mean that Indian Ocean Africa is romanticised. Migration is often a matter of force; travel is portrayed as abandonment rather than adventure, freedoms are kept from women and slavery is rife. What it does mean is that the African part of the Indian Ocean world plays an active role in its long, rich history and therefore in that of the wider world.All of the following statements, if true, would weaken the passage’s claim about the relationship between mainstream English-language fiction and Indian Ocean novels EXCEPT:a)the depiction of Africa in most Indian Ocean novels is driven by a postcolonial nostalgia for an idyllic pastb)the depiction of Africa in most Indian Ocean novels is driven by an Orientalist imagination of its cultural crudeness.c)very few mainstream English-language novels have historically been set in American and European metropolitan centres.d)most mainstream English-language novels have historically privileged the Christian, white, male experience of travel and adventure.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?
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The passage below is accompanied by four questions. Based on the passage, choose the best answer for each question.For early postcolonial literature, the world of the novel was often the nation. Postcolonial novels were usually [concerned with] national questions. Sometimes the whole story of the novel was taken as an allegory of the nation, whether India or Tanzania. This was important for supporting anti-colonial nationalism, but could also be limiting - land-focused and inward-looking.My new book “Writing Ocean Worlds” explores another kind of world of the novel: not the village or nation, but the Indian Ocean world. The book describes a set of novels in which the Indian Ocean is at the centre of the story. It focuses on the novelists Amitav Ghosh, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Lindsey Collen and Joseph Conrad [who have] centred the Indian Ocean world in the majority of their novels. . . . Their work reveals a world that is outward-looking - full of movement, border-crossing and south-south interconnection. They are all very different - from colonially inclined (Conrad) to radically anti-capitalist (Collen), but together draw on and shape a wider sense of Indian Ocean space through themes, images, metaphors and language. This has the effect of remapping the world in the reader’s mind, as centred in the interconnected global south. . . .The Indian Ocean world is a term used to describe the very long-lasting connections among the coasts of East Africa, the Arab coasts, and South and East Asia. These connections were made possible by the geography of the Indian Ocean. For much of history, travel by sea was much easier than by land, which meant that port cities very far apart were often more easily connected to each other than to much closer inland cities. Historical and archaeological evidence suggests that what we now call globalisation first appeared in the Indian Ocean. This is the interconnected oceanic world referenced and produced by the novels in my book. . . .For their part Ghosh, Gurnah, Collen and even Conrad reference a different set of histories and geographies than the ones most commonly found in fiction in English. Those [commonly found ones] are mostly centred in Europe or the US, assume a background of Christianity and whiteness, and mention places like Paris and New York. The novels in [my] book highlight instead a largely Islamic space, feature characters of colour and centralise the ports of Malindi, Mombasa, Aden, Java and Bombay. . . . It is a densely imagined, richly sensory image of a southern cosmopolitan culture which provides for an enlarged sense of place in the world.This remapping is particularly powerful for the representation of Africa. In the fiction, sailors and travellers are not all European. . . . African, as well as Indian and Arab characters, are traders, nakhodas (dhow ship captains), runaways, villains, missionaries and activists. This does not mean that Indian Ocean Africa is romanticised. Migration is often a matter of force; travel is portrayed as abandonment rather than adventure, freedoms are kept from women and slavery is rife. What it does mean is that the African part of the Indian Ocean world plays an active role in its long, rich history and therefore in that of the wider world.On the basis of the nature of the relationship between the items in each pair below, choose the odd pair out:a)Indian Ocean novels : Outward-lookingb)Postcolonial novels : Border-crossingc)Indian Ocean world : Slaveryd)Postcolonial novels : Anti-colonial nationalismCorrect answer is option 'B'. Can you explain this answer?
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How did Indians use novels? (Social, Novels society and history)?
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What new styles of novels were written as novels became famous ?
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For the underlined part of the given sentence, choose the option that is grammatically correct, effective and reduces ambiguity and redundancy.Each of Camus's novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- were existentialist and invigorating novels, very different from the florid and verbose literature of his times.a)Each of Camus's novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- were existentialist and invigorating novels,b)The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- each of them Camus's novels-were existentialist and invigorating novels,c)Camus's novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- were existentialist and invigorating novels,d)Existentialist and invigorating novels-The Outsider, The Rebel and The Plague- everyone of Camus's novels were,Correct answer is option 'C'. Can you explain this answer?
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